Adobe Photoshop PDF

244th Field Artillery Battalion Headquarters Battalion – December 1944

December 1944

Friday – 1st December 1944:[1]

XX Corps was disposed with the 5th Infantry Division on the south flank, in contact with 80th Infantry Division (XII corps), the 95th Infantry Division, and the 90th Infantry Division disposed along the corps front and the 10th Armored Division on the corps north flank.  The 10th Infantry Division), (5th Infantry Division), which was attached to the 95th Infantry Division, reverted to the 5th Infantry Division.  Task Force Fickett (6th Cavalry Group reinforced) was attached to 5th Infantry Division and began assembly in the vicinity of Carling (Q26), on right flank of the 95th Infantry Division.  Gains of about one mile were made by 10th Infantry (5th Infantry Division) in the vicinity of Carling (Q26), four miles north of St. Avold (Saint-Avold) (Q25).  The remainder of the division continued to exert maximum pressure on the Metz (U85) forts.  Just to the north, the 95th Infantry Division launched an attack supported by tank destroyers, with elements capturing Berus (Berus, Überherrn, Germany) (Q27), three and one-half mile southwest of Saarlautern (Saarlouis, Germany) (Q28), while others were two miles due west of the city.  Straightening its front lines with minor gains to the north, the 90th Infantry Division cleared Mondorf (Mondorf, Merzig, Germany) (Q19), two miles southwest of Mergiz (Merzig, Germany) (Q29).  The 357th Infantry (90th Infantry Division) cleared Siersdorf (Q28), four and one-half miles northwest of Saarlautern (Saarlouis, Germany) (Q28), and pushed patrols to Rehlingen (Rehlingen-Siersburg, Germany) (Q28) on the Saar River four miles north of Saarlautern (Saarlouis, Germany) (Q28).  On the north corps boundary, Combat Command “B” (10th Armored Division) took Hilbringen (Hilbringen, Merzig, Germany) (Q19), just west of Merzig (Q29), and continued to straighten its lines.  Combat Command “A” relieved Combat Command “B” at the end of the period, with Combat Command “B” moving to a concentration area north of Remeling (Rémeling, France) (Q09).  Task Force “B” moving to a concentration area north of Remeling (Rémeling, France) (Q09). Task Force POLK continued active patrolling on the corps north flank.

Friday – 1st December 1944:[2]

As the Third U.S. Army moved into the Siegfried Line defenses in early December, the enemy laid down the most intense artillery fire experienced since the Third U.S. Army became operational.  In the bridgeheads across the Saar River (Saarlautern (Q-28) – Dillingen (Q-28) the XX U.S. Corps received intense artillery fire practically twenty-four hours a day.  The enemy employed a new type of noise and flash suppressor which made the location of enemy artillery positions by flash and sound devices extremely difficult.

Friday – 1st December 1944:[3]

“B” Battery was detached from the Battalion for a week’s training to learn how to operate the LVT 1 (Landing Vehicle Tracked) “Alligartor” on the Moselle River.  Battery “B” went into action ferrying supplies across the Saar River near Saarlautern with small bridgeheads and each crossing met with artillery and small arms fire.  The mission was a success and there were no casualties.[4]

Friday – 1st December 1944:[5]

Battery “B” was, on 1 December 1944, located at Sierck-les-Bains (vU9895), attaché to the 55th Combat Engineer Battalion, with the mission of operating LVT M2 and M4  “Alligators” in the XX Corps river crossing operations in that locality.

Friday – 1st December 1944:[6]

The Battalion, less Battery “B”, was still attached to the 5th Infantry Division at Metz (vU849562) with the primary mission of reinforcing the fires of the 19th Field Artillery Battalion on Forts Plappeville, St. Quentin, Jeanne d’Arc and Driant, the remaining four Metz Forts which continue to resist.

Friday – 1st December 1944:[7]

The Battalion less “B” Battery at Metz (U849562).  Battery “B” with 55th Combat Engineers Battalion at Sierck-Les Bains (U9895). Battalion continue its mission of supporting artillery fire on four forts still resisting, i.e. Forts Plappeville, St. Quentin, Jeanne d’Arc and Driant.  174 harassing missions, including 9 TOT’s and 2 Registrations fired.  Ammo Expended 1059 rounds.  Battalion Commander made inspection of gun positions.

Friday – 1st December 1944:[8]

The Battalion, less Battery “B”, was in position at (vU 849562) Metz with Battery “A” armed with 10.5cm Light Field Howitzers, Battery “C” with 7.62cm Modified Russian Field Cannon and Headquarters Battery, as Battery “D”, with 8.8cm Pak 43 Guns.  The Batteries were laid to fire on Forts St. Quentin, Plappeville, Jeanne d‘Arc and Driant (Groupe Fortifié Driant), which still were resisting.  Ft. St. Privat had surrendered unconditionally on 30 November 1944.

Observation of the Forts was extremely limited.  Bad weather permitted limited use of Air Op’s which provide all the observation we had as the Forts were on high ground and ground OP’s to observe them were conspicuous by their absence.  Despite the lack of favorable weather, we were able to get at least one check registration daily.

Saturday – 2nd December 1944:[9] http://mapcarta.com/18071976

Task Force Fickett (6th Cavalry Group, reinforced) occupied positions along the XX Corps south flank after relieving elements of the 10th Infantry (5th Infantry Division) near Carling (France) (Q26), four miles north of Saint-Avold (Q25).  Some elements of the 5th Infantry Division gained over a mile in the vicinity of Wilhelmsbrown (Q26) seven miles north of Saint-Avold (France) (Q25) while the remainder of the division contained those forts holding out west of Metz (U85).  Preceded by aerial bombardment and artillery preparation, the 95th Infantry Division advanced in its zone from one to two miles, captured Niederlimberg (Q28), one and one-half miles northwest of Saarlautern (Q28) and Itzbach (Q28), four miles northwest of Saarlautern (Q28).  The 379th Infantry (95th Infantry Division) attacked Saarlautern (Q28) and pushed into the western part or the town, making minor gains in house-to-house fighting.  Corps heavy artillery fired in support of troops engaged in the street fighting.  When one side of a street was cleared, 8-inch howitzers and 240mm howitzers were adjusted by forward observers upon the buildings on the opposite side of the street until a breach was effected.  Infantry then dashed into the breached building and cleared the street house by house.  Enemy pillboxes and fortified houses were destroyed by 155mm guns.

Neuforweiler (Germany) (Q27) and Bisten (Bisten, Überherrn, Germany) (Q27), south of Saarlautern (Q28), were cleared by the 378th Infantry (95th Infantry Division), while other elements of the division captured a bridge intact across the Saar River.  Pickard (Pickardstraße, Saarwellingen, Germany) (Q27) and Beaumaris (Q27) were captured during this drive.  Elements of the 35th Infantry (90th Infantry Division) advanced one mile and occupied Rehlingen (Rehlingen-Siersburg, Germany) (Q28), on the west bank of the Saar River, four miles north of Saarlautern (Q28).  The 359th Infantry began relieving elements of the 357th Infantry Combat Command “A” (10th Armored Division) cleared Dreisbach (Dreisbach, Mettlach, Germany) (Q19), four miles northwest of Merzig (Germany) (Q29), while Combat Command “B” closed into an assembly area in the vicinity of Montenach (France) (Q09), ten miles northeast of Thionville (France) (U88).

Saturday – 2nd December 1944:[10]

Battery “B” was located at Sierck-les-Bains (vU9895), attaché to the 55th Combat Engineer Battalion, with the mission of operating LVT M2 and M4  “Alligators” in the XX Corps river crossing operations in that locality.

Saturday – 2nd December 1944:[11]

Battery “B” moved to the vicinity of Obersdorf (vQ1775).

Saturday – 2nd December 1944:[12]

Battery “B” in vicinity of Oversorf (Q1775).  Battalion location – no change. Missions fired 95; rounds expended 516.

Sunday – 3rd December:[13]

Task Force Fickett established contact with the 80th Infantry Division (XII Corps) and cleared Lauterbach (Q26), six miles northeast of St. Avold (Saint-Avold, France) (Q25).  Elsewhere in the XX Corps zone, the 10th Infantry (5th Infantry Division) straightened its front, capturing Cheutzwald (France) (Q26), and crossing the German Border, while other elements of the 5th Infantry Division occupied Wilhelmsbrosn (Q26).  A good part of Saarlautern (Q26) was held by the 95th Infantry Division which had elements clearing HallErfangen (Q28), northeast of the city, Saarlouis (Q27) and Lisdorf (Lisdorf Saarlouis, Germany) (Q27).  The 90th Infantry Division continued to clear the west bank of the Saar River in its zone.  There was no change in the disposition of the 10th Armored Division.

Sunday – 3rd December 1944:[14]

Battery “B” moved to the vicinity of Bouzonville (vQ124770) with no change in attachment or mission.

Sunday – 3rd December 1944:[15]

Battery “B”’s CP now in Bouzonville (Q124770).  Battalion still the same.  85 harassing missions; 524 rounds expended.

Monday – 4th December 1944:[16]

An Operational Directive instructed III Corps (87th Infantry Division) to relieve the 5th Infantry Division of XX Corps in the Metz (U85) area Mutual arrangement between III and XX Corps was to determine the time of relief.  III Corps was directed to contain the forts still resisting by exerting maximum pressure without assaulting directly any major fortifications, to assume command of additional troops to be assigned, and to advance on Army order.  XX Corps was to withdraw elements of the 5th Infantry Division successively from the Metz (U85) area upon relief by elements of the 87th Infantry Division and continue the offensive as instructed in the Operational Directive of 3rd November, as amended.

Advances or two to four miles were made by the 5th Infantry Division in the XX Corps zone, and elements drove into the vicinity of Differten (Differten, Wadgassen, Germany) (Q37) at the northern tip of the Foret Der Karlsbrunn  (Q26).  Street fighting in Saarlautern (Q28) was continued by the 95th Infantry Division, while elements of the division secured a bridgehead at Lisdorfer (Lisdorfer Straße, Saarlouis, Germany) (Q28) and enlarged the bridgehead at Saarlautern (Q28) across the Saar River.  A chemical smoke operation aided the crossing.  To the north the 90th Infantry Division and the 10th Armored Division continued regroupment and preparation for renewal or their attack.

Monday – 4th December 1944:[17]

On the 2nd, 3rd, and 4th of December, Company B, with two sections of smoke generators made diversionary demonstrations of river crossing along the Saar River.  The smoke was laid over the river at three places.  Air compressors were operated in defiladed positions to simulate the sound of bridge construction and columns of light tanks were run up and down the road near the river at night to simulate movement of troops and equipment.  In one phase of this demonstration the smoke generators were unable to provide sufficient smoke to give the desired results.  The town of Schwemlingen (Germany) (Q1797) was situated on the river bank at this point.  Lt. Bidigare in charge of the demonstration, set fire to this town.  The smoke and flames created by the burning town completely hid the river and the activity of the American troops on the near bank.  This demonstration succeeded in causing the Germans to move both troops and equipment from the area in the South where the 90th and 95th Infantry Divisions forced river crossings.

Monday – 4th December 1944:[18]  Operational Directive, Commanding General, III Corps, APO 303, U S Army and Commanding General, XX Corps, APO 340, U S Army: c. 244th FA. Bn (-B Btry) and B Btry, 558th FA Bn are detached from XX Corps and attached to III Corps.

Monday – 4th December 1944:[19]

No change in location.  Battalion fire 683 rounds ammo.  Many planes overhead from 2015 to 2115 – no bombing.  Battalion relieved of attachment to XX corps and attached to III corps (less Battery “B”).

Tuesday – 5th December 1944:[20]

Combat Command “B” (4th Armored Division) crossed the Eichel River at Vollerdingen (Vœllerdingen) (France) (Q54), while Combat Command “A’ crossed one mile to the south at Domfessel (France) (Q53), and then made a rapid seven-mile advance to the northeast with leading elements at Bining (France) (Q64), Schmittville (France) (Q54) and Kalhausen (France) (Q54).  The enemy offered armored resistance in force against this advance in XII Corps zone.  In a three-mile advance the 101st and 104th Infantry Regiments (26th Infantry Division) captured Oermingen (France) (Q54), four miles north of Sarr-Union (France) (Q53), while the 328th Infantry advanced in the vicinity of Sarralbe (France) (Q27).  Meanwhile in the 35th Infantry Division the 320th Infantry captured Willerwald (France) (Q44), five and one-half miles southwest or Sarreguemines (France) (Q55), and the 134th Infantry captured Hambach (France) (Q45) , three miles southwest of Sarreguemines (France) (Q55).  The 6th Armored Division captured Rouhling (France) (Q46) and Ippling (France) (Q45), west or Sarreguemines (Q55), while the 80th Infantry Division on the north took some high ground and improved its positions.

The 5th Infantry Division made advances from two to five miles in XX Corps zone, captured Karlsbrunn (Germany) (Q36) and Merlebach (Merlebach, Freyming) (France) (Q36), southwest of Saarbrucken (Saarbrücken) (Germany) (Q57), while a few elements of the division continued to contain the forts still holding out in the Metz (U85) area.  Fighting in the eastern part of Saarlautern (Forst Saarlautern Schmelz) (Germany) (Q28) was continued by elements of the 95th Infantry Division, while other elements enlarged the bridgehead at Lisdorf (Lisdorf Saarlouis) (Germany) (Q26).  Assault crossings of the Saar River were made in four places by the 90th Infantry Division between two and five miles north of Saarlautern (Saarlouis, Saarland) (Germany) (Q28), while Pachten (Q28) was captured.  To preserve surprise no artillery preparation was fired, but an intensive schedule of counterbattery fire was launched from H-Hour to H – 45 consisting of approximately 8,000 rounds on thirty-nine enemy artillery locations.  The 10th Armored Division continued aggressive patrolling on the corps north flank, but its front lines were unchanged.

Tuesday – 5th December 1944:[21]

On 5 December, III Corp received its first combat mission directive from Third Army. The mission was, “(1) to relieve XX Corps of responsibility in the Metz France area; (2) to relieve the 5th Division with elements of the 87th Infantry Division and contain the remaining Metz forts without directly assaulting any major fortification; and (3) to be prepared to receive additional troops and advance on Army order.”

The forts at Metz had been by-passed by the Third Army drive through France and were being secured by the 5th Division.  The relief of the 5th Division by the 87th Division was not completed until 18 December.  Elements of the 87th Infantry Division arrived, relieved the 5th Division and control of the area passed to III Corps.

Control of the III Corps artillery did not pass to the III Corps at this time.  Instead, the 244th Field Artillery Battalion, using captured German weapons, was assigned to conduct a program of harassing fire.  (The men of the 244th Battalion had not received their howitzers yet.)

Tuesday – 5th December 1944:[22]

Battalion situation the same.  392 rounds harassing fire on Ft. St. Quentin.  Firing discontinue on Fort Driant (Groupe Fortifié Driant) and St. Quenton pending outcome of parley.

Wednesday – 6th December 1944:[23]

III Corps moved from its concentration area at Etain (U47) to Metz (U85) and opened its new Command Post.

The 4th Armored Division (XII Corps) consolidated its gains and Combat Command “B” advanced two miles to occupy Singling (Q65), eight miles southeast of Sarreguemines (Q55) while Combat Command “A” made small advances in the vicinity of Bining (Q64).  Meanwhile, in an advance to the northeast the 104th Infantry (26th Infantry Division) reached the outskirts of Etting (Q64), seven miles southeast of Saarguemines (Q55), while the 328th Infantry cleared Sarralbe (Q27) and the 101st Infantry reached Kulhausne (Kalhausen) (Q54).  Advancing two miles, the 6th Armored Division took Nelferding (Q55), while other elements were in the vicinity of Lixing (Q46).  The 80th Infantry Division maintained its front line sent out aggressive patrols, while the 2nd Calvary Group assumed the north flank protection and pushed patrols to Forbach (Q36) Getting (Q46) and Emmersweller (Q36).

Wednesday – 6 December 1944:[24]

Fort St. Quentin surrendered because of lack of food.

Wednesday – 6th December 1944:[25]

Battalion less “B” Battery relieved from attachment to 5th Infantry Division and attached to 87th Infantry Division.  Fort St. Quentin surrendered at 1300 – 22 officers and 571 enlisted men taken prisoner.  Premature burst in one of “C” Battery’s guns – no casualties.  Battalion experimenting with anti-flash powder – excellent results.  329 rounds ammo fired on harassing missions on forts still resisting.

Wednesday – 6th December 1944:[26]

The Battalion was relieved of attachment to the 5th Infantry Division and attached to the 87th Infantry Division with no change in location or mission.

Thursday – 7th December 1944:[27]

On the XII Corps north flank patrols of the 2nd Cavalry Group entered Forbach (Q46), four miles southeast of Saarbrucken (Q57).  Fort Plappeville (Q86), west of Metz (U85), surrendered to the 5th Infantry Division (XX Corps) while other elements of the 5th Infantry Division made advances of one to two miles to the Saar River, clearing the four small towns, Wedgassen (Q37), Hostenbach (Q37), Wehrden (Wehrden, Saarland, Germany) (Q37) and Furstenhausen (Q37), north and south of Wolflingen (Q37), and drove to a point four and one-half miles west of Saarbrucken (Q57).  Small advances were made by the 379th Infantry (95th Infantry Division), while other elements of the division met heavy resistance in limited attacks within Saarlautern (Saarlouis) (Q28) and 378th Infantry continued the attack at Ensdorf (Ensdorf, Saarlouis, Germany) (Q37), one mile to the south.  In the 90th Infantry Division zone the 357th Infantry continued its attack to the northeast in the forest one and one-half miles north of Dillingen (Dillingen/Saar, Germany) (Q28), while the 358th Infantry reported a heavy counterattack on is bridgehead at Pachten (Q28).  Holding its zone west of the river, the 359th Infantry enlarged its bridgehead.  There was no change in the 10th Armored Division or in Task Force Polk, which maintained patrols on the north flank.

Thursday – 7th December 1944:[28]

Fort Plappelville surrendered because of lack of food.

Thursday – 7th December 1944:[29]

Ft. Plappeville surrendered at 1500 – 11 officers and 208 enlisted men taken prisoner.  Forts Jeanne d’Arc and Driant only resisting forts – 624 rounds fired on these two forts.  Lt. Garland received Award of Ari Medal for participating in aerial Flight against Enemy.  GO #105 Hq TUSA dtd 7th December 1944.

Friday – 8th December 1944:[30]

On 8th December, at 1600 III Corps became operational as planned when the 345th Infantry, 87th Division, completed relief of the 5th Division in containing Fort Jeanne d’Arc, the only fort which had not by this time capitulated.  At that time Corps assumed full responsibility in the Metz area, and in addition to the already attached units received the 244th Field Artillery Battalion (minus Battery B) which was equipped with captured enemy weapons.

During the entire period 8 December – 14 December, in compliance with Third Army’s instructions, no effort was made to directly assault Fort Jeanne D’Arc.  Psychological warfare (leaflets fired by artillery, loudspeakers) was utilized in an effort to induce the occupants of the fort to surrender, and continuous harassing artillery fire was placed on the fort throughout the entire period.  No surrender was expected, however, until food or ammunition was exhausted.  In addition to holding the fort, the enemy was considered capable of employing small patrols to obtain rations, and of sending out patrols to infiltrate to the German lines, by now far to the East.

Friday – 8th December 1944:[31]

On the south flank of XII corps, elements of the 4th Armored Division continued to be relieved by the 12th Armored Division (XV Corps, Seventy U.S. Army) following a readjustment in the inter-Army Group boundary.  The 26th Infantry Division attacked to the northeast after a heavy air bombardment had helped to soften enemy resistance on its front, captured Achen (Q54), six and one-half miles southeast of Sarreguenines (Q55), and entered Wiesviller (Q55).  Meanwhile, the 35th Infantry resumed its attack aided by tank destroyers and made four crossings of the Saar River, one at Sarreguemines (Q55) and three to the southeast at Remelfing (Q55), Zetting (Q55) and Dieding (Q55).  Advances the Dieding (Q55) bridgehead were temporarily held up to allow supporting elements to cross the river.  Sarreinsning (Q55) was cleared while patrols entered Neunkirch (Q55).  On the corps north flank the 6th Armored Division continued its patrols, with no changes on the front lines.

Elements of the 5th Infantry Division on the front line were being relieved by elements of Task Force Fickett, while to the rear, Fort Driant (U75), west of Metz (U85), surrendered to other elements of the 5th Infantry Division early in the period.  At this time only one Metz fort, Fort Jeanne D’Arc (U75), still resisted.  Fighting inside Saarlautern (Q28) was continued by the 95th Infantry Division, with progress being reported by all infantry elements of the division which had completed crossings of the Saar River.  Elements of the 359th Infantry (90th Infantry Division) started crossing the Saar River at Dillingen (Dillingen/Saar, Germany) (Q28) following repulse of a counterattack.

Friday – 8th December 1944:[32]

Fort Driant surrendered at 1630 – over 600 prisoners taken, 122 harassing missions fired – 344 rounds expended.

Saturday – 9th December 1944:[33]

Street fighting continued in Sarreguenises (Q55) in the XII Corps zone.  Enemy troops in fortified houses and pillboxes continued the advance of the 95th Infantry Division in the Saarlautern (28) bridgeheads while father north in the XX corps zone the 90th Infantry Division met stiff resistance.

The 87th Infantry Division (III Corps) contained Fort Jeunne D’Arc (U75) the last resisting Metz (U85) fort.

The 6th Cavalry Group (XX Corps) maintained position on the south flank following its relief of the 5th Infantry Division which had retired to an assembly area north of St. Avold (Q25).  In the 95th Infantry Division bridgehead around Saarlautern (Q25), the advance continued, while father north the 90th Infantry Division advanced against heavily fortified positions, with the 359th Infantry crossing the Saar River.  There was no change in disposition of 10th Armored Division on the corps north flank.

A demonstration was conducted to acquaint the XII Corps artillery with the use and characteristics of the new Pozit fuse, with extraordinary results being obtained.  A smaller demonstration was conducted for XX Corps artillery the following day.  The fuze, which exploded automatically by magnetic attraction approximately thirty feet from the ground or from metal objects, was employed by antiaircraft artillery as well as by field artillery.

Saturday – 9th December 1944:[34]

Continuing his strong delaying actions in the XII Corps zone, the enemy launched numerous small counterattacks.  Heavy artillery tire was used against the Saarlautern (Saarlouis, Germany) (Q28) bridgehead in XX Corps zone.  There was an increase in enemy activity in III Corps zone as considerable mortar fire was laid down from Fort Jeanne D’ARC (U75) at Metz (085).  III Corps remained at Metz (U85), with the 345th Infantry (87th Infantry Division) continuing to contain Fort Jeanne D’Arc (U75).  The 101st Infantry (26th Infantry Division) closed in the Metz (085) area.

Fighting continued in Saarlautern (Saarlouis, Germany) (Q28) to enlarge the bridgehead of the 95th Infantry Division, with small advances made against pillboxes and fortified houses.  The 90th Infantry Division continued to attack to the northeast in the XX Corps zone and small advances were made north of Dillingen (Dillingen/Saar, Germany) (Q28).  Several enemy counterattacks were repulsed with no ground lost.  Task Force Polk on the corps north flank maintained its front line patrols with no change, while 6th Cavalry Group (reinforced) continued active patrolling in its zone.  The 5th Infantry Division and the 10th Armored Division remained in their respective areas.

Saturday – 9th December 1944:[35]

Fort Driant surrendered.

Saturday – 9th December 1944:[36]

Ft. Jeanne D’Arc still holing out.  584 rounds fired on this fort.

Sunday – 10th December 1944:[37]

88 harassing missions fired on Ft. Jeanne d’Arc: 268 rounds expended.

Monday – 11th December:[38]

XII Corps (the 35th, 80th, and 87th Infantry Division, the 4th and 6th Armored Division and supporting troops) was directed to pass control of the 6th Armored Division to the III Corps at once and to continue its current mission.  XX Corps (the 5th, 90th and 95th Infantry Division, the 10th Armored Division and supporting troops) was to pass control of the 6th Cavalry group to the III corps at once and to continue its current mission.

Fort Jeanne D’Arc (U75) was being contained in III Corps zone.  Effective this date the 6th Cavalry Group, reinforced) was attached for operational control only, although neither unit was immediately committed to action by III Corps.

The 95th Infantry Division continued house-to-house fighting in the Saarlautern (Saarlouis, Germany) (Q28) bridgehead, in the XX Corps zone, with about one-third of the suburb of Fraulautern (Fraulautern, Saarwellingen, Germany) (Q38) being cleared.  Heavy fighting also continued at Ensdorf (Q37).  Efforts to enlarge the 90th Infantry Division bridgehead continued with slight advances being made against harassing enemy artillery fire.  There was no change in the 10th Armored Division, Task Forec Polk, or the 5th Infantry Division.

Monday – 11th December 1944:[39]

Battery “B” move to Duren (vQ220789) from which one platoon was attaché to the 90th Infantry Division and the remainder of the Battery to the 95th Infantry Division.  The Battery remained in these positions, operating the LVT’s across the Saar River until it was relieved of this Mission on 19 December 1944.  It rejoined the Battalion on 23 December 1944, the interim being spent in turning in the LVT’s and reorganization and rehabilitation of the Battery at Metz.

December 1944:[40]

The River crossing operation of the XX Corps at Saarlautern was seriously impeded by heavy German resistance.  A series of pillboxes lined the German side of the River in the flat.  Our infantry reduced these pillboxes in the initial crossing and established a bridgehead.  German infantry infiltrate through our lines an reoccupied the pillboxes, delivering effective AW and SA fire on our troops attempting to cross the river with supplies an reinforcements.  The main stone bridge at Saarlautern had been capture intact but was very heavily shelled constantly by German artillery – in fact, the entire American Bridgehead area receive heavy shelling.

It was the mission of Battery “B”s LVT crews to operate these vehicles across the Saar in ferrying supplies, food, ammunition and reinforcements.  All crossings had to be made at night because of enemy artillery fire.  In all, only four successful crossings were made.  Six LVT’s were knocked out by enemy shelling.  Miraculously, the Battery sustained no casualties to personnel despite the extremely perilous conditions under which it worked for three weeks.

Monday -  11th December 1944:[41]

Battery “B”’s CP at Duren (Q220789).  Harassing missions fired on Ft. Jeanne D’Arc 139 – rounds expended 294.

Tuesday – 12th December 1944:[42]

With the surrender at 121125 of Fort Jeanne D’Arch (U75), the last remaining strongpoint of the hitherto impregnable Metz (85) fort fell to Third U.S. Army.  The garrison surrendered to the 101st Infantry (26th Infantry Division), following its relief of the 345th Infantry 87th infantry Division), Effective on this date, the 26th Infantry Division was assigned to III Corps.

The 26th Infantry Division, reinforced largely with troops from third U.A. Army Headquarters and corps and division headquarters who had been given a refresher course in infantry training, had two regiments, the 101st and 104th infantry, in the vicinity of Metz (U85), while the 328th Infantry made advances of one mile and captured the high ground southeast of Obergailbach (France) (Q65).  Attached to the 26th infantry Division, the 346th infantry (87th Infantry Diviso0n made advance of one and one-half miles to the northeast to Rimling (France) (Q26) against light resistance.  The 347th Infantry (87th Infantry Division) closed into an assembly area near Kulhausen (Q54), south of Sarreguemines (France) (Q55), while the 345th Infantry began moving from Metz (U85) to rejoin the remainder of the division.  Elsewhere in XII Corps Zone, heavy concentrations of artillery and small arms fire were directed at 35th Infantry Division zone by the division advanced slowly, the 134th Infantry taking Nabkirchen (Q56) and crossing the Blies River in assault boats while the 137th Infantry continued to mop up in Sarreguemines (France) (Q55).  There was no change in the zone of the 4th and 6th Armored Division and the 80th Infantry Division.

House-to-house fighting in Saarlautern-Roden (Roden, Saarlouis, Germany) (Q28) and Fraulautern (Saarwellingen, Germany) (Q38) was continued by the 95th Infantry Division in the XX Corps zone, while its 37th infantry continued to enlarge the Ensdorf (Germany) (Q37) bridgehead south of Saarlautern (Saarlouis Germany) (Q28).  Farther north, the 90th Infantry Division fought hard to enlarge its bridgehead, brought supplies and supporting weapons across the Saar River under cover of smoke, and beat off savage counterattacks.  Front lines of the 90th Infantry Divisions were unchanged at the end of the period.  There was no change in the disposal of the 5th Infantry Division, the 10th Armored Division or Task Force Polk, the latter being on the north flank performing patrol duties.

Tuesday – 12th December 1944:[43]

Ft. Jeanne d’Arc surrendered at approximately 1115.  No change in location of Battalion position.

Tuesday – 13th December 1944:[44]

III Corps took 514 prisoners of war from fort Jeanne D’Arc (U75), last of the Metz (U85) forts.  More elements of the 26th Infantry Division closed at Metz (U85) in the III Corps zone.  A determined enemy defense slowed down the advance in the XII Corps zone, while the enemy continued his strong defense in the Saar River bridgehead in the XX Corps zone.

Advances in zone on the south flank of XII Corps, to the vicinity of Obergailbach (France) (Q65) were made by the 346th infantry (26th Infantry Division) assembling in an area near Achen (France) (Q54) preparatory to rejoining the rest of the division at Metz (U85).  Farther north, advances to the north of Neunkirch (Neunkirchen, Germany) (Q55) and Frauenberg (France) (Q55), three miles northeast of Sarreguemines (France) (Q55) were made by the 137th Infantry (35th Infantry Division).  On the north of the 35th infantry Division zone the 320th Infantry made another crossing of the Blise River near Bliesbruck (Germany) (Q55) four miles east of Sarreguemines (France) (Q55), the crossing being made under heavy artillery fire, while supporting weapons were ferried across the river in the rear of the advancing troops.  During the period the 4th and 6th Armored Division and the 80th Infantry Division remained unchanged.

The 95th Infantry Division made small gains to the north and east with its 377th and 379th Infantry Regiments.  House-to-house fighting continued in Saarlautern-Roden (Roden, Saarlouis, Germany) (Q28) and Ensdorf (Q37).  Meanwhile, elements of the 90th Infantry Division, advancing against stiff resistance, and clearing numerous pillboxes, reinforced their XX Corps bridgehead areas.  Tank destroyers were carried across the river on pontoon ferries under fire, believed to be the first time that this feat had been accomplished.  The 5th Infantry Division, 10th Armored Division, and Task Force Polk on the Army north flank were unchanged during the period.

Wednesday – 13th December 1944:[45]

At 0900 on 13th December, Major Hans Voss, Commanding Office’r of the German forces in Fort Jeanne D’Arc, asked for a truce, and at 1115 surrender unconditionally the fortress and 511 officers and enlisted men to Colonel Walter T. Scott, commander of the 101st Infantry, 26th Division.

Wednesday – 13th December 1944:[46]

Battalion situation – no change.  Battalion Exec went to “B” Battery at 0630 to inspect area and men.

Thursday – 14th December 1944:[47]

III Corps took over control of part of the Army zone between XII and XX Corps, and assumed control of the 26th Infantry Division, 6th Armored Division, Task Force Fickett, and the 42nd Infantry Division (upon arrival) which division was completely unloaded at Marseilles (France) (T41).  Front lines were unchanged during the period; however, aggressive patrols were continued by the 6th Armored Division and Task Force Fickett.

Readjustment between corps left the XII Corps with the 35th, 80th and 87th Infantry Divisions, and the 4th Armored Division.  The 4th Armored Division continued its training and rehabilitation program.  To the north, the 87th Infantry Division made a one mile advance with the 346th and 347th Infantry Regiments.  The 346th Infantry reached the German border eight and one-half miles east of Sarreguemines (France) (Q55), and took Rimling (France) (Q65), while the 347th Infantry cleared Obergailbach (France) (Q65), six miles east of Sarreguemines (France) (Q55).  The 35th Infantry Division continued its attack to the north.  Its 137th Infantry beat off two counterattacks and advanced one-half mile into the woods north of Habkirchen (Kindergarten Habkirchen, Prälat-Roth-Straße, Mandelbachtal, Germany) (Q55), while the 134th Infantry gained one mile in the vicinity of Relcheim (Q56).  On the right flank Nieder-Gailbach (Q65) was cleared by the 320th Infantry after a one-mile advance.  There was no change in the 80th Infantry Division.  A broadcast made to German units in Bliesbrucken (Bliesbruck, France) (Q55) by the Psychological Warfare unit attached to Headquarters, XII Corps, was credited with bringing twenty-eight prisoners of war into the Army lines.

XX Corps had the 5th, 90th, 95th Infantry Divisions, the 10th Armored Division and Task Force Polk after the corps realignment.  On the south of corps zone the 5th Infantry Division was unchanged.  The attack inside Saarlautern-Roden (Roden, Saarlouis, Germany) (Q28) continued by the 379th Infantry (95th Infantry Division) with numerous fortified houses being reduced.  A ferry across the SAAR River moved up equipment to the 378th Infantry in the Ensdorf (Q37) bridgehead.  Various elements of the 90th Infantry Division made local gains, with the 358th Infantry fighting in Dillingen (Dillingen/Saar, Germany) (Q28) and the 359th Infantry making small gains north of the city, while ferrying of supplies and equipment across the Saar River continued.  There was no change in the 10th Armored Division or in Task Force Polk on the Army north flank.

Work was begun to clear Fort Jeanne D’Arc (U75) at Metz (U85) of mines, booby traps and delayed action charges so that a communications system could be installed.

Thursday – 14th December 1944:[48]

Fort Jeanne d’Arc, the last Fort to surrendered, capitulate.

Thursday – 14th December 1944:[49]

BATTALION RECEIVE IT’S GUNS, 155mm, M1A1, TODAY.  BATTALION IN FORMATION;  PRESENTED ARMS AS THEY ROLLED BY!

Thursday – 14th December 1944:[50]

The 155mm M1A1 “Long Toms” arrived towed by the M4 High Speed Tractor.  The Battalion Presented Arms in front of the Command Post.

Thursday – 14th December 1944:[51]

The Battalion received its primary weapons 155mm Guns, M1A1.

Thursday – 14th December 1944:[52]

The Battalion receive 12 155mm Guns, M1A1 and spent the next three days, day and night removing preservative compound, cleaning and checking these weapons.

XX Corps

­­­­———————————————–

III Corps

Friday – 15th December 1944:[53]

XII Corps continued to advance slowly against heavy resistance.  Its 4th Armored Division continued screening the corps south flank while the 87th Infantry Division attacked north with the 345th Infantry approaching Erching (Q65), eight miles east of Sarreguemines (Q66) after advances of one and one-half miles.  The 346th Infantry (87th Infantry Division) assembled in the vicinity of Rimling (Q65), while the 347th Infantry attacked to the north near Medelsheim (Germany) (Q66).  The 35th Infantry Division continued clearing Nieder-Gailbach (Q65) and also attacked to the north, but made only local gains around Habkirchen (Kindergarten Habkirchen, Prälat-Roth-Straße, Mandelbachtal, Germany) (Q55) and Relcheim (Q56).  Tank destroyers supporting the attacks reduced five strongpoints. Elsewhere in the corps there was no change.

Local advances by the 95th Infantry Division in Saarlauiern-Roden (Roden, Saarlouis, Germany) (Q28) were made against heavy resistance, while the enemy continued his heavy artillery fire against the 90th and 95th Infantry Division in the XX Corps zone.

Overshoes remained in critical short supply, a total of 82,500 pairs in sizes ten and above being needed for initial issue.  A telegram was sent to the Commanding General, Communications Zone, inviting attention to the priority for the issue of overshoes to reinforcement personnel.  Escape hatches for medium tanks become critical at this time and contracts for their manufacture were placed with French firms.

Friday – 15th December 1944:[54]

On the 15th, however, Third Army’s operational directive of 11th December beoame effeotive, and direoted that the Commanding General, III Corps, assumes command of the 6th Armored Division, the 42nd Infantry Division, upon its arrival at Metz, and temporary command of the 6th Cavalry Group (Reinforced).  It further direoted that III Corps, (1) continue its present missions in Metz; (2) maintain maximum pressure against the enemy in the assigned zone; (3) drive the enemy East of the Saar River within the Corps zone on comletion of refitting the 26th Infantry Division and an Army order; (4) seize and secure a bridgehead across the Saar River in the Corps zone on Army order; and (5) advance Northeast and seize Neunkirchen on Army Order.

The 6th Armored Division and Task Force Fiokett (6th Cavalry Group) were engaged in patrolling in their respective zones.  Corps directed that they continue to patrol and exert maximum pressure against the enemy.

Friday – 15th December 1944:[55]

III Corps became operational 15th December.

Friday – 15th December 1944:[56]

Batteries busy cleaning guns and materiel.  Colonial Davis to attend conference at 1930 at Century.  Conference postpone.  Major Clark returned to Battalion CP after inspecting “B” Battery at 1700.

Friday – 15th December 1944:[57]

The Battalion was relieved of attachment to XX Corps and attaché to 183rd Field Artillery Group, III Corps.

Friday – 15th December 1944:[58]

The Battalion less Battery “B” was attached to the 183rd Field Artillery Group with the mission of supporting the III Corps’ holding attack along the front from Saarguimines on the south to Saarlouis on the north.

Thursday – 16th December 1944:[59]

Spearheaded by elements of the hoarded Sixth SS Panzer Army, the enemy opened a counteroffensive in the VIII and VII Corps zones of the First U.S. Army.  On the Third U.S Army front, the enemy remained wholly defensive in the III Corps zone and fought strong delaying actions from dominating ground, wooded areas and towns in the XII Corps zone.  He slackened resistance in the Dillingen (Dillingen/Saar, Germany) (Q28) bridgehead in the XX Corps zone and continued his stiff opposition in the Fraulautern (Fraulautern, Saarwellingen, Germany) (Q28) – Ensdorf (Q37) bridgehead areas.

Maintaining their position, the 6th Armored Division and Task Force Fickett continued active patrolling in the III Corps zone.  An attack late in the period was launched by the 6th Armored Division to exert pressure on the enemy in its zone.  The 26th Infantry Division remained at Metz (U85), while the 42nd Infantry Division was expected to start its movement to the Metz (U85) area on 18th December.

In the XII Corps zone the 87th Infantry Division continued to attack north with the 345th Infantry, which relieved the 346th Infantry, and cleared Erching (France) (Q65), eight miles east of Sarreguenimes (France) (Q55).  The 347th Infantry made a one and one-half mile advance to the vicinity of Walsheim (Germany) (Q66).  Meanwhile, the 134th Infantry (35th Infantry Division) gained three-quarters of a mile in the woods five miles northeast of Sarreguenimes (France) (Q55), while the 320th Infantry cleared Gersheim (Germany) (Q66) on the Sarreguemines-Hombourg (France-Germany) railroad.  For the first time in the Third U.S. Army campaign tank destroyers knocked out three locomotives.  The 4th Armored Davison continued its south flank patrols while the 80th Infantry Division moved into an assembly area.

Thursday – 16th December 1944:[60]

On 16th December, information was recoeived from Third Army indicating an enemy withdrawal in the Corps zone and the 6th Armored Division was therefore directed to be prepared to at tack on the morning of the 17th with sufficient force to exploit any enemy withdrawal.  The attaok did not materialize as such, however, because, the 6th Armored Division found, contrary to reports, that the enemy was not withdrawing — but reinforcing.  Both the 6th Armored Division and the 6th Cavalry Group continued to maintain pressure on the enemy, who was defensive, but who reacted strongly to any effort to penetrate his positions.  Enemy activity during these three days consisted primarily to improving defensive positions, counter-reconnaissance missions, and harassing mortar and artillery tire.  Major units in contact were the enemy 559th Grenadier Division, 347th Infantry Division, and the 36th Grenadier Division.

The 26th Division remained in Metz and on 16th December received 2,585 replacements to train as riflemen.

Thursday – 16th December 1944:[61]

In preparation for the Bulge, the XII Corps started to place the 80th Infantry and 4th Armored in line abreast of the 87th Infantry Division.  The III Corps, consisting of the 26th and 6th Armored Divisions,

which had become operational 15th December, initiated a reconnaissance with a view to passing through the 35th Infantry Division, XII Corps, immediately subsequent to the blitz.

Saturday – 16th December 1944:

Battle Of The Bulge starts today, see Luxembourg Map.

Saturday – 16th December 1944:[62]

Battalion Commander, S-3 and Battery Commanders left at 0645 on reconnaissance for new positions.  Returned 1630.

Sunday – 17th December 1944:[63]

Attacking to the northwest, the 6th Armored Division in the III Corps zone reached an area just south of Lixing (Lixing-lès-Rouhling, France) (Q46, four miles northwest of Sarreguenimes (France) (Q55), while Task Force Pickett exercised vigorous patrolling.  The 26th Infantry Division continued regrouping and training in the Metz (Q85) area.

On the southeast of XII Corps zone, the 4th Armored Division made local advances near Epping-Ureach (Q65), eleven miles east of Sarreguenimes (France) (Q55), while immediately to the north in the 87th Infantry Division zone the 345th Infantry made a one mile advance to the outskirts of Seyweiler (Seyweiler, Gersheim, Germany) (Q66), seven miles southwest of Zweibrücken (Germany) (Q77), and the 347th Infantry advanced one mile and cleared the woods north of Walsheim (Q66), which is one and one-half miles west of Gehweiler (Gehweiler, Wadern, Germany) (Q66).  The 80th Infantry Division continued its movement to an assembly area in vicinity of Bixing (Q64)

Sunday – 17th December 1944:[64]

On 17th December Headquarters and Headquarters Battery, III Corps Artillery, was relieved from attachment to XX Corps and moved to Merlebuch (Merlebach, Freyming, France) (8 miles Southwest of Saarbrucken (Germany)).

Sunday – 17th December 1944:[65]

0830 – HQ Battery left Metz for new position at Sengbach – (3433-5750) by motor convoy arriving at 1035.  Distance traveled: 28 miles.  Weather:  clear.  Morale: excellent.

1000 – Battalion commander and advance party left Battalion CP at Metz for new position, arriving at 1120.

1125 – Communications (Wire) established with 183rd Field Artillery Group.

1300 – Battalion CP and Message Center established.

1400 – “A” & “C” Batteries left Metz by serials.

1600 – Survey Detail reported to FDC with field survey completed.

1630 – Base piece, Battery “A” arrived in position.

1800 – “A” & “C” Batteries reported complete arrival with guns in position.

2300 – Communication (wire) with “A” & “C” Batteries established.

Sunday – 17th December 1944:[66]

The Battalion was detached from XX Corps and attached to III Corps.

Sunday – 17th December 1944:[67]

The Battalion moved (less “B” Battery) to Seingbouisse (vIQ34335750) where it went into position with the mission of general support of the III Corps.

Sunday – 17th December 1944:[68]

The Battalion less Battery “B” move from Metz to the vicinity of Seingbousse (vIQ342575) and occupied positions there.

Sunday – 17th December 1944:[69]

The Battalion departed Metz France.

Sunday – 17th December 1944:[70]

The Battalion arrived Seingbouse, France.  The Battalions firing its first rounds from the new 155mm M1A1 Long Toms into the Forbach-Saar-Bruken sector of Germany.

Monday – 18th December 1944:[71]

Along the VIII Corps front and on the majority of the 7th Corps front in the First U.S. Army zone, the heavy enemy counterattack which had been developed for several days reached an acute stage.  The attack made by a strong force of enemy units, initially consisting of approximately fifteen divisions, in addition to those previously identified in the sector, was generated by Sixth SS Panzer Army, under the guidance of General Von Rundstidt, commander of all enemy forces on the Western Front.  Penetrations by this time had been made into zone of VIII Corps (which then consisted of the 106th, 28th, 4th Infantry Division and the 9th Armored Division) and into the 99th Infantry Division of V corps.  This penetration of approximately forty miles in depth and thirty miles in with was made along the St. Vith (Belgium) (P88) – St. Hubert (Saint-Hubert, Belgium) (P36) axis, with the flanks anchored in the south on  (Echternach Luxembourg) (L03), Diekirch (Luxembourg) (P84) and Ettelbruck (Luxembourg) (P84) and in the north on Monschau (Germany) (X91), Malmedy (Belgium) (K70), Stavelot (Belgium) (K70) and Marche (Marche-en-Famenne, Belgium) (P29).  Information at this time from the VIII Corps was scant as to the tactical situation, but the conclusion was reached, however, that the situation was very fluid and that the combat efficiency of VIII Corps, consisting mainly of the divisions mentioned above, was unknown.  This created a tactical situation that was extremely critical for the Allied Forces along the Western Front.

To combat this penetration and disrupting counter-offensive in the First U.S. Army zone, the Supreme Commander issued orders through the Commanding General of Twelfth U.S. Army Group that Commanding General of Third U.S. Army assume command of VIII Corps troops south of the enemy break-through, which could be regrouped and committed, and to attack north to drive, cut off and destroy the enemy which had penetrated the First U.S. Army zone.

The Army Commander, in order to place the Third U.S. Army into high gear against the enemy penetration and to swing its main effort from the east to the north, issued the following orders to the corps under his command:

XII Corps was ordered to relinquish operational control of its assigned zone to the Seventh U.S. Army, passed control of the 80th Infantry Division and attached troops and of the 4th Armored Division and attached troops to the III Corps, and relinquish control of the 87th Infantry Division and attached troops to the Seventy U.S. Army.  After being relieved by Seventh U.S. Army units, the corps was to withdraw the 35th Infantry Division and attached troops and XII Corps troops from their zone to the vicinity of Metz (U85).  On completion of this relief and transfers the corps was to move the remainder of the corps, less attachments to the Seventh U.S. Army to the vicinity of Luxembourg (P81) and assume control of the 5th Infantry Division and attached troops.

III Corps was ordered to relinquish responsibility of the corps zone to the XX Corps.  It was to pass control of the 6th Armored Division and the 6th Cavalry Group (reinforced) to XX Corps, move the 26th Infantry Division and attached troops to the Arlon (Belgium) (P62) area, move to the vicinity of Arlon (Belgium) (P62) and assume control of the 4th Armored Division and attached troops and of the 80th Infantry Division and attached troops upon their arrival.

XX Corps was ordered to assume responsibility of III Corps zone, assume control of the 6th Armored Division and attached troops and the 6th Cavalry Group (reinforced), relieve the 5th Infantry Division in the Saarlauzern (Q28) bridgehead and the 5th Infantry Division and attached troops to the vicinity of Luxembourg (P81)

Reacting sharply to patrol activity, the enemy continued to maintain a defensive attitude in III Corps zone.  He continued to fight strong delaying motions in the XII Corps zone, but decreased his resistance in the bridgehead area of XX Corps zone.

The 6th Armored division continued to be heavily engaged with the enemy with no particular change in the situation in the III Corps zone.  Task Force Fickett continued to patrol aggressively in the vicinity of Karlsbrunn (Germany) (Q36), eight miles southwest of Saarbrücken (Germany) (Q47).  III Corps assumed command of the 4th Armored Division and the 80th Infantry Division, which started immediate movement to the vicinity of Longwy, France (P00).

Elements of the 345th Infantry (87th Infantry Division), operating on the XII Corps south boundary, cleared Medelsheim (Germany) (Q66), eight miles southeast of Zweibrücken (Germany) (Q77).  This town had previously been by-passed, resulting in other elements of the division being in Seyweiler (Seyweiler, Gersheim, Germany) (Q66) one mile to the north.  Leading elements of the 347th Infantry (87th Infantry Division) continued fighting on the high ground one-half mile south of Bliesdalheim (Germany) (Q66), seven miles southwest of Zweibrücken (Germany) (Q77).  Meanwhile, in a zone just to the west, the 35th Infantry Division continued pushing ahead against stiffening enemy resistance, with the 320th Infantry gaining one-half mile south of Bebelsheim (Bebelsheim, Mandelbachtal, Germany) (Q56) and the 137th Infantry clearing the woods southeast of Bebelsheim (Bebelsheim, Mandelbachtal, Germany) (Q56) and attacking Bliesmengen (Bliesmengen-Bolchen, Mandelbachtal, Germany) (Q56), three miles northeast of Sarreguemines (France) (Q55).  The 80th Infantry Division closed in the south part of the corps zone in the rear and prepared to move out under III Corps, while the 4th Armored Division was being relieved of its responsibilities on its front.  The zone vacated by the III Corps was assumed by the XIII Corps which gained temporary control of the 6th Armored Division and Task Force Fickett until 20th December at which time XX Corps took over operational control.

The 378th Infantry (95th Infantry Division) continued fighting in the Ensdorf (Ensdorf (Saar), Ensdorf, Germany) (Q37) bridgehead with no advances reported, while the 377th Infantry closed in the vicinity of Hargarten (Germany) (Q17), six miles northeast of Boulay-Moselle (France) (Q06).  Meanwhile the 5th Infantry Division was fighting heavily in the bridgehead areas of Fraulautern (Fraulautern, Saarwellingen, Germany) (Q38) and Saarlautern Roden (Roden, Saarlouis, Germany) (Q38), with local advances made in both towns.  The Commanding General of the 5th Infantry Division took over command of the XX Corps bridgehead area on 18th December, completely relieving the 95th Infantry Division.  Dillingen (Dillingen/Saar, Germany) (Q28) was being mopped up by the 90th Infantry Division, with ferrying operations continuing to bring supplies and material across the Saar River.  Task Force Polk continued its patrolling on the corps north flank.

Monday – 18th December 1944:[72]

On 18th December, as the Corps staff was preparing its plans for future operations and for displacement of the Command Post to a more forward location, information was received of the German breakthrough in the First Army zone.  Later in the evening, the Commanding General, III Corps, and the chiefs of general staff sections were called to a conference at Headquarters Third Army in Nancy.  At 2200 the Chief of Staff, III Corps, received instructions from the Corps Commander to move the Corps Headquarters to Longwy the following morning, and it was assumed then that the Corps was to be employed against the German offensive.

Meanwhile approximately 3,000 replacements had been received by the 26th Division through the 48th Replacement Battalion, and a large number of these had been absorbed by the division; the remainder were assigned to other units within Third Army.

Monday – 18th December 1944:[73]

Patton then telephoned the Chief of Staff 3rd Army and directed that the attack of the 4th Armored and 80th Infantry Divisions be halted and sufficient transportation to move the 80th Division any time after dawn of the 19th be collected.  That the 4th Armored Division be prepared to move the night 18th-19th December.  One combat Command of the 4th Armored moved at midnight on Longwy (France), followed by remainder of division at dawn.  The 80th Infantry started to move on Luxembourg at dawn 19th December.

Monday – 18th December 1944:[74]

0830 – Battalion Commander and party left for OP arriving there at 0900.

1000 – Battery “A” registered on Check Point 1 and 2: expending 47 rounds ammo on Check Point 1 and 17 rounds on Check Point 2.  These were the first 244th FA Battalions guns to fire on German soil.

1025 – Battery “C” registered on Check Point 1 and 2; expending 34 rounds ammo on Check Point 1 and 11 rounds on Check Point 2.

1100 – “D’ Battery (Hq. Battery.) communications established although guns not in position.

1230 – S-2 left to locate new forward OP’s.

1300 – “D” Batter (HQ. Battery.) (8.8 Pak How) went into position and ready to fire.  No ammunition available.

1630 – Battalion commander and party returned from OP.

1645 – S-2 returned to FDC.

1700 – 2400 – “A” Battery fired 10 harassing missions; expending 35 rounds ammo.

Tuesday – 19th December 1944:[75]

III Corps started moving the 26th Infantry Division from Metz (U85) to an area northeast of Arlon (Belgium) (Q62) while the 4th Armored Division and the 80th Infantry Division continued movement to the vicinity of Arlon (Belgium) (P62) and Luxembourg (Q81), respectively.

XIII Corps, still utilizing the 6th Armored Division and Task Force Fickett, took over temporary control of III Corps zone in addition to its own.  The 87th Infantry Division, on the south flank maintained and consolidated its front lines.  Heavy artillery fire was directed at the 347th infantry on the high ground one-half mile south of Bliesdalued (Q66), seven miles southeast of Zweibrucken (Zweibrücken, Germany) (Q77).  The 35th Infantry Division also maintained and consolidated its position, with the 134th Infantry two miles northwest of Gersheim (Germany) (Q66), the 137th Infantry in the vicinity of Bliesmengen (Bliesmengen-Bolchen, Mandelbachtal, Germany) (Q56), three mile southeast of Sarrecuewines (Q55), and the 320th Infantry astride the Sarreguemines-Hombourg (France-Germany) (Q55) railroad, one-half mile north of Gersheim (Germany) (Q66).

Artillery with the Army was extensively regrouped to support offensive operations on the northern front.  Attached to III Corps were one field artillery group, two light, three medium and one heavy battalion detached from XII Corps and two field artillery groups, one light and one medium battalion detached from XX Corps.  In addition, one field artillery observation battalion newly arrived on the Continent and assigned to Third U.S. Army attached III corps.  All commenced to move immediately and closed in the vicinity of the III Corps artillery assembly area at Villers (U69) during the night of 19th -20th December.  III Corps artillery which passed intact to the control of XII Corps included, in addition to the 6th Armored Division’s organic artillery, one field artillery group, one field artillery observation battalion, one light, one medium and one heavy battalion.

Tuesday – 19th December 1944:[76]

On the morning of 19th December, the Commanding General, Chief of Staff, G-2 and G-3, of III Corps left Metz for Luxembourg to attend a conference at Headquarters Twelfth Army Group, and the forward echelon of Corps departed for Longwy (France).  The 80th Infantry and 4th Armored Divisions were attached to III Corps by verbal instructions of the Commanding General, Third Army.  Neither of these divisions was engaged at the time, both having been relieved in the line shortly before the beginning of the German offensive.  During the morning, of the 19th,in accordance with instructions received by the Divisions from Headquarters Third Army, they began their movement from the XII Corps zone to the North.  The 26th Infantry Division which remained under III Corps control, was still in Metz where it had recently absorbed approximately 2,400 replacements from III Corps Infantry Replacement Training Center, and where it was conducting training.

At 1100 Corps Headquarters at Longwy (France) moved immediately to Luxembourg; the 80th Infantry and 4th Armored Divisions were relieved from attachment to III Corps; and the 9th and 10th Armored and 4th Infantry Divisions were attached to the Corps.  As the Corps was moving into its school house headquarters in Luxembourg at 1600, Major General Leven C. Allen, Chief of Staff, Twelfth Army Group notified the Commanding General, III Carps that the Corps Headquarters was to move to Arlon, Belgium next morning; that, as originally planned, the 26th Infantry, 80th Infantry and 4th Armored Divisions were to be attached to the III Corps instead of the 9th and 10th Armored and 4th Infantry Divisions.  The Corps staff consequently began to make plans for the displacement to Arlon, and for the coming offensive.

Eleven field artillery battalions, all of which were at the time actively engaged, and three tank destroyer battalions (attached to divisions) were attached to Corps by Third Army.  At 1745 those battalions were on the road, expecting to close in assembly area vicinity of Villers (Villers-la-Montagne, France) the following day.

During the night Corps was directed by Third Army to attack on the morning of the 22nd.  This attack was designed to hit the enemy on his Southern flank and to open a corridor to Bastogne where the 101st Airborne Division, reinforced, continued to hold out against enemy assaults.

Tuesday – 19th December 1944:[77]

The XII Corps (General Eddy) to be assembled in vicinity of Luxembourg consisting of 35th, 4th and 5th Infantry Divisions, and elements of the 9th and 10th Armored Divisions .  The XX Corps (General Walker) in vicinity of Thoinville – 90th and 95th Infantry Divisions, 6th Armored Division when relieved by 7th Army, and Task Force Polk.

After meeting at Verdun, Patton called Chief of Staff 3rd Army on phone and gave following instructions: 26th Infantry Division to be moved 20th December to vicinity of Arlon (Belgium), advanced detachments to move at once.  The XII Corps to disengage, and Corps Headquarters and artillery to move to vicinity of Luxembourg 21st of December, leaving a working headquarters at old location until such time as it could be relieved by XV Corps, 7th Army.

Tuesday – 19th December 1944:[78]

Eleven field artillery battalions, all of which were at the time actively engaged, and three tank destroyer battalions (attached to divisions) were attached to III Corps by Third Army.  At 1745 those battalions were on the road, expecting to close in assembly area vicinity of Villers (France) the following day.

III Corps

————————————————————–

XII Corps

Tuesday – 19th December 1944:[79]

The Battalion was detached from III Corps and attached to XII Corps.[80]

Tuesday – 19th December 1944:[81]

The Battalion (less “B” Battery) was relieved of attachment to III Corps and attached to XII Corps.  Battery “B” was relieved of attachment to XX Corps and attached to XII Corps, returning to this Battalion.

Tuesday – 19th December 1944:[82]

0745 – Complete survey of gun positions forward to 183rd FA Group.

1140 – Overlay showing map location of OP’s (Visibility Chart) forward to 183rd FA Group S-2.

0830 – 2400 – “A” and “C” Batteries combine fire twenty-four missions as follows:  12 Harassing; 2 TOT’s; 2 S & F and 8 others – expending 126 rounds ammunition.  Battalion relieved from attachment to XX Corps an attached to XII Corps per Troop Assignment No. A-76, Headquarters, Third U.S Army, Date 20th December 1944.  Battery “B” relieved from special assignment and returned to Metz where they are checking their guns preparatory to joining the Battalion.

Wednesday – 20th December 1944:[83]

The Army Commander gave the various Corps Commanders the new mission of Third U.S. Army.  This directive stated in part:

“1. a. Enemy armored columns penetrated the First U.S Army front in the Malmedy (Belgium) (K70) and Bastogne (P55) areas and threaten the vital Namur (J91) – Liege (K42) communications centers.

b. First U.S. Army will attack south and restore the front in the Malmedy (Belgium) (K70) area and destroy the enemy in zone.

“2. Third U.S. Army will change direction and will attack to the north from the area Luxembourg (P81) – Arlon (Belgium) (P62) to destroy the enemy on its front and be prepared to change direction to the northeast and seize crossings of the Rhine River.

“3. III Corps (26th and 80th Infantry Divisions, 4th Armored Division and attached troops) will:

a. Attack north in zone on Army order in the direction St. Vith (Belgium) (P88) and destroy the enemy on its front.

b. Maintain contact with XII Corps on east and with VIII Corps on west.

“4. XII Corps (4th and 5th Infantry Divisions, 10th Armored Division less Combat Command “B”, plus  Combat Command “A” 9th Armored Division, 2nd Cavalry Group and attached troops) will:

a. Hold west bank of Moselle River in zone.

b. On Army order, attack initially north on the right of III Corps and destroy enemy in zone.

c. Push aggressive patrols to east and northeast to determine location of crossings of Sauer River and Our River and strength of enemy in Echternach (Luxembourg) (L03) area.  Be prepared on Army order to change direction of attack to the northeast to force crossings and penetrate Siegfried Line in zone and advance in direction of Bitburg (Germany) (L15).

d. Maintain contact with XX Corps on south and III Corps on west.

e. Protect right (east) flank of Third U.S. Army.

“5. VIII Corps (101st Airborne Division, 28th Infantry Division, 9th Armored Division, less Combat Command “A”, plus Combat Command “B” 10th Armored Division and attached troops) will:

a. Continue defense of zone.

b. Regroup forces in zone prepared to attack north on Army order to destroy enemy in zone.

c. Maintain contact with III Corps on east.

“6. XX Corps (95th and 90th Infantry Divisions, 6th Armored Division, 3rd Cavalry Group, 6th Cavalry Group (reinforced) and attached troops will:

a. Defend Saarlautern (Saarlouis, Germany) (Q28) bridgehead.

b. Hold and defend present front lines.

c. Pass to Seventh U.S. Army control of zones now held by 6th Armored Division and 6th Cavalry Group (reinforced).

d. On relief of 6th Armored Division and 6th Cavalry Group (reinforced), assemble 6th Armored Division in area from which it will be prepared to counterattack in any direction in Third or Seventh U.S. Army zones.

e. Be prepared to pass control of 6th Cavalry Group (reinforced) to III Corps.

f. Maintain contact with XII Corps and Seventh U.S. Army.

g. Protect southeast flank Third U.S. Army.

“7. In the attack, all corps will advance in multiple columns, all columns to be composed of tanks and infantry.

“8. III Corps will attack 21 December (attack actually began on 22 December), XII Corps and VIII Corps will attack on Army order.

“9 a. The following air support will be provided for this operation:

(1) Heavy bombers by Eighth U.S. Air Force.

(2) Medium bombers by Ninth U.S. Bomber Division.

(3) Seven fighter-bomber groups, one tactical reconnaissance group and one night fighter squadron by XIX Tactical Air Command.

b. Air support missions will be requested through Commanding General, XIX Tactical Air Command.”  As seen by the above operational directive, VIII Corps in its new mission was to consist or the 101st Airborne Division, then in the isolated Bastogne (Belgium) (P55) area, which had attached Reserve Combat Command of the 9th Armored Division and Combat Command “B” of the 10th Armored Division Combat Command “B” of the 9th Armored Division which was located in the zone of the First U.S. Army and the 28th Infantry Division.  The remainder of the units previously under VIII Corps, First U.S. Army, were committed, as quickly as they could be regrouped, to other corps of the Third U.S. Army.

Tactical Echelon of Third U.S. Army Headquarters moved to Luxembourg (P81) to direct the action in ti1e enemy break-through area.

III Corps set up its Command Post in the vicinity of Arlon (Belgium) (P62) at 1200 20th December and continued assembling its major elements preparing to advance to the north.  The 26th Infantry Division was established at Eischen (Luxembourg) (P62), the 80th Infantry Division at Dommeldange (Luxembourg) (P81) while the 4th Armored Division closed in an assembly area west of Arlon (Belgium) (P02).

The 6th Armored Division patrolled aggressively along the front from Sarreguemines (France) (Q55) to Forbaoh (France) (Q46) in the XII Corps zone, while the 35th Infantry Division established strong defensive positions immediately east of Sarrenguemines (France) (Q55).  Control over that zone passed at 202400 to XV Corps at which time the Command Echelon of XII Corps started movement to Luxemburg (P81).  The 87th Infantry Division started relief of the 35th Infantry Division in zone.

Wednesday – 20th December 1944:[84]

The Commanding General 10th Armored Division was directed to take temporary command of XII Corps pending arrival of that Headquarters.  Also to incorporate in his unit one CC of the 9th Armored Division in the vicinity of Luxembourg.  The Commanding General of the 9th Armored Division with his Headquarters was sent to VIII Corps to take over command of two combat commands of the 9th Armored and one combat command of the 10th Armored Division.

Wednesday – 20th December 1944:[85]

0001 to 1014 – “A” and “C” Batteries Combined fire 30 missions as follows:  24 harassing, 2 TOT’s, 1 S&F, 3 other missions – expending 64 rounds ammunition.

1130 – Battery “C” fired 1 mission – target; locomotive expending 30 rounds ammo.  Battery “C” fired 4 rounds.

1330 – Battery “D” registered on Check Point No. 5; expending 13 rounds ammunition.

1520 – 2400 Battery “A” and Battery “C” combine fired 20 missions as follows:  9 harassing missions; 2 registrations (check points): Ammunition expended:  231 rounds.

Thursday – 21st December 1944:[86]

Enemy advances continued in VIII Corps zone, with penetration being made as far west as St. Hubert (Saint-Hubert, Belgium) (P36) and Moircy (Moircy, Libramont-Chevigny, Belgium) (P35) after the enemy had bypassed Bastogne (Belgium) (P55).  Enemy elements were reported in the south edge of Bastogne (Belgium) (P55), with the remainder of the city virtually cut off.  The entire XX Corps front was quiet.  Enemy air activity took a sudden rise when thirty-nine aircraft attempted Army installations in a series of raids.  Antiaircraft units claimed eight planes destroyed and three probably destroyed.

III Corps, established in the vicinity of Arlon (Belgium) (P62), was prepared to attack on the sough flank of the enemy salient.  Late in the period an attack was launched, with the 26th Infantry Division gaining from three to four miles while the 80th Infantry Division captured Merzig (Germany) (P73), and enveloped Ettelbruck (Luxembourg) (P84).  Combat Command “A” (4th Armored Division) to the right rear of Combat Command “B”, gained three miles after being halted by a blown bridge, while Combat Command “B” (4th Armored Division) advanced fire miles.

XII Corps moved its headquarters to Luxembourg (P81) and prepared to attack to the north toward the salient.  It assumed operational control of the 4th, 5th, and 35th Infantry Divisions, the 10th Armored Division (less Combat Command “B” plus Combat command “A”, 9th Armored Division) and the 2nd Cavalry Group.  However, the 35th Infantry Division was directed to go to Metz (U85) for refitting before moving to the Luxembourg (P81) area.

Thursday – 21st December 1944:[87]

0900 – Battalion Commander, S-3, S-2 and Battery Commanders with their parties left Battalion CP on advance reconnaissance to new position area in the vicinity of Luxembourg.

2200 – Agent left CP for 183rd FA Group for order of movement of Battalion.

2300 – Agent returned to CP and all acting Battery Commanders were given instructions on  movement by Battalion Executive.

0001 – 2236 – “A”, “C” and “D” Batteries combined fired 32 missions as follows:  13 harassing; 5 TOT and 14 others, expending 296 rounds ammunition.

Thursday – 21st December 1944:[88]

The Battalion commander with and advance party moved to Luxembourg upon the order of the Commanding Officer, 183rd Field Artillery Group.

Friday – 22nd December 1944:[89]

Enemy operations stiffened in the III Corps zone and several local counterattacks were launched.  The enemy continued his efforts to capture Bastogne (Belgium) (P55) and was reported regrouping his forces for a fresh assault.  Elsewhere in VIII Corps zone there was little activity, indicating the impetus of the enemy’s thrust was somewhat expended.  Pressure was continued by the enemy against the shoulder of the southern salient in the XII Corps zone, numerous small attacks being launched in the Echternach (Luxembourg) (L03) area in an attempt to enlarge his bridgehead south of the Saure River.  The enemy maintained his defensive attitude in the XX corps area, using some artillery fire.  Enemy air activity continued on an increasing scale, eight-nine planes making seventh-eight raids on this date.  An attack on a supply point at Mancieulles (France) (U67) destroyed 100,000 gallons of gasoline.  Antiaircraft units claimed eight planes destroyed and one probably destroyed.  Dissemination to all corps and divisions of detailed information concerning German operating in American uniforms and equipment was completed.  Unnecessary civilian traffic was cleared from roads.  The Provost Marshal was directed to clear at his discretion any main supply route except for the most essential civilian traffic.

A TWX was received from Twelfth U.S. Army Group which confirmed verbal orders previously issued, set up new boundaries between Twelfth U.S. Army Group and 21 Army Group British, and between Sixth and Twelfth U.S. Army Groups.  The TWX stated in part:

“1.  Portion of Letter of Instructions in conflict herewith are cancelled.  Pending publication of a new directive, the following instructions are issued for your information and guidance.

“2. Boundaries: A. Between Twenty One and Twelfth Army Group:  Givet – Prum – Koln (All inclusive to Twenty One Army Group) Subject modifications between Army Commanders concerned.

B. Between Twelfth and Sixth Army Goups:  As at present to Neufchateau (inclusive to Sixth Army Group) – the two Dombasle – Chateau Salins – Baronville – Faulquemont (Falkenberg – St. Avold – Carling (Karlingen) – Bousse (Buss) – (all inclusive to Twelfth Army Group, with running rights to Sixth Army Group on the road west of this boundary (Neunkirchen – Landstunl – Kaiserslautern) all inclusive to Sixth Army Group).  Third Army retains running rights in that area east of above and west of former boundary which lies behind front line.

“3. A. First and Ninth Armies pass to operational control of Commander in Chief, Twenty One Army Group  at once.  Twelfth Army Group retains responsibility for their supply and administration.

B. Hold along present front line between Saarlautern and Vicinity of Echternach; contain the enemy’s advance east of the Meuse; launch without delay a counter-offensive against the southern flank of the enemy salient from general area Luzembourg – Arlon in direction of St. Vith.

“4. Troops:  Third Army will be as now constituted less 87th Infantry Division (to Sixth Army Group) plus Headquarters VIII Corps, 4th and 28th Infantry Divisions, 9th Armored Division, 101st Airborne Division, and First Army and Corps troops now south of Army Group boundary (details later).

“5. Coincident with 3A about, operational control of Ninth and Two Ninth TAC will pass from Ninth Ari Force to Second TAF.”

XII Corps, composed at this time of the 4th, 5th and 35th Infantry Divisions and the 10th Armored Division, was prepared to attack heavily in a zone running roughly from Ettelbruck (P84) due north of Luxembourg (P81) to Echternach (L03) and thence, south to Wormeldangen (L01), east of Luxembourg (P81).  The 10th Infantry or the 5th Infantry Division was attached to the 4th Infantry Division and moved north through elements of the 12th and 22nd Infantry Regiments (4th Infantry Division), advancing 1,000 yards against heavy resistance.  A line running roughly from a point four miles southwest of Echternach (L03) to Wormeldangen (L01) was held by the 4th Infantry Division, which made only local gains along this front. Meanwhile, the 10th Armored Division had Combat Command “A” at Imbringen ( P82) , five miles northeast of Luxembourg ( P81) , with the Reserve Combat Command enroute to Nommern (P83), twelve miles north of Luxembourg (P81).  Combat Command “A” of the 9th Armored Division (attached to 10th Armored Division) was holding a line beginning two miles south of Ettelbruck (P84), sixteen miles north of Luxembourg (P81), and stretching eight miles to the east to Waldbilling (P93), three miles west of Echternace (L03).  Assembly in the corps zone was completed by the 5th Infantry Division, less the 10th Infantry Regiment.

The 90th Infantry Division completed its withdrawal to the west bank or the Saar River in XX Corps zone, while in the 95th Infantry Division the 377th and 379th Infantry Regiments continued to maintain their bridgehead areas across the Saar River at Saarlautern (Q28) with other elements holding positions along the west bank of the river.  A strong counterattack in the vicinity of Bous (Q27) was repulsed by the 95th Infantry Division.  The 6th Armored Division maintained its positions.

Friday – 22nd December 1944:[90]

Bastogne was still holding out.  The 10th Infantry Regiment of the 5th Division, XII Corps, attacked NE on Echternauch (Echternach, Grevenmacher, Luxembourg), driving the enemy towards the river.

Friday – 22nd December 1944:[91]

The Battalion departed Seingbouse France.  At that time the German Ardennes Offensive (Battle of the Bulge) had begun and the Battalion was ordered to move from the Saar Basin to Biwer Luxembourg and advance forward to contain the southern hinge of the battle.

Friday – 22nd December 1944:[92]

0500 – Close Station; March Order given by Battalion Executive.

0900 – Battalion CP Closed.

1130 – Battalion less ‘B” Battery left Sengbuch by motor convoy to new positions located at Biwer, Luxembourg (Wl0124).  Distance marched 93 miles.  Moral: Excellent.  Rear Echelon locate at St. Avold joined Battalion convoy for movement to new position.  1st Platoon, Battery “B”, 457th AAA Battery attached to Battalion upon arrival at new position.  Battalion released from attachment to 183rd Field Artillery Group and attaché to 177th field Artillery Group, XII Corps Artillery in general support of XII Corps.

1700 – “A” and “C” Batteries bivouacked outside city limits of Luxembourg for night before going into position.  H Battery continued to new positions establishing Fire Direction Center at Biwer, Luxembourg (L01862492), at 2100 hours.

5)     Friday – 22nd December 1944:[93]

The Battalion move to Biwer, Luxembourg (UIL 0124) and was relieved of attachment to 183rd Field Artillery Group and attached to 177th Field Artillery Group with the mission of general support of the XII Corps attack.

Friday – 22nd December 1944:[94]

The Battalion less Battery “B” went into position in the vicinity of Biwer, Luxembourg (UIL 0124) with the mission of general support of XII Corps.

Saturday – 23rd December 1944:[95]

The commanding General’s operational directive sent to corps commanders on this date stated in part:

“1. Mission:

a. The mission of VIII Corps as delineated in Operational Directive, this headquarters, dated 21st December 1944, remains unchanged.

b. In addition to the above mission, VIII Corps will immediately assume operational responsibility for the defense of the Meuse River line south of from Givet (09375) (Exclusive to Verdun (U2865) (Inclusive).

“2. Troops:

a. VIII Corps will immediately assume operational control of the following listed Com 2 units with attachments:

(1) 342nd Engineers GS Regt with 6 Howitzers of 115th FA Battalion, attached.

(2) 392nd Engineers GS Regt with 115th FA Battalion (less 6 howitzers) attached.

(3) 366th Engineers GS Regt with 6 Guns of AT Co. 118th Infantry attached.

(4) 1308th Engineer GS Regt with AT Co. 118th Infantry (less 6 Guns) attached.

(5) Three Battalions French Infantry, available for defense of sector Givet – Mouzon (P0715) both inclusive.  Three additional Battalions French Infantry available for defense of sector Mouzon – Verdun.

b. Authority is granted for direct communication with Headquarters OISE Section Com 2 to facilitate assumption of control of these units.

c. On arrival in Reims area, the 11th Armored Division is attached to VIII corps for defense along the Meuse River south of Givet (Excl).

d. On arrival in Reims area, the 17th Airborne Division is attached to VIII corps for defense along the Meuse River line.

The 4th Infantry Division made slight gains against determined enemy resistance and heavy artillery fire in XII Corps zone.  The 10th Infantry (attached to the 4th Infantry Division) reverted to the 5th Infantry Division.  Reconnaissance elements of the 10th Armored Division advanced to approximately one mile south of Diekirch (P84), while the balance of the division together with the attached Combat Command “S” (9th Armored Division) maintained their position and prepared to attack in force.  Late in the period the 5th Infantry Division and the 10th Armored Division opened new attacks, with a forty-five minute artillery preparation, which were proceeding well at the end of the period.  To the rear at Metz (U85) the 35th Infantry Division was in an assembly area refitting.

Because of the threat to the Army’s rear areas in consequence of the fluid tactical situation the military police became a primary force in the maintenance of security and the apprehension of suspected spies and saboteurs.  To meet this need an emergency issue of 1,200 fragmentation hand grenades was made to military police.

A submarine bolt driving gun, for use in sealing the doors of pillboxes, was procured from the British Royal Navy.  Tests showed highly satisfactory results and twenty were procured for the Army’s use.

Saturday – 23rd December 1944:[96]

The weather fine.  Seven fighter-bomber groups, eleven medium bomber groups, and one division of the 8th Air Force and elements of the RAF were up in support of the 3rd Army.

Saturday – 23rd December 1944:[97]

CP opened at new location (L01862492) at 0200.  “A” Battery Guns went into position at (01432477) at 1000 hours.  “C” Battery Guns went into position at (01972430) at 1030 hours.  Radio communication established at 1100 hours.  Battalion Air Strip located at (l021235)

1445 – Able registered, expending five rounds of ammunition.

1900 – “C” Battery fire high burst expending 9 rounds ammunition.

1901 – 2400 – “A” and “C” Batteries combine fire seven H & I harassing missions.

Saturday – 23rd December 1944:[98]

The Battalion arrived Biwer Luxembourg.  The Battalion moved through heavy snow and rejoined by “B” Battery contained the southern hinge of the Bulge by firing across the Moselle and Sauer Rivers into Trier and the Echternache Sector of Germany.  The weather cleared and the Air Corps Heavy Bombers pounded the German positions.

Sunday – 24th December 1944:[99]

Order of Battle facts at this time showed that while the enemy so far had committed nine Panzer and fourteen infantry divisions in his offensive, he still possessed strong reserves and means to transport them.  It was considered that the enemy was capable of redisposing his forces and reinforcing them in an effort to regain lost momentum or in order to launch another powerful attack in the Echternach (Luxembourg) (L03) or Trier (Germany) (L22) – Merzig (Germany) (Q29) areas.  Opposing Third U.S. Army north of the Moselle River, it was estimated the enemy had eleven divisions of an effective combat strength totaling 68,500 troops.  Against Firs U.S. Army it was estimate he had eight divisions of an effective combat strength totaling 63,000 troops.

In the XII Corps zone the advance continued.  The 11th Infantry (5th Infantry Division) advanced to Haller (P93), six miles west of Echternach (Luxembourg) (L03), THE 2nd and 10th Infantry Regiments also making substantial gains in zone.  The 4th Infantry Division maintained its position while assembling and regrouping its forces.  With Combat Command “A” capturing Nostroff (P94), the 10th Armored division continued its advance to the north.  At this time the 35th Infantry Division, which had completed refitting at Metz (U85), was preparing to move north and assume a position on the front.  The enemy withdrew to the north bank of the Sauer River and offered spotty resistance in XII corps zone.

Artillery ammunition supply became increasingly critical in consequence of the movement of the great bulk of Third U.S. Army to the north.  Supply units followed with maximum speed but delay in their opening in the northern area was inescapable in view of the great distances and great amount of supplies involved,  for several days only one ammunition supply point was available to III, VIII, XII Corps so that stocks became extremely low.  The nearest Communication Zone depot available involved approximately a forty-hour round trip for the ammunition trains and was occasionally utilized in emergencies.  An ammunition dump containing 8,400 tons, which was in the Seventh U.S. Army’s zone as the result of the revision of boundaries, was turned over to that Army.  By agreement, critical items were removed for the use of Third U.S. Army forces until 27th December.

Snow camouflage of vehicles and tentage was a responsibility of the engineers.  Pattern painting of vehicles was accomplished by the use of the residue from the generation of acetylene gas, a lime-like substance found in dump piles in a dry state which, when mixed with water and applied with brushes, provided a white coat which was not injurious to material or canvas.

Sunday – 24th December 1944:[100]

The XII Corps cleared Sauer River from Diekirch (Luxembourg) inclusive to Echternach (Luxembourg) exclusive.

Sunday – 24th December 1944:[101]

0001 – 0800 – “A” and “C” Batteries combine fired 40 missions as follows:  38 H & I missions and 2 TOT’s, expending 80 rounds ammunition.

0815 – Battalion commander and S-2 left Battalion CP to establish forward OP’s returning at 1145, after establishing two forward OP”s.

1100 – Battery “B” arrived from Metz to join Battalion and went into position at (0232417).  Battalion relieve from attachment to 177th Field Artillery Group and attached to 422nd Field Artillery Group per VOCG, XII Corps Artillery.

1430 – Communication established with “B” Battery’s gun position.

1500 – S-2 left Battalion CP to visit S-2, 422nd Field Artillery Group.

1700 – S-2 returned to CP with enemy situation overlay.

1900 – “B” Battery registered (High Burst) expending 9 rounds ammunition.

2115 – “B” Battery registered (High Burst) expending 10 rounds ammunition.

0800 – 2400 – “B”, “A” and “C” combine fired 54 missions as follows:  41 (H & I); 8 registrations; 1 Pill Box (Personnel) and 4 others).  Cpl. Stephen A. Fabian, Battery “C” and Tec/5 Jarva O. Bostic, Hq. Battery, awarded Bronze Star for heroic action at Aveanches on the night of 7th & 8th August 1944 per GO 116, Headquarters, Third U.S. Army, dated 24th December 1944.  Battalion commander to present the award at a later date.

Sunday – 24th December 1944:[102]

Battery “B” joined the Battalion and went into position in Battalion Area vicinity of Biwer.  One gun from Battery “C” was move forward to a position at (108347) to fire H & I missions on the town of Bitburg (1353).

Monday – 25th December 1944:[103]

The Army Commander’s Christmas greeting to his officers and enlisted men was issued on this date, as follows:  “To each officer and soldier in the Third United States Army, I wish a Merry Christmas.  I have full confidence in your courage, devotion to duty, and skill in battle.  We march in our might to complete victory.  May God’s blessing rest upon each of you on this Christmas Day.

The enemy maintained an aggressive defense and improved this defensive position north of the Sauer River in the XII Corps zone.  Supported by elements of the 10th Armored Division, XII Corp’s attack to the north was continued by the 5th Infantry Division, with good progress being made.  In a zone west of Echternach (Luxembourg) (L03), Haller (P93) and Waldbilling (Luxembourg) (P93) were cleared, while Befort (Luxembourg) (P93) was encircled.  The 4th Infantry Division prepared to readjust its defensive positions, continuing to assemble and reorganize its troops.  Meanwhile, the 35th Infantry Division moved from Metz (U85) to take positions on the line.

Every means was used by the enemy to disrupt supply and communications in the rear areas of the Army.  A delay in the delivery of Class I and III supplies to the III Corps was caused by sabotage, the rail line between Longwy (France) (P50) and Arlon (Belgium) (P62) having been cut in five places.

Monday – 25th December 1944:

Exchanged the 6th Armored Division (XX Corps) with 10th Armored Division (XII Corps) effective tonight.  The 80th Infantry Division passes to XII Corps at 1800, the 26th.

Monday – 25th December 1944:[104]

0003 – Battery “B” reported gun crews’ strafed after completing harassing missions.  No casualties and no damage reported.

0001 – 2400 – Battery “A”, “B” and “C” combine fired 18 missions as follows:  4 Registrations; 14 H & I.

Tuesday – 26th December 1944:[105]

It was believed the enemy intended to hold and defend the southern flank of his salient from hasty entrenchments generally along the high ground on the north side of the Sauer and Sure River to (P54), thence northeast to St. Hubert (P36), employing mines, road blocks and blown bridges with tanks in mobile reserve to support these defenses.  The enemy offered spotty resistance to the 5th infantry Division in XII corps zone.

The Army commander sent Amendment NO 1 to the Operational Directive dated 21 December to the Commanding Generals of III, XII and XX Corps.  The amendment provided that III Corps pass control of the 89th Infantry Division and attached troops to XII Corps effective 2000 26th December.  The corps was to assume temporary control of Combat Command “A” (9th Armored Division) effective immediately, retain temporary control of the 318th Infantry until completion of its mission, and assume control of the 35th Infantry Division and attached troops.

XII Corps was to assume control of the 80th Infantry Division and attached troops effective at 2000 26 December.  It was to move Combat Command “A” (9th Armored Division) to III Corps area immediately, pass control of the 35th Infantry Division and attached troops to III Corps, pass control of the 10th Armored Division and attached troops to XX Corps, and assume control of the 6th Armored Division and attached Troops.

Positions directly in the rear of the 80th Infantry Division were assumed by the 35th Infantry Division, which prepared to pass through elements of the 80th Infantry Division, at which time the 80th Infantry Division would swing slightly to the east in XII Corps zone and leave the 35th Infantry Division under control of III Corps.  The 4th Infantry Division continued to assemble and prepare for renewal of its attack.  Continuing to attack, the 5th Infantry Division’s 2nd Infantry reached Berdorf (Luxembourg) (L03), two miles west of Echternach (Luxembourg) (L03).  Defort (Luxembourg) (P93), six miles to the northwest of Echternach (Luxembourg) (L03), was captured by the 11th Infantry.

Ammunition shipments continued to be diverted from the original southern flank to the original northern flank of the Army, with a steady buildup of tonnage being made in depots supporting the northern salient.

Tuesday – 26th December 1944:[106]

Combat Command “A”, 9th Armored Division, serving with 10th Armored Division in XII Corps joined to 4th Armored Division this morning and attacked west of CC “R” (Col. Blanchard) 4th Armored Division.

Tuesday – 26th December 1944:[107]

0001 – 2400 – Battery “A, “B” and “C” combine fired 21 missions as follows:  15 H & I; 4 TOT’s; 2 registrations on Check Point 2.

1400 – “A” Battery OP reported a man dressed in civilian clothes 400 yards from OP.

1800 – British flier walked into “A” Battery OP and stated that he had been shot down 22nd December northeast of Trier.  Sent to 410th Field Artillery Group for investigation.

Wednesday – 27th December 1944:

0001 – 0600 – Btry. “A”, “B” and “C” combined fired six harassing and missions expending 117 rounds of ammunition.

0920 – Survey Operations overlay Nos. 6, 7, 8 and 9 showing available survey control on Sheets 6203, 6204, 6303, 6304, 1/24,000 map received from 285th Field Artillery Observation Battalion.

0945 – Battalion Commander left CP for Idaho for Conference with Commanding General.

1030 – Location of installations for December 24th, 25th, 26th given grid location of CP and guns positions received from 422nd Field Artillery Group.

1130 – Battalion commander returned from Idaho.

0739 – 2400 – “A”, “B” and “C” combine fire 18 missions as follows:  13 H & I, 1 Base Point Registration: 1 Registration Check point No. 3; 1 TOT and 2 others, expending 191 rounds of ammunition.

2045 – Overlay of fire possibilities of new position area (Map Central Europe 1/100,00) received from S-3, 422nd Field Artillery Group.

2230 – Coordinate for survey officer giving description for points at new gun locations received from S-2, 422 FA Group.

2245 – “A” reported that strafing by enemy planes 1000 yards west of Gun Position.

1300 – Gun section No. 1 of “C” Battery left for special mission to fire H & I on town of Bitburg from position at (108347) at 1500

Wednesday – 27th December 1944:[108]

An enemy attempt to recapture the high ground north of Ringel (Luxembourg) (P74) was repulsed and Eppeldorf (Eppeldorf) (P93) and Echternach (Ringel, Luxembourg) (L03) were cleared of the enemy in XII Core zone.  Patrols were pushed to the Moselle River southeast of Echternach (Ringel, Luxembourg) (L03) in XII Corps zone by the 4th Infantry Division, while the 5th Infantry Division stopped its drive to the north temporarily along the Sauer River.  Drives of the 80th Infantry Division continued slowly against stubborn resistance, with Ettelbrack (Luxembourg) (P84) being captured.  The 6th Armored Division completed movement into corps assembly area.

Additional now camouflage in the combat area became an urgent operational necessity.  Communications Zone was requested to supply 1,200 gallons of white paint and an equal amount of thinner for spraying clothes and equipment.  A second request was sent for 50,000 yards of white muslin and 50,000 snow suits.  Communications Zone reported that no white cloth was available, but suggested that 5,000 mattress covers from which 10,000 suits could be made were available at Reins (T37) in the Advance Section Communication Zone depot.  Arrangements were made to deliver the mattress covers to an Army depot at Metz (U85)

Wednesday – 27th December 1944:[109]

The Battalion moved to Consdorf (TIL 9940-3206) was relieve of attachment to 422nd  Field Artillery Group an attached to XII Corps Artillery in general support of Corps front.  Battalion remained in this location and assignment at end of period.

Thursday – 28th December 1944:[110]

The Army Commander issued the following orders to the Corps Commanders:  They stated in part:

”1.  a. First U.S. Army o the north is containing the enemy on its front.

b. Seventh U.S. Army on the south will continue to defend present sector.

“2.  Third U.S. Army will:

a. Seize Houffalize (Belgium) (P67) and continue the attack northeast in the direction of St. Vith (Belgium) (P88).

b. Cross the Sauer River in the vicinity of Echternach (Luxemburg) (L03) and drive up the Prum Valley in the direction of Bonn (F53).

“3.  III Corps (26th and 35th Infantry Division, 6th Armored Division and attached troops) will:

a. Assume command of 6th Armored Division and attached troops.

b. Pass 4th Armored Division and attached troops to XII Corps.

c. Pass 318th Infantry ( – ) and attached troops to XII Corps.

d. Pass Combat Command “A” (9th Armored Division) to VIII Corps.

e. Attack northeast on Army order in the direction of St. Vith (Belgium) (P88 and , in conjunction with XII Corps, seize crossings of the Rhine River in the vicinity of Bonn (Germany) (F53).

“4.  VIII corps (28th and 87th Infantry Division, 101st Airborne Division, 9th and 11th Armored Divisions and attached troops) will:

a. Continue present mission.  (Responsibility for Meuse River Defense Sector).

b. Seize the high ground in the vicinity of Houffalize (Belgium) (P67) in order to control the Houffaliz (Belgium) road net.

c. Protect left (northwest) flank of Third U.S. Army and attack northeast on Army order echelon to left rear of III Corps.

“5.   XII Corps (4th, 5th, and 80th Infantry Division, 4th Armored Division and attached troops) will:

a. Maintain contact with III Corps on left (west), continue to exert pressure along present front of 80th Infantry Division and on Army order cross Saueer River in vicinity of Echternach (Luxembourg) (L03).

b. On Army order drive up the Prum Valley in the direction of Bonn (F53).

“6.   XX Corps (90th and 95th infantry Division, 10th Armored Division and attached troops) will:

a. With minimum force continue to hold present sector including Saarlautern (Germany) (Q28) bridgehead.

b. On Army order advance north and clear enemy form the area between Moselle and Saar Rivers.

c. Be prepared to follow XII Corps to the northeast.

“7.  Timing.

a. VIII Corps will seize high ground in the Vicinity of Houffalize (Belgium) (Q67) early 30 December;  prepared to continue attack northeast echeloned to the left rear of III Corps.

b. III Corps will attack on Army order in the direction of St. Vith (Belgium) (P88).

c. XII Corps will cross Sauer River in the vicinity of Echternach (Luxembourg) (L03) and on Army order attack north in the Prum Valley to seize crossings of the Rhine River in the vicinity of Bonn (Germany) (F53).

d. XX Corps will clear area between Moselle and Saar Rivers south of Trier (Germany) on Army order.

”8.  a. The following air support will be provided for this operation:

(1) Heavy bombers by Eight U.S. Air Force.

(2) Medium bombers by Ninth U.S. Bomber Division.

(3) Seven fighter-bomber groups’ one tactical reconnaissance group and one night fighter squadron by XIX Tactical Air Command.

b. Air support missions will be requested through Commanding General, XIX Tactical Air Command.”

While the 4th Infantry Division continued to maintain its positions along the Moselle River in XII Corps zone, the 22nd Infantry extended its zone and relived the 10th Infantry (5th Infantry Division) and the 12th Infantry relieved the 2nd Infantry (5th Infantry Division) northwest of Echternach (Luxembourg) (L93).  Prior to relief of the 2nd and 10th Infantry Regiments, the 5th Infantry Division advanced to the Sauer River.  Limited advances to the Sure and Sauer Rivers were made by the 80th Infantry Division.  Meanwhile, the 6th Armored Division began to move its units from corps assembly area to the front lines.

Emphasizing security, a check was made of the Forward Echelon of Army Headquarters and of all supply points.  Additional counter-intelligence corps personnel was requested for III Corps.  An investigation was made of the possibility of enemy agents using pigeons as return means of communication.

Thursday – 28th December 1944:[111]

The Battalion was relieve of attachment to 422nd Field Artillery Group and attached directly to XII Corps Artillery and move to position aria in vicinity of Consdorf (UIL 994321) with mission of general support of XII Corps.

Thursday – 28th December 1944:[112]

0005 – Battalion relieved from attachment to 422nd Field Artillery Group and attached to 177th Field Artillery Group, VOGA, XII Corps Artillery.

0640 – Overlay showing fire capabilities of 8.8cm Pak 43 Howitzer at Battery “A, 244th FA Battalion position received.”

0700 – Battalion Commander and B.6’s with parties left for reconnaissance of new positions in the vicinity of Consdorf.

0900 – Artillery Situation Report from S-2 forward to 177th Field Artillery Group.

1130 – Battalion commander and party returned to Biwer and gave orders to close station and move to new position.

1230 – Battalion commander and party with HQ Battery moved to new position at Consdorf.  Distance marched six miles.  Cold and Clear.  Morale;  Excellent.

1700 – Closed CP at Biwer (01862393).

1600 – Forward CP opened at Consdorf (99403206)

2100 – Firing Batteries went into position at new location at Consdorf ready to fire at following points: “A” – (9930831294); “B” – (9980131286); “C” – (0031830408).

2050 – Communication established with “A” & “C” gun positions.

2100 – Communication established with XII Corps Artillery.

1001 – 0600 – Fired H & I mission on towns of Welschbillig; Helenenburg (Helenenberg, Welschbillig, Germany), Gilzem at rate of 1 round per hour and at Trier at a rate of 7 rounds per hour.

Thursday – 28th December 1944:[113]

The Battalion departed Biwer Luxembourg.

Thursday – 28th December 1944:[114]

The Battalion arrived Consdorf, Luxembourg.  Still closer to the offensive front the batteries did a great deal of firing for which they received an ample quantity of counter-battery fire.  It was here that the Battalion manned the forward gun ahead of the Infantry mortars to enable it to fire on the hub city of Bitburg. (Long gun episode).

Friday – 29th December 1944:[115]

There was little activity in XII corps area with the enemy engaged in patrolling and laid harassing artillery and mortar fires.  The 4th, 5th, and 80th Infantry Division maintaining their position along the Sauer and Sure Rivers, while the 5th Infantry Division prepared to attack to the northeast and relieved the 6th Armored Division which had closed into an area between Neufchateau (Neufchâteau, Belgium) (P34) and Aplon (Belgium) (P62).

Friday – 29th December 1944:[116]

0855 – Fire possibilities Chart overlay forwarded from S-3 to S-3 Corps Artillery.

1200 – Line rout map overlay, giving wire rout location of wire installations to Corps Artillery Commo.

1300 – Battalion commander left CP for inspection of Gun positions.

1500 – Battalion commander returned to CP after inspection of Gun positions.

0001 – 2400:  Battalion Fired H & I missions on towns of Trier, Möhn, Helenenburgs (Helenenberg, Welschbillig, Germany), Meckel and Eisenbeck at rate of 14 rounds per hour.

Friday – 29th December 1944:[117]

The single gun at (108347) (No. 1 of “C” Battery) drew such heavy counter battery fire that it was displace to an alternate position at (011357) on 30 December and resume fire on Bitburg (Germany) after registering by sound adjustment. (Long gun episode).

Sunday – 30th December 1944:[118]

An attempt to take the high ground in the vicinity of Ringel (Luxembourg) (P74) was unsuccessful and elsewhere in XII Corps zone the enemy remained on the defensive.  The 10th Infantry (5th Division) advanced slowly and captured Riesdorf (Germany) (P94), seven miles northwest of Echternach (Luxembourg) (L03), in XII Corps zone.

Saturday – 30th December 1944:[119]

0900 – Situation overlay as of 293000 received from Corps Artillery G-2 for S-2 this Battalion.

1315 – Situation overlay of enemy situation as of 292000 forwarded to S-2, 945th FA Battalion.

2130 – Due to enemy fire on single gun position manned by “C” Battery on special mission firing on Bitburg gun was removed and returned to Battery.  Single gun from “A” Battery went into position at 0112635733 resuming H & I fire on Bitburg.

0001 – 2400 – Fired H & I on 18 different targets at rate of 21 rounds per hour.

Sunday – 31st December 1944:[120]

The enemy continued a defensive attitude in the XII Corps zone except for a small-scale attack south of Machtum (Luxembourg) (L01) which was broken up.  The 4th, 5th and 80th Infantry Division maintained their position.  Activities in the XII corps area were limited to patrolling along the Mogelle, Suer and Sauer River.  Approximately thirty-five battalions of field artillery participated in the operation to relieve and establish a solid contact with the Bastogne (Belgium) (P55) forces.  Beginning with 22nd December, these battalions expended 94,230 rounds of ammunition.

Sunday – 31st December 1944:[121]

1245 – Battery “B” received counter battery fire from 1245 – 1400: one shell landing so close to No. 4 piece so as to put the gun out of action until repaired by Ordnance

0001 – 2400 – Battalion continued its schedule of H & I fires on 18 targets – the same as yesterday.

December 1944:[122]

In the month of December the Battalion fired a total of 6,360 rounds of capture German ammunition on the Metz Forts.  This makes a grand total of 10,706 rounds of foreign ammunition fired by this battalion to date.

While at Metz, the Battalion found a supply of German Flash Reducer for the 10.5cm Light Field Howitzer an experimented with it.  At a range of 8,300 yards, using Charge V, one sack of (40 Grams) of the flash reducer per powder charge, place between the charge and the projectile, showed no effect on range but reduce the flash about 95%.  Two sacks (80 Grams) used with Charge V flash reducer seemed to cause a considerable cloud of blue-white smoke which was caught by the muzzle brake an nearly obscured the gun grew.  Samples of the flash reducer were sent to the Artillery Officer, Third U.S. Army, and to the Commanding General, XX Corps Artillery.

Through the improvisation of GFT’s from such firing tables as were available, the Battalion masse it’s fire of 76.2cm Field Cannon; 8.8 Pak 43 Guns and 10.5cm Light Field Howitzers with other Battalions of the 5th Infantry Division Artillery on TOT millions.  Sufficient information was not available in the firing tables for the application of meteorological corrections.  However, by frequent check registrations it was possible to deliver very accurate fire transfers from the various weapons.  Surveillance of these fires by Air OP’s showed excellent results.

December 1944:[123]

During the month of December the Battalion fired a total of 3,885 rounds of 155mm gun ammunition on counter battery, harassing and interdiction and registration fires.

Although considerable counter battery fire was received, there were no personnel or material losses.

The period ended in a cacophony of noise.  A TOT with the Corps Artillery was fire at 312400.  At 312355 the Germans shelled and bombe the position area for about five minutes – there were no casualties.


[1] Third U. S. Army After Action Report, Volume I, Operations, Chapter 7 – December Operations, Page 153, 154

[2] Third U.S. Army After Action Report, Volume II, Staff Section Report, Part 3, G-2 Section – December, Page 27

[3] 244th Field Artillery Battalion Journal

[4] U. S. Army Heritage and Education Center, U.S. Army Military History Institute 202-244th 1945, “History of The 244th Field Artillery Battalion During  World War II, Page 3

[5] 244th Field Artillery Battalion After Action Report, 1 December to 31 December

[6] 244th Field Artillery Battalion After Action Report, 1 December to 31 December

[7] 244th Field Artillery Battalion Journal

[8] 244th Field Artillery Battalion After Action Report, 1 December to 31 December

[9] Third U. S. Army After Action Report, Volume I, Operations, Chapter 7 – December Operations, Page 154

[10] 244th Field Artillery Battalion After Action Report, 1 December to 31 December

[11] 244th Field Artillery Battalion After Action Report, 1 December to 31 December

[12] 244th Field Artillery Battalion Journal

[13] Third U. S. Army After Action Report, Volume I, Operations, Chapter 7 – December Operations, Page 155

[14] 244th Field Artillery Battalion After Action Report, 1 December to 31 December

[15] 244th Field Artillery Battalion Journal

[16] Third U. S. Army After Action Report, Volume I, Operations, Chapter 7 – December Operations, Page 157

[17] 55th Armored Engineer Battalion, 10th Armored Division, After Action Report, November & December 1944, Page 5

[18] Third U.S. Army After Action Report, Annex No. 2, Third U.S. Army Directives, Page XIX

[19] 244th Field Artillery Battalion Journal

[20] Third U. S. Army After Action Report, Volume I, Operations, Chapter 7 – December Operations, Page 157

[21] Field Artillery Support For III Corps Attack 18 – 26 December 1944, Gregory V. Morton paper, Maneuver Center of Excellence Libraries, Donovan Research Library, Fort Benning, Georgia (III Corps, After Action Report, 31 December 44, Page1)

[22] 244th Field Artillery Battalion Journal

[23] Third U. S. Army After Action Report, Volume I, Operations, Chapter 7 – December Operations, Page 158

[24] 244th Field Artillery Battalion After Action Report, 1 December to 31 December

[25] 244th Field Artillery Battalion Journal

[26] 244th Field Artillery Battalion After Action Report, 1 December to 31 December

[27] Third U. S. Army After Action Report, Volume I, Operations, Chapter 7 – December Operations, Page 159

[28] 244th Field Artillery Battalion After Action Report, 1 December to 31 December

[29] 244th Field Artillery Battalion Journal

[30] War Department, The Adjutant General’s Office, Headquarters III Corps After Action Report, December 1944, Page 7

[31] Third U. S. Army After Action Report, Volume I, Operations, Chapter 7 – December Operations, Page 160

[32] 244th Field Artillery Battalion Journal

[33] Third U. S. Army After Action Report, Volume I, Operations, Chapter 7 – December Operations, Page 160, 161

[34] Third U. S. Army After Action Report, Volume I, Operations, Chapter 7 – December Operations, Page 162

[35] 244th Field Artillery Battalion After Action Report, 1 December to 31 December

[36] 244th Field Artillery Battalion Journal

[37] 244th Field Artillery Battalion Journal

[38] Third U. S. Army After Action Report, Volume I, Operations, Chapter 7 – December Operations, Page 162, 163

[39] 244th Field Artillery Battalion after Action Report, 1 December to 31 December

[40] 244th Field Artillery Battalion after Action Report, 1 December to 31 December

[41] 244th Field Artillery Battalion Journal

[42] Third U. S. Army After Action Report, Volume I, Operations, Chapter 7, December Operations, Page 163

[43] 244th Field Artillery Battalion Journal

[44] Third U. S. Army After Action Report, Volume I, Operations,  Chapter 7, December Operations, Page 164

[45] III Corps Headquarters After Action Report, War Department The Adjutant General’s Office – Page 3 (9)

[46] 244th Field Artillery Battalion Journal

[47] Third U. S. Army After Action Report, Volume I, Operations, Chapter 7 – December Operations, Page 165

[48] 244th Field Artillery Battalion after Action Report, 1 December to 31 December

[49] 244th Field Artillery Battalion Journal

[50] U. S. Army Heritage and Education Center, U.S. Army Military History Institute 202-244th 1945, “History of The 244th Field Artillery Battalion During  World War II, Page 4

[51] 244th Field Artillery Battalion after Action Report, 1 December to 31 December

[52] 244th Field Artillery Battalion after Action Report, 1 December to 31 December

[53] Third U. S. Army After Action Report, Volume I, Operations , Chapter 7 – December Operations, Page 165, 166

[54] III Corps Headquarters After Action Report, War Department The Adjutant General’s Office – Page 4 (10)

[55] Third U. S. Army After Action Report, Volume II, Command – Part 1, Page 6

[56] 244th Field Artillery Battalion Journal

[57] 244th Field Artillery Battalion after Action Report, 1 December to 31 December

[58] 244th Field Artillery Battalion after Action Report, 1 December to 31 December

[59] Third U. S. Army After Action Report, Volume I, Operations, Chapter 7 – December Operations, Page 166

[60] III Corps Headquarters After Action Report, War Department The Adjutant General’s Office – Page 4 (10)

[61] Third U.S. Army, Notes on Bastogne Operation, G.S. Patton, jr. Page 2

[62] 244th Field Artillery Battalion Journal

[63] Third U. S. Army After Action Report, Volume I, Operations, Chapter 7 – December Operations, Page 167

[64] III Corps Headquarters After Action Report, War Department The Adjutant General’s Office – Page 6 (12)

[65] 244th Field Artillery Battalion Journal

[66] U. S. Army Heritage and Education Center, U.S. Army Military History Institute 202-244th 1945, “History of The 244th Field Artillery Battalion During  World War II, Page 4

[67] 244th Field Artillery Battalion after Action Report, 1 December to 31 December

[68] 244th Field Artillery Battalion after Action Report, 1 December to 31 December

[69] W. U. (Doc) Savage Letter, December 15, 1949

[70] U. S. Army Heritage and Education Center, U.S. Army Military History Institute 202-244th 1945, “History of The 244th Field Artillery Battalion During  World War II, Page 4

[71] Third U. S. Army After Action Report, Volume I, Operations, Chapter 7 – December Operations, Page 168, 169

[72] III Corps Headquarters After Action Report, War Department The Adjutant General’s Office – Page 6 (12)

[73] Third U.S. Army, Notes on Bastogne Operation, G.S. Patton, Jr. Page 2

[74] 244th Field Artillery Battalion Journal

[75] Third U. S. Army After Action Report, Volume I, Operations, Chapter 7 – December Operations, Page 171

[76] III Corps Headquarters After Action Report, War Department The Adjutant General’s Office – Page 8 (14)

[77] Third U.S. Army, Notes on Bastogne Operation, G.S. Patton, Jr. Page 4

[78] War Department, The Adjutant General’s Office, Headquarters III Corps After Action Report, December 1944, Page 12

[79] U. S. Army Heritage and Education Center, U.S. Army Military History Institute 202-244th 1945, “History of The 244th Field Artillery Battalion During  World War II, Page 4

[80] U. S. Army Heritage and Education Center, U.S. Army Military History Institute 202-244th 1945, “History of The 244th Field Artillery Battalion During  World War II, Page 4

[81] 244th Field Artillery Battalion after Action Report, 1 December to 31 December

[82] 244th Field Artillery Battalion Journal

[83] Third U. S. Army After Action Report, Volume I, Operations, Chapter 7 – December Operations, Page 172

[84] Third U.S. Army, Notes on Bastogne Operation, G.S. Patton, Jr. Page 5

[85] 244th Field Artillery Battalion Journal

[86] Third U. S. Army After Action Report, Volume I, Operations, Chapter 7 – December Operations, Page 172

[87] 244th Field Artillery Battalion After Action Report, 1 December to 31 December

[88] 244th Field Artillery Battalion after Action Report, 1 December to 31 December

[89] Third U. S. Army After Action Report, Volume I, Operations, Chapter 7 – December Operations, Page 174, 176

[90] Third U.S. Army, Notes on Bastogne Operation, G.S. Patton, Jr. Page 6

[91] U. S. Army Heritage and Education Center, U.S. Army Military History Institute 202-244th 1945, “History of The 244th Field Artillery Battalion During  World War II, Page 4

[92] 244th Field Artillery Battalion Journal

[93] 244th Field Artillery Battalion after Action Report, 1 December to 31 December

[94] 244th Field Artillery Battalion after Action Report, 1 December to 31 December

[95] Third U. S. Army After Action Report, Volume I, Operations, Chapter 7 – December Operations, Page 177, 178, 179

[96] Third U.S. Army, Notes on Bastogne Operation, G.S. Patton, Jr. Page 6

[97] 244th Field Artillery Battalion Journal

[98] U. S. Army Heritage and Education Center, U.S. Army Military History Institute 202-244th 1945, “History of The 244th Field Artillery Battalion During  World War II, Page 4

[99] Third U. S. Army After Action Report, Volume I, Operations, Chapter 7 – December Operations, Page 179, 180

[100] Third U.S. Army, Notes on Bastogne Operation, G.S. Patton, Jr. Page 6

[101] U. S. Army Heritage and Education Center, U.S. Army Military History Institute 202-244th 1945, “History of The 244th Field Artillery Battalion During  World War II, Page 4

[102] 244th Field Artillery Battalion after Action Report, 1 December to 31 December

[103] Third U. S. Army After Action Report, Volume I, Operations, Chapter 7 – December Operations, Page 180, 181

[104] 244th Field Artillery Battalion Journal

[105] Third U. S. Army After Action Report, Volume I, Operations, Chapter 7 – December Operations, Page 181, 182

[106] Third U.S. Army, Notes on Bastogne Operation, G.S. Patton, Jr. Page 6

[107] 244th Field Artillery Battalion Journal

[108] Third U. S. Army After Action Report, Volume I, Operations, Chapter 7 – December Operations, Page 182, 183

[109] 244th Field Artillery Battalion after Action Report, 1 December to 31 December

[110] Third U. S. Army After Action Report, Volume I, Operations, Chapter 7 – December Operations, Page 184, 185

[111] 244th Field Artillery Battalion after Action Report, 1 December to 31 December

[112] 244th Field Artillery Battalion Journal

[113] W. U. (Doc) Savage Letter, December 15, 1949

[114] U. S. Army Heritage and Education Center, U.S. Army Military History Institute 202-244th 1945, “History of The 244th Field Artillery Battalion During  World War II, Page 4

[115] Third U. S. Army After Action Report, Volume I, Operations, Chapter 7 – December Operations, Page 185, 186

[116] 244th Field Artillery Battalion Journal

[117] 244th Field Artillery Battalion after Action Report, 1 December to 31 December

[118] Third U. S. Army After Action Report, Volume I, Operations, Chapter 7 – December Operations, Page 186

[119] 244th Field Artillery Battalion Journal

[120] Third U. S. Army After Action Report, Volume I, Operations, Chapter 7 – December Operations, Page 187, 188

[121] 244th Field Artillery Battalion Journal

[122] 244th Field Artillery Battalion after Action Report, 1 December to 31 December

[123] 244th Field Artillery Battalion after Action Report, 1 December to 31 December

1 Comment

  1. Ron Purpura
    April 5, 2014

    Wonderful Site !!!! I was wondering how I may be able to see the Third U. S. Army After Action Report you have listed. My Grandfather fought in the 95th 378th Infantry Company F (he was one of the Iron Men of Metz) and I am trying to learn all about his Company/Regiment. Any help would be appreciated
    Thanks in advance
    Ron

    Reply

Leave a Reply