XII Corps Spearhead of Patton’s Third Army, Lt. Co. George Dyer, Part 1, Chapter 1, Page 51, Map No.13

Saturday – 1st July 19441

          “then back on the train and through the Port; the ferry trip across the Harbor and finally boarded the S.S. Mormacmoon”.

          Exchester standard C3 type hull design.  Built by Ingalls Ship Building Corp., Pascagoula, Miss.  Built for American Export Lines, 1940 and named  Moore McCormack, then renamed Mormacmoon.  In 1958 she was returned to US Government (Marad) and laid up, 1961 Wabash, 1965 Evanthie, and in 1969 she was scrapped at Hong Kong.

Hull
Number
Yard
Number
Contract
Number
DesignNameShipyard Cost
Plus Fee
Commission
Procurement
FacilitiesAdministrationTotal
MC-63253MCc-253C3Exchester$2,677,031$13,798$95,542$27,610$2,813,981
Technical Specifications Maritime Commission Design C3 Specifications for MC-38 to 43 (Federal SB & DD CO.)
Technical Specifications.
  
DimensionsEnglish UnitsMetric Units
Length – Overall492’0″149.96 m
Length – Between Perpendiculars465’0″141.73 m
Beam – Maximum96’6″21.18 m
Draft Load Molded28’6″8.68 m
Depth Weather Deck42’6″12.95 m
Mast Height – Above Daselinen/an/a
Draft – Maximum28’6″8.68 m
MachineryTurbine
Designed Sea Speed16.5 Knots
SHP – Normal8,500 SHP8,500 SHP
Fuel Miles12,70012,700
Deadweight Tnes12,527 LT
Displacement Load Tons17,615 LT
Passenger & Spares12 & 4
Crew43 & 9
Factor of Subdivision1
Bulkhead Deck2nd
Bale Capacity730,549 Cu ft20,685.71 Cu m
Grain Capacity818,019 Cu ft23,162.45 CU m
Reefer Capacity0 Cu ft0 Cu m
Liquid Cargo Tons1,848 LT
Fuel1,752 LT
Number of Holds5

          SS Mormacmoon, photo from ship maker, taken at completion, prior to U. S. Navy armament.  Courtesy Tec/4 James W. Wingate

SS MORMACMOON2

                                             Length, overall ~~~~~ 492′ 0″
                                             Beam ~~~~~~~~~~~~ 69′ 6″
                                             Draft ~~~~~~~~~~~~ 28′ 6″
                                             Gross tons ~~~~~~~ 7,939
                                             Speed (knots) ~~~~~~ 17
                                             Radius (miles) ~~~~~ 3,000
                                             Propulsion ~~~~~~~~ Turbine
                                             Passengers ~~~~~~~ 549
                                             Cargo (cu. ft.) ~~~~~ 548,350

Built in 1940 by Ingalls Shipbuilding Corporation, Pascagoula, Miss.
Former name: EXCHESTER

Operated during World War II by Moore-McCormack Lines.

          The Mormacmoon  was used for nearly three years strictly as a freighter before being fitted in November 1943 to carry a limited number of troops.  Typical voyages as a cargo ship were as follows: She sailed from New York in August 1942 for Durban~ Aden~ Port Sudan, Suez~ Kilindini and Cape Town.  She returned, via Punta Arenas (Chile) and the Panama Canal, to New York on 6 March 1943 and a few weeks later made a trip to the Mersey and Avonmouth.  Following return to Philadelphia from England she voyaged to Shatt-al-Arab and Bandar Shahpur.

     Between October and early December 1943 the Mormacmoon was altered for 549 troops, by the East Coast Shipbuilding Co. at New York.  She made a round trip to Barry (Wales) and Belfast~ then departed on the following seven voyages from New York during 1944:

(1) on 1 February to Barry

(2) on 28 March to Avonmouth

(3) 011 14 May to Glasgow

(4) on 2 July to Barry ~ Cardiff  and Bristol

(5) on 19 August to the Mersey, Bristol and Cardiff

(6) on 6 October to Gibraltar, Marseilles and Oran

(7) on 25 November to Marseilles.

     The Mormacmoon returned to New York on Christmas Eve 1944~ and during 1945 departed on voyages as follows, all from New York except one as noted

(1) on 18 January to The Solent~ Le Havre and Mumbles

(2) on 15 March to Le Havre and Newport

(3) on 10 May to Antwerp, Downs and Le Havre

(4) from Philadelphia on 6 June to Antwerp and Downs

(5) on 19 August to Marseilles~ Leghorn~ Oran and Beni Saf (Algeria)

(6) on 9 October to Genoa, Naples, Oran, Beni Saf and Marseilles;

(7) on 29 November to Istanbul (Turkey) and Constanta (Romania), with return to New York on
     23 January 1946.

     The ship next went to Baltimore where she underwent repairs which were completed in
     May.  The vessel then sailed via Philadelphia, for Scandinavian ports in normal cargo
     service.

          Mormacstar, sister ship of Mormacmoon with U. S. Navy armament

          SS Mormacmoon Vessel Status Card3
          SS Mormacmoon Fleet Status Card4

Saturday – 1st July 19445

          Departed Camp Shanks, New York the Battalion P.O.E

Saturday – 1st July 19446

          Left Shanks, Boarded train, ferry, ship

Saturday – 1st July 1944 “HQ” Morning Report7

                             Aboard USAT “NY 861”
                    Davis (DS)                             018 530        Lt. Col
                    Humphrey (DS)                    0 254 639        Capt.
                    Mauger                             01 169 634        1st Lt.
                               Above three Officers DS NYPE
                               New York, N.Y. to dy
          Departed Camp Shanks, N.Y. via
          Rail 1945. Arr NYPE and embarked
          aboard the USAT “NY 861” at 1845
                    Strength Officers:  1 Lt. Col
                                              1 Major
                                              3 Capt.
                                              1 1st Lt.

Saturday – 1st July 1944 “Hq” Battery Morning Report8

                              Aboard USAT “NY 861”
                    Robinson (DS)                      33 195 974     Tec/4
                    Hoyle (DS)                           36 730 995     Tec/5
                               Above two men from DS, NYPE, New
                               York, N. Y. to dy
                    Mulkey (conf)                         6 551 567     Pvt.
                              Bn Guardhouse Camp Shanks,
                              N.Y. to dy 1030
          Departed Camp Shanks, N.Y. via
          Rail 1945. Arr NYPE and embarked
          aboard the USAT “N Y 861” at 1845

Saturday – 1st July 1944 Battery “C” Morning Report9

                              Aboard USAT “NY 861”
                    Leota (Hosp)                       32 875 866     Pvt.
                              Sk in Sta Hosp, Cp Shanks, N.Y. to dy
          Departed Camp Shanks, N.Y. via rail 1645.
          Arr. NYPE and embarked aboard the USAT
          “NY-861” at 1845.
                    EM Present For Duty 124
                    Officers 4

Sunday – 2nd July 194410

          Sailed from N. Y. Harbor

Sunday – 2nd July 194411

          It was a big convoy with many troop ships going over, surrounded by Navy ships to take the convoy across the ocean and some submarines to watch out for German submarines.  We had a few warning shots, and of course, we were in black-out all the way over.  But other than a few warnings of submarines in the vicinity there was nothing untoward, and we did have a good trip across.  We had lots of entertainment from the enlisted men, mostly in the battalion and some of the crew of the Mormacmoon.

Note: “Coffin Corner” or “Hells Corner” refers to the last ship in the first line to starboard of the lead and is the usual position for ships loaded with ammunition and or explosives.

Sunday – 2nd July 194412

          We set sail on the 2nd of July 1944 to cross the Atlantic in convoy.  Our boat which occupied “Coffin Corner” held only our Battalion.  We all assembled to listen to the Irish tenor of the ship’s crew at the nightly concert and “Old Tim He Came Too”.  Bingo and cards were interrupted occasionally for chow.  Our destroyer escorts flew the black flag indicating “submarine” on several occasions, but no torpedoes were fired.

Sunday – 2nd July 194413
          Byron G. Rogers

          After training for two years we were ready to go overseas.  We sailed on July 2, 1944, on board the S.S. Mormacmoon.  Just our battalion was on this ship. There were destroyer escorts flying black flags indicating “enemy submarines” on several occasions, but no torpedoes were fired.  On July 13, 1944, we passed thru the Irish Sea, and debarked at Cardiff, Wales.

Sunday – 2nd July 194414

          Left U.S.A.

Sunday – 2nd July 1944 “HQ” Morning Report15

                              Aboard USAT “NY 861”
          Departed NYPE aboard the USAT
          “NY 861” at 0420 enroute to
          European Theater of Operations
                    Strength Officers:    1 Lt. Col.
                                               1 Major
                                               3 Capt.
                                               1 1st Lt.

Sunday – 2nd July 1944 “Hq” Battery Morning Report16

                             Aboard USAT “NY 861”
          Departed NYPE aboard the USAT
          “NY 861” at 0420 enroute to
          European Theater of Operations

Sunday – 2nd July 1944 Battery “C” Morning Report17

                              Aboard USAT “NY 861”
                    Evans                              34 339 387     Pvt.
                              Dy to sk in Sta Hosp LD
          Departed NYPE aboard the USAT “NY 861”
          at 0420 enroute to European Theater of
          Operations.
                    EM Present for duty 123; EM Absent 1
                    Officers: 4

Wednesday – 5th July 1944 Battery “C” Morning Report18

                              Aboard USAT “NY 861”
                    Lindsey                            34 339 545     Cpl.
                              Dy to sk in Sta Hosp LD

Thursday – 6th July 1944 Battery “C” Morning Report19

                             Aboard USAT “NY 861”
                    Evans (Hosp)                       34 339 378     Pvt.
                              Sk in Sta Hosp LD to dy

Tuesday – 11th July 1944 “HQ & Hq” Battery Morning Report20

                             Company Restricted
                              Arbury Park Warwickshire vK7709
                    Murphy, Edmound C.                0 278 607     Capt.
                    Greer, Harry J.                     W2 113 400     WOJG
                    Boyland, Edward T.                32 874 703     Pvt.
                              Adv. Det. Consisting of above
                              Off, WO & EM departed billets
                              in Macclesfield Cheshire at
                              0930 hrs. arrived at Arbury
                              Park vicinity of Nuneaton,
                              Warwickshire at 1400 hrs.

Wednesday – 12th July 1944 “HQ” Morning Report21

                              Aboard USAT “NY 861”
                              3 – 12 July 1944
          Enroute to European Theater of
          Operation without incident
                    Strength Officers    1 Lt. Col.
                                              1 Major
                                              3 Capt
                                              1 1st Lt.
                    Pres For Dy 5, Abs’t 1

Wednesday – 12th July 1944 “Hq” Battery Morning Report22

                              Aboard USAT “NY 861”
                              3 – 12 July 1944
          Enroute to European Theater of
          Operation without incident
                    Strength Officers:  1 Capt.
                                             1 1st Lt.
                                             3 2nd Lt.
                                             1 WO
                   Strength EM: 94 Present For Dutt
                                             1 Absent

Wednesday – 12th July 1944 Battery “C” Morning Reportt23

                              Aboard USAT “NY 861”
                              3 – 12 July 1944.
          Enroute to European Theater of Operations
          without inciden

Thursday – 13th July 194424

     1930 – Debarked USAT NY 861 at Cardiff, Wales.
     2030 – Entrained for Nuneaton, Warwickshire, England.

Thursday – 13th July 1944

          The weather held and the trip over was a pleasure cruise.  On the 13th of July we sighted the Kelly-green hills of Old Erin off the starboard bow.  Later in the day we passed through the Irish Sea and sailed in among the barrage balloons and debarked at Cardiff, Wales.  We climbed into strange English trains or “Carriages” and on our way to Nuneaton, had our first view of the well-kept English countryside.

Note see:  http://ww2troopships.com/crossings/1944b.htm 

     The Battalion sighted Ireland off the starboard bow and later that day passed through the Irish Sea and into Cardiff Wales our P.O.D.  http://ww2troopships.com/crossings/1944b.htm.  The Battalion boarded a train to Neueaton.25

     We finally docked at Cardiff, Wales, and there was, of course, a lot of air protection there and barrage balloons all over the place.  We got off the ship and immediately onto the English trains – the carriages, as they called them — and get on our way up to Nuneaton. We had a good view of the English countryside on the way up, and on the 14th of July we established a base camp at Arbury Park.   We were only there a short time — just about time to go to a few of the pubs, taste the good English beer, and see the  great damage done In Coventry by the German air raids that destroyed the cathedral, and many of the installations and facilities at Coventry.  My battalion had all of its equipment with the exception of the guns — the 155 mm guns were not present.  They were not finished being manufactured in the States, so we were without them.26

Thursday – 13th July 194427
          Byron G, Rogers

          On July 13, 1944, we passed thru the Irish Sea, and debarked at Cardiff, Wales.  There we went by trains thru the English Countryside, and on July 14, 1944, we made camp at Arbury Park.  We saw lots of bomb damage because Germany had been bombing England for a long time.  We had to go to Birmingham, England to pick up supplies and I drove a 2-1/2ton truck across the London Bridge.  After 12 days we left Portland Harbor with only our M1 rifles, bayonets, & hand grenades.

Thursday – 13thJuly 194428

          Arrived Cardiff, Wales, England

Thursday – 13th July 1944 “HQ” Morning Report29

                             Entrained enroute to Arbury Park, England
          Debarked from USAT “NY 861” 1900 at
          Cardiff, Wales. Departed via rail for
          Arbury Park, England, new permanent
          station
                    Strength Officers: 1 Lt. Col.
                                             1 Major,
                                             3 Capt.
                                             1 1st Lt.
                    Pres For Dy 5, Abs’t 1

Thursday – 13th July 1944 “Hq” Battery Morning Report30

                              Entrained enroute to Arbury Park, England
          Debarked from USAT “NY 861” 1900 at
          Cardiff, Wales. Departed via rail for
          Arbury Park, England, new permanent
          station
                    Strength Officers: 1 Lt. Col.
                                             1 Major,
                                             3 Capt.
                                             1 1st Lt.
                    Strength EM: 94 Present For Duty, 1 Absent

Thursday – 13th July 1944 Battery “C” Morning Report31

                              Entrained enrout to Asbury Park, England
                    Lindsay (Hosp)                     34 339 595     Cpl.
                              Sk in Hosp USAT NY 861 LD to DS as Patient
                              81st Gen Hosp, APO 516, US Army
          Debarked from USAT “NY 861” at Cardiff,
          Wales 1900. Departed via rail for Asbury
          Park, England, new permanent station.

Friday – 14th July 194432

     0350 – Arrived Nuneaton, Warwickshire, England.
     0645 – Arrived Aubury Park and Established Base Camp.

Friday – 14th July 194433

          The Battalion established base camp at Aubury Park England.

Friday – 14th July 194434

          On the 14th of July we established a base camp at Aubury Park.  We barely had time to sample the English beer in the pubs, see the bomb damage in Coventry and learn the first verse of “Roll Me Over In The Clover” when the Battalion was assigned a special mission.

Friday – 14th July 194435

          Arrived Arbury Park England

Friday – 14th July 1944 “HQ” Morning Report36

                             Arbury Park, Warwickshire, vK7909
                    Murphy (DS)                          0 278 607     Capt.
                              DS to dy
          Detrained 0300 Nuneaton, England from
          Cardiff, Wales. Arrived present station
          via motor transport 0730

Friday – 14th July 1944 “Hq” Battery Morning Report37

                              Arbury Park, Warwickshire, vK7909
                    Boylan (DS)                        32 874 703     Pvt.
                              DS to dy
          Detrained 0300 Nuneaton, England from
          Cardiff, Wales. Arrived present station
          via motor transport 0730

Friday – 14th July 1944 Battery “C” Morning Report38

                              Arbury Park, Warwickshire vK7909
          Detrained 0300 Nuneaton, England from
          Cardiff, Wales. Arrived present Sta via
          motor transport 0730

          Major Carey Clark, Asbery Park England

Saturday – 15th July 194439

     0816 – Lt. Col. Davis and Staff Officers left for Third Army Headquarters                                           (Peover Hall, Knutsford England).

     1830 – Lt. Col. Davis and Staff Officers arrived back at Base Camp

Friday – 15th July 194440

          Battalion arrived Arbury Park, Warwickshire, England

          Tec/5 Harold D. Metheny standing in the doorway of his Nissen Hut

Sunday – 16th July 194441

          Usual Camp duties.

Monday – 17th July 194442

         1930 – C.P. relocated at new position approximately 125
                    yards south.

Monday – 17th July 194443

          Usual Camp duties.

Dearest Family,

     Up to my neck in work – have only a second to let you know I’m feeling great. Boat trip was marvelous. Camp here isn’t as bad as I’d expected.
     Am trying to see as much as I can in the time off – which isn’t much. Cable to you and Jane sent today. Will write a long newsey letter tonight or tomorrow.
     Jane is fine – says she’s heard from you several times. Glad you are all like her as much as I do.
     Her birthday is August 20. Get something for her. Perhaps you know what she’d like. Got three letters from you #8-9-10. Two from Jane. Peg’s letter came too. Non from Uncle Art. Best love to one and all.
                                                                           Your Son.

Tuesday – 18th July 194444

          Usual Camp duties.45

Tuesday – 18th July 1944 Battery “C” Morning Report46

                              Arbury Park Warwickshire vK7809
                    Yarbrough                          4 359 958     Sgt.
                    Smith                               32 556 558     Pfc.
                              Dy to SD Bn PX

Dear Peg,

     Please don’t think this is going to be the answer to your swell letters, it isn’t, it’s a request. Can you get some of my money and buy mother and dad birthday presents? As you know I’m in no position to go shopping. Get them anything they can use. Make it nice. I owe them so much – more than I can ever repay by mere gifts. All I can do, I guess, is make them proud that I’m their son. I’ll never let them down. Please look into the matter and do the best you can.
     Send me a 6” mirror (round)                           Much love
     I have to shave blind now!!                                Tom.
     Cookies to fill it up.

Dear Family,

     Will try and tell you what has gone on since I last wrote a long letter to you.
     Our trip on the boat was simply marvelous. The days were cool and the sun was blazing hot.   sat around and read or just looked at the sea – etc. while sunbathing. The boat was very nice with plenty of room for us all. Doc, Jr, Frank, Bob, Max, Pete and I lived together in a below decks stateroom. It wasn’t hot down there nice – we all slept real well. The tough thing was the keeping clean, no matter what you touched you got dirty and trying to shower in salt water was terrible. It wouldn’t lather soap at all. We finally took sponge baths then rinsed off with towel and finally hit the salt showers. The food was perfect! We all ate up in the officers’ mess room in three shifts, the ship’s officers & 3 navy men then us then about 20 casual officers. We only ate two meals a day, but they were huge; no one got very hungry during the day but if one did the PX had candy & cookies. I bought and ate a carton (9 boxes) of Fig Newton’s a carton of Almond Hershey’s (24 bars) and smoked a carton of Camels.

     Very few of us suffered except we never want to see the cookies or candy again. At night the
Special Service Officer (Coyne) would have entertainment for the Battalion. It was lots of fun – it wound up by having the 5 Batteries put on a show each night. Of course, “B’s” was the best!!

     When we sighted land – I was in bed – (not seasick – never had a murmur) asleep. Played
blackjack till 0400 – it was a marvelous sight – Columbus and I sure had a thrill. The next day thru our glasses we could see land on each side. Coyne & McLaughlin sure got a kick out of it. When we landed it was a nice day – it had tried to rain but just couldn’t. We spent a few hours setting watching the railroads – boy are they ever unusual. The goods wagons (freight cars) are about 12” x 8” with two pare of steel spoke wheels. The freight is just covered by a tarp. Their switching is clever; they don’t use an engine at all. It’s simply a system of pulleys and rope and a power winch. They hook the rope on the last car, turn on the juice and pull em up when the last car gets to the winch it drops off. The cars are coupled by a 3’ link chain; the cars have no breaks. The cars stop of their own accord or the engineer stops, and the cars just bump into each other. We all about died laughing while we watched. The passenger trains are like the ones seen in movies – six of us sat up and talked most of the night.

     The camp isn’t so bad. Lots of shade trees, bushes and grass – our beds are a steel lattice with no springs – we sleep on a straw tick. The stove for the huts is about 3’ x 18” stoked with coal. The latrines are cold water faucets with a trough underneath; the water drains onto a tile spillway – it’s all very crude. The food is about as good as we can expect. Powdered eggs & milk, etc. We all eat out of our mess kits. All the stuff we left behind is coming in brand spanking new. Driving around here is done on the left of course but what a thrill when your driver forgets he’s in England and drives on the right. All the traffic stops, and people smile and sadly shake their heads. Their cars are tiny similar to the ones used in the Flicks (movies). The big thrill is trying to drive a car when 9/10 of the traffic is bicycles. Single seaters, tandem, and tandem with sidecar and tin rumble seat for youngest child. Boy they don’t regard life or limb. They just go like Hell. They won’t budge either. A 2½ ton truck doesn’t phase’em. Someone said the bike deaths in all England were greater than the Blitz deaths in London in ’40.

     The people are very nice to us. They have had a hard time of it. 5 years of war on your doorstep shows. You can see the ruins wherever you go. I have cause I’ve been to several large cities. It really makes you think how foolish the people at home are when they act as if there wasn’t a war on. Their cloths are clean but have a dignified shabbiness to them. Stockings are unheard of for women. Also, a rumor they don’t wear pants!! Kind of chilly don’t you think? Someone ought to look into that matter!

     Look in any picture book of England and you’ll see that the buses are the same as the ones I’m seeing. Say!! If I tell you everything in this letter what else can I write about next time? (continued in a day or so)

     Now about you – hoe you are all fine and that the heat isn’t getting you down. Jane said it was 94 degrees in their front room for almost a week. Hot, eh? I’ll bet the kids are cute would love to see them how about a picture of all of you including Heine? Just a snapshot will do.

     Did you get my cable? I sent it yesterday. Jane said for you to writ – not to call her – when you get it. Anyway I sent her one at the same time. They cast 2’ 6 or half-crown (50 cents to you). Boy their money is great – I’ll tell you about it later on.

     Jane’s birthday is the 20th can you get her something and mail it to her? You know about what she’d like.

     I’m in increasing my Class F allotment to $165.00 per month. That leaves me with £2,8’6 about $9.00 per. I’m drawing $94.00 the 31st and have $20.00 now – that should last me a long time cause one can’t by a thing here. The things here are all rationed and you need a stamp.

     I could ramble on for another hour – I’ve a lot to tell ‘cause I’ve been big eyed trying to see it all. In my Shelby patches I’m in one of the two, it ought to be fun here ‘cause I like to eat them so much.

     Don’t forget the present for Jane also if you write her again – give her my love. She loves to hear from you.
                                                   My love to all
                                                              Yours
                                                                 Tom.
Your last was #10.
     My deepest sympathy to Mrs. Oliver and family.
     You can use the RR Express ticket to check on my Bks. bag I spoke of when I left the states. It should be there at least by the 20th.

Wednesday – 19th July 194447

          Usual Camp duties.

Wednesday – 19th July 1944 “HQ” Morning Report48

                              Arbury Park, Warwickshire vK7909
                    Humprey                            0 254 639     Capt.                              Code 9
                              Reld of princ dy BN S-3 21625 and
                              Reasgd princ dy Ass’t Bn S-3 21626
                              as of 15 July 1944
                    Murphy                               0 278 607     Capt.                              Code 9
                              Reld of princ dy Ass’t Bn S-3 21626
                              and reasgd princ dy Bn S-3 21825
                              as of 15 July 1944
                    Strength Officers: 1 Lt. Col.
                                             1 Major,
                                             3 Capt.
                                             1 1st Lt.

Thursday – 20th July 194449

          Usual Camp duties.

Thursday 20th July 1944 “HQ” Morning Report50

                              Arbury Park, 1¼ mi SW, vK7909.
                              Sta designation as shown in M/R dated
                              14 – 19 July 44 as reads “Arbury Park. 
                              Sta designation as shown in M/R dated
                              14 – 19 Jul 44 as reads “Arbury Prk,
                              Warwickshire“, vK7909” changed to read
                              “Arbury Park, 2¼ mi SW, vK7909 Nuneaton
                    Strength Officers: 1 Lt. Col.
                                             1 Major,
                                             3 Capt.
                                             1 1st Lt.

Thursday – 20th July 1944 “Hq” Battery Morning Report51

                             Arbury Park, 1¼ mi SW, vK7909
                              Warwickshire, vK7909” changed to read
                              “Arbury Park, 2¼ mi SW, vK7909 Nuneaton
                    Strength Officers: 1 Lt. Col.
                                             1 Major
                                             3 Capt.
                                             1 1st Lt.

Thursday – 20th July 1944 Battery “C” Morning Report52

                              Arbury Park, 2¼ mi. SW, vK7909, Nuneaton
                              Station designation as shown in M/R dated
                              14 – 19 July 44 as reads “Arbury Park,
                              Warwickshire, vK7909” changed to read
                              “Arbury Park, 2½ mi SW vK7909, Nuneaton.

Thursday – 20th July 1944 “MD” Detachment Morning Report53

                              Arbury Park, 2¼ mi SW, vK7909 Nuneaton
                              Sta designation as shown M/R dated
                              14-19 July 44 as reads “Arbury Park,
                              Warwickshire, vK7909” changed to read
                              “Arbury Park, 2¼ mi SW,  vK7909
                              Nuneaton

Dear Family,

     Here we go again! All of us are in perfect health and all send their best regards. Have entered my town of England and it still is the most beautiful spot I’ve seen. It’s so neat and compact. All the fields look like golf courses – the houses are like those in David Copperfield you would love it. An architect could sure get a lot of ideas here.

     John & I went to a nearby town last night. Spent the evening drinking beer in a Bn. N.A.A.F. I. (PX) with three A.T.S. gals. We had a picnic – they are so funny to listen too. Two of them were Scotch lassies, one by 1. It was fun. Did you get Jane’s present – also did Peg get my letter? Our mail is tied up somewhere – none of us have had a letter for over three days. Best love to all. How about the family picture?
                                                         Love
                                                               Tom.

Friday – 21st July 194454

     1005 – Battalion Commander and three Staff Officers left for 182nd F.A Group.  (Captain E.
               Murphy Battery “A”, 2nd Lt. Ernest Meyer Battery “C” and WOJG Mr. Harry J. Greer
               Service Battery)

Sunday – 22nd July 194455

     1645 – Battalion commander and party arrive back at Base Camp.

Dear Family,

     Another news report!! I had a real big day for letters yesterday – four of em. Two from Peg one from you and one from Jane. You have all been real swell with your letters, I sure do enjoy them all. I  love to hear from Dad to.

     I have had a new job given to me – it’s only for as long as were stationed here. I’m the “post adjutant”. Col. Davis is Post Commander. It’s a good job, but it keeps me inside too much. I put out all the orders for the Post C. O. don’t know how long it will last, but I’m going to do my darnedest to make a go of it.

     Got a big kick out of your letters when you try to speculate on my where abouts. I can just hear all of you arguing about it – each very sure of the location. Then dad try’s to reason it out and you all get mad and quit. You have been all wrong on my locations so far. Dex was wrong, Standish was wrong – someday I’ll tell you! It’s really restricted info. Sorry. Keep on guessing though you may hit it. Have you received the RR Express ticket yet? Clue #1. Coyne, Wink, Torres & I went to an A.T.S. (not ours) camp to see some kids had a million laughs.

     Jane has been asking for a couple of pictures. In my scrap book there is a duplicate Daily News pic of Bet’s & I taken at the Pump room – cut it in half and scout around and send her some, please. Maybe you could go to the News “morgue” find the negative of the newspaper one and have a small (or same size) one reprinted for a buck or so – maybe mom would like one too. Our PX opened yesterday and we all bought our week’s ration of candy, cigs, cookies & peanuts. All the stuff is rationed to us. Shipping space on transports is very limited as far as we’re concerned.

     It has been real cool here. I’ve been wearing my new jacket all the time. A wool shirt, blouse & a topcoat is just right at night.

     The war news sure is good – old Hitler is sure in a rough spot. We haven’t many radios so news is scarce.

     How have my letters been coming in? I’ve tried to write every other day. Do they come in in bundles? How about times of transit between V-mail & air mail. Can you send me a couple of tubes of Pepsodant, 6 cheap hankies, bandannas will do, and the 6” mirror I spoke of? Perhaps some cookies, peanuts – no gum, I have plenty and besides I don’t chew very often.

     I have misplaced my address book – is it in the locker I sent home? It’s brown & is in a leather zipper case. Will have to close now – best love to all, keep your letters coming.
                                                                                            Your
                                                                                               Tom.
Uncle Art’s letter hasn’t come yet.

          Sgt. Robert H. Bishop, Albury Park England Just Prior To Channel Crossing

Sunday – 23rd July 194456

          Usual Camp duties.

Monday – 24th July 194457

     0630 – Battalion Commander and Assistant S-4 left for secret destination.
     1800 – Battalion Commander and Assistant S-4 returned to Base Camp

Monday – 24th July 1944 “Hq” Battery Morning Report58

                              Arbury Park, 2¼ mi SW vK7909 Nuneaton
          “Alerted for departure”

Monday – 24th July 1944 Battery “B” Morning Report59

                              Arbury Park, 2¼ mi SW, vK7909 Nuneaton
                    Harvey                             33 301 272     Cpl.
                              Dy to sk in Sta Hosp LD
          “ALERTED – FOR – DEPARTURE
                    Strength: EM present for duty 120, absent 2
                                 Officers 4

Monday – 24th July 1944 Service Battery Morning Report60

                              Arbury Park, 2½ mi SW, vK7909 Nuneaton
          “ALLERTED – FOR – DEPARTURE”
                    Strength Officers                 Strength EM
                         1 Fld O & Capt. Pres             29 Pres for Duty
                         1 1st Lt. Pres
                         1 WO Pres

24th July 1944
Battle of Normandy Ends

Battle of Northern France Begins,
25 July 1944 to 14 September 1944

Tuesday – 25th July 194462

          Battalion alerted for departure.

Tuesday – 25th July 1944 “Hq” Battery Morning Report63

                              Arbury Park, 2¼ mi SW vK7909, Nuneaton
                    Jacobi, Henry                      32 986 948     Pfc.                             Code E-FA
                              Atahd unasgd from 10th Repl Depot, ETOUSA
                              for dy, qrs and adm.
                        1 0 & 29 EM atchd unasgd from 647th QM
                        Troop Transport Co for rat, qrs and adm.
                         (See atchd roster)
          “Alerted For Departure”

Tuesday – 25th July 1944 Battery “B” Morning Report64

                              Arbury Park, 2¼ mi SW, vK7909 Nuneaton
                    Harvey (Hosp)                      33 301 272     Cpl.                             Code T-4
                              Sk in 33rd Tat Hosp LD to trfd to Det of
                              Patient 33rd Sta Hos[p
                    Cimbulich (Hosp)                    35 915 548     Pvt.
                              Sk in 33rd Sta HOsp LD to DS as patient
                              52nd GH 24 July 44
                    Corrigan                               32 905 146     Pvt.
                              Dy to sk 33rd Sta Hosp LD No EPTI
                    Fink (SD)                              42 049 263     Pvt.
                              SD to dy
                    Strength: EM present for duty 120, absent 2
                                 Officers 4

Tuesday – 25th July 1944 Service Battery Morning Report65

                              Arbury Park, 2½ mi SW, vK7909 Nuneaton
          “ALLERTED – FOR – DEPARTURE”
                   Strength Officers                          Strength EM
                         1 Fld O & Capt Pres                       29 Pres for Duty
                         1 1st Lt. Pres
                         1 WO Pres

Colonial Davis66
          Colonel Davis Papers

           I had a call from General Patton’s Third Army Headquarters in France, from a friend of mine, Colonel Heitman.  He told me that we were going to be assigned a special mission, to come right over across the channel and take over the Third Army prisoner of war enclosure on Utah Beach. The beach of the Third Army Prisoner of War Enclosure was being guarded by the 2nd Ranger Battalion of the First Army, and they very badly wanted to release it and get it on up into the fighting.

Wednesday – 26th July 194467

   0815 – Battalion Commander and advance party departed
             Aubury Park, 2½ mi SW (vK7909), Nuneaton, England.
             Arrived Chickerell, 1 mi S (vU0800).
   0950 – Battalion departed Aubury Park, 2 ½ mi SW (vK7909)
             Nuneaton, England via motor convoy.  Arrived Chickerell,
             1 mi S (vU0800) at 2230.  Distance marched 180 miles.
             Weather:   Clear:  Moral:  Excellent

Wednesday – 26th July 194468
          Battalion alerted for departure.

          We departed on the 26th of July for the marshalling yards at Portland Harbor without equipment.  The Battalion by-passed several divisions and ordinary processing in a reord trip from the Stated to France.  We  boarded the LST 315 and 316 and without incident crossed the Channel.

Wednesday – 26th July 194469

          Departed Aubury Park

Wednesday – 26th July 194470

          Left Arbury Park and arrived Weymouth England

Wednesday – 26th July 194471

          Arrived Chickerell England

Wednesday – 26th July 194472
          Byron G. Rogers

          July 26, 1944, we boarded L.S.T. boats and crossed the English Channel without incidence.  We landed on Utah Beach at Normandy the next day under the heaviest fighting we’d ever seen.  This was the 4th Division’s D-Day Beach Head, and we had been assigned to the 4th Division.  At Normandy we assembled the battalion, and moved to St. Jores, a little deeper into Normandy.  At this time, we would assume the duties of operating the Third U.S Army Prisoner of War Camp, taking over for the 1st Army’s 2nd Ranger Battalion.  We lost a tremendous number of men during this time.  Hedgerows were so thick the tanks could not get through, so movement was stalled.  There were 3 to 4 foot high dirt fences with tall hedges, man-made barriers, all through France. In later battles, some of the tanks were fitted with a set of cutter blades on front to in able them to go through or over the hedges.  In Mets, France, the entire 3rd Army ran out of fuel and was stranded for 4 or 5 days.  That gave the Germans time to dig in and reinforce their supplies.  During these times I realized that God was taking care of us or we would not have made it out alive.  The battalion was in a real hot spot.  The entire area was mined and/or booby-trapped.  The war was so close that American and German dead were still in the areas.

Wednesday – 26th July 1945 “Hq” Battery Morning Report73

                              Chickerall, 1 mi S vU0800 England
          Departed Arbury Park, 1¼  mi SW vK7909
          Nuneaton, England 0900 via Motor Convoy,
          Arr present Sta 2230, Distance marched
          180 mi.
                    Strength Officers:  1 Capt.
                                              1 1st Lt.
                                              3 2nd Lt.
                                              1 2ND Lt. Attached FR Other Orgn
                                              1 WO.
                    Strength EM: 95 EM Assigned
                                              1 Attached Unassigned
                                             29 Attached FR Other Orgn
                                            125 EM Total

Wednesday – 26th July 1944 Battery “B” Morning Report74

                             Arbury Park, 2¼ mi SW, vK7909 Nuneaton
                    Cimbulich (DS)                   35 915 548     Pvt.                                Code 7-A
                              DS as patient 52nd GH to trfd to Det of
                              Patients 52nd GH
                    Corrigan                            32 905 146     Pvt.                               Code T-A
                              Sk 33rd Sta Hosp LD No EPTI to frfd to
                              Det of Patients 182nd GH
          Departed Arbury Park 2¼ SW, vK7909
          Nuneaton, England 0900 via motor convoy.
          Arr prestnt Sta 2230. Distance marched
          180 mi.

Wednesday – 26th July 1944 Battery “C” Morning Report75

                              Chickerell, 1 mi S vU0800, England
                    Lindsey (DS)                       34 339 595     Cpl.                               Code T
                              DS as Patient 81st Gen Hosp, APO 516, to
                              trfd in gr Det of Patients, 81st Gen
                              Hosp, APO 516
          Departed Arbury Park 1¼ mi. SW, vK7909
          Nuneaton, England 0900 via Motor Convoy.
          Arr present Sta 2230. Distance Marched
          180 mi.

Wednesday – 26th July 1944 MD Detachment Morning Report76

                              Chickerell, 1 mi S vU0800, England
          Departed Arbury Park, 2¼ mi SW vK7909.
          Nuneaton, England, 0900 via Motor Convoy
          Arr present Sta 2230. Distance marched
          180 mi.

Thursday – 27th July 194477

          Usual camp duties preparatory to embarkation.

Thursday – 27th July 1944 “HQ” Battery Morning Report78

                              Chickerall, 1 mi S vU0800 England
          “ALURTED FOR DEARTURE”

Thursday – 27th July 1944 Battery “B” Morning Report79

                              Chickerell 1 mi S vU0800 England
          “ALERTED – FOR – DEPARTURE”

Thursday – 27th July 1944 Battery “C” Morning Report80

                              Chickerell, 1 mi S vU0800
                    Yarbrough (SD)                               34 359 958     Sgt.
                    Smith (SD)                                     32 556 558     Pfc.
                              Above 2 EM SD Bn PX to Dy.
          “ALERTED –FOR –DEPARTURE”

          Landing craft and LST’s loading for the crossing to France

July 1944
          1st Lt. Marriott – V-Letters Home (Three), From England

V-Letter One (One of Three)

Dear Mom,

     Here we go again! I’ll try to give you the picture as best I can without giving any real dope away. We are on our way again. We are all safely aboard ship and headed for a new adventure. We had a fine convoy to this port – only a few people got lost in the towns we passed thru. We slept in an old tent camp by the ocean for two nights and it was darn cool. John, Harry Grier, Red Hendry and I went to the local Pub for a few beers and wound up with a real headache. We were up at 0400 and moved a little while later on. Being at this port and seeing the activity one can imagine the magnitude of the invasion – believe me – you can’t possibly understand the huge transportation problem that they surmounted.

V-Letter Two (Two of Three)

      But I will give you more of that at a later date. About England. In our travels we went to Birmingham – a huge industrial city – which was pretty well gutted in the Blitz of “40. It’s a nice city, but rather dirty. John, Wink and I went to a large park there and even in wartime it was well kept and very pretty. At 1600 we had tea at the allied officers club. We then drove to Coventry – was almost demolished, some areas are just wrecks, almost everyone there lost someone in the bombing. A great percentage of the churches were wrecked. It was there we met the 3 A.T.S. gals. We went there quite often. Stratford on-Avon is terribly pretty – Shakespeare was born there – you know. Tewkesbury, Nuneaton, Warwick, Evesham are all real points of interest. Someday you three should come here for a vacation, it would be well worth the money.
July 4th.

V-Letter Three (Three of Three)

     I wrote to Don a few days ago to congratulate him on his promotion. I’m sure glad he got it – and I know you all are very proud of him. This has been a rather sketchy letter – hope you don’t mind. I have gotten your #13 letter. The mail has been sort of off and on – letters come in bundles. Hope mine have come in regularly. I’ve tried to write every two or three days – god and the Army permitting. All of us are well. Jane has been marvelous in her writing. I’ve really got something there. Next month you should get about $165 on my govt. check. Save it for me – I’m going to need a reserve when I get home – ‘cause that young lady and I are going to get married. OK??

     My best love to you all.
                                          Yours
                                             Tom.

          LST-315 was laid down on 15 October 1942 at the New York Navy Yard Brooklyn; launched on 28 January 1943; sponsored by Miss Helen Clair Leuteritz; and commissioned on 3 February 1943.

     During World War II, LST-315 was assigned to the European theater and participated in the following operations:

          Sicilian occupation – July and August 1943

          Salerno landings – September 1943

          Invasion of Normandy – June 1944

     The tank landing ship was transferred to the United Kingdom on 9 December 1944 and returned to United States Navy custody on 16 March 1946 and decommissioned. She was struck from the Navy list on 26 February 1946 and sold, on 5 December 1947, to Bosey, Philippines.

     LST-315 earned three battle stars for World War II service.

Royal Navy History

     Commissioned into the Royal Navy as HM LST-315, 30 November 1944 HM LST-315 participated in the following operations:

     Relief of southern Norway

     As part of “W” Task Force HM LST-315 worked down the Arakan coast of Burma and participated in the recapture of Rangoon, before proceeding to the eventual invasion of Malaya at Morib and Port Swettenham, and so to Singapore and Bangkok etc. doing relief work repatriating ex P.O.W.s of the Japanese.

     Paid off Singapore and returned to US Navy custody at Subic Bay, Philippines, 16 March 1946.  Struck from the Royal Naval Register, 26 February 1946.  Final disposition, sold, 5 December 1947, to Bosey, Philippines, fate unknown.

          USS LST-316 was laid down on 15 October 1942 at the New York Navy Yard Brooklyn; launched on 28 January 1943; sponsored by Mrs. Pearl Magdalene Frick; and commissioned on 3 February 1943.

     During World War II, LST-316 was assigned to the European theater and participated in the following operations:

     Sicilian occupation-July 1943

     Salerno landings-September 1943

     Invasion of Normandy-June 1944

     Upon her return to the United States, she was decommissioned on 24 May 1945 and struck from the Navy list on 12 March 1946. On 23 December 1946, she was sold to James Hughes, Inc., New York, N.Y., for conversion to merchant. service.  LST-316 earned three battle stars for World War II

Authors Note –
          LST, Landing Ship Tank also known as “Large Slow Target” by those who were aboard.

Thursday – 27th July 194487

          The battalion arrived Utah Beach France, La Madeleine, the 4th Divisions D-Day Beach Head.

Thursday – 27th July 194488

          We pulled on to Utah Beach (Banc de Madelaine) the following day amidst the most spectacular display of shipping any of us had ever seen.  Here we saw our first air attack and upon landing got our first view of the holocaust of war for this was the 4th Division’s D-Day Beach Head.  In the afternoon we bivouacked at St. Jaques to assemble the Battalion.

Thursday – 27th July 194489

          The Battalion arrived St. Jaques France and bivouacked there that afternoon to assemble the Battalion.

Friday – 28th July 194490

          On 28 July, on verbal orders of Lieutenant General Bradley, commanding General of Twelfth U.S. Army Group, Lieutenant General Patton assumed operational command of all troops then in the VIII Corps Zone, and, acting on Deputy Army Group Commander, supervised the lightning-like follow-up with which the enemy was hit by that Corps.  The 4th and 6th Armored Divisions were quickly thrown in, followed closely by the 8th and 79th Infantry Divisions, to drive rough shod to the south over a demoralized and rapidly retreating enemy.  Lieutenant General Patton’s role at this time fitted generally into plans for the coming entire Third U.S. Army operations as it was initially planned that VIII and XV corps would come under Third U.S. Army command when this Army became operational.

Friday – 28th July 194491

          Battalion departed Chickerell, 1 mi S (vU0800), England at 0610.  Embarked aboard LST 316 at 1030 at Portland Harbor, England.  Weather:  Clear:  Morale:  Excellent.

Friday – 28th July 194492

          Battalion departed Chickerell (to France on an L.S.T. 315 & 316 – landed Utah Beach La Madelaine, Lower Normandy France)

Friday – 28th July 194493

          Boarded L.S.T. #316

Friday – 28th July 1944 “HQ” Battery Morning Report94

                              Aboard US LST 316
          Departed Chickerall, 1 mi S vU0800,
          England at 0610. Embarked Aboard US
          LST 316 at 1030 in Portland Harbor,
          England

Friday – 28th July 1944 “Hq” Battery Morning Report95

                              Aboard US LST 316
                    Garland                             01 185 292     1st Lt.
                    Hightower                          01 179 097     2nd Lt.
                              Above two G’S dy to temporary dy on auth
                              Aerial flight.
          Departed Chickerall, 1 mi S vU0800 England
          at 0610. Embarked aboard US LST 316
          at 1030 in Portland Harbor, England
                    Strength Officers:  1 Capt.
                                             1 1st Lt.
                                             2 2nd Lt., 1 Attached FR Other Orgn
                                             1 WO
                    Strength EM: 95 EM Present For Duty
                                             1 Attached Unassigned
                                            29 Attached FM Other Orgn
                                           125 EM Total

Note on above HQ Morning Report:
         Garland                             01 185 292     1st Lt.
         Hightower                          01 179 097     2nd Lt.
                   Above two G’S dy to temporary dy on auth Aerial flight.
Garland and Hightower each flew one Battalion Liaison aircraft to France.

Friday – 28TH July 1944 Battery ”B” Morning Report96

                              ABOARD US LST 316
                              NO CHANGE
                              RECORD OF EVENTS
          Departed Chickerell 1 mi S vU0800 at
          0610 Embarked aboard US LST 316 at 1030
          in Portland Harbor, England

Friday – 28th July 1944 Battery “C” Morning Report97

                             Aboard US LST 536
          Departed Chickerell, 1 mi. S vU
          0800, England at 0610. Embarked
          aboard US LST 536 at 1030 in
          Portland Harbor, England.

          LST 536 was laid down, 19th October 1943, at Missouri Valley Bridge and Iron Co., Evansville, IN. and launched, 27th December 1943.  Commissioned USS LST-536, 9th February 1944, LT. Charles A. Flood, USNR, in command.  During World War II USS LST-536 was first assigned to the Europe-Africa-Middle Theater and later to the Asiatic-Pacific Theater and participated in the following campaign:  Invasion of Normandy, 6th to 25th June 1944 and earned one battle star for World War II service

     Decommissioned, 23rd January 1946 and assigned to Commander Naval Forces Far East (COMNAVFE) Shipping Control Authority for Japan (SCAJAP), redesignated Q024.  Struck from the Naval Register, 25th February 1946 and transferred to the Republic of Korea, 21st February 1947.  Final Disposition, fate unknown.

Specifications:
     Displacement 1625 t.(lt)
                         4,080 t.(fl) (sea-going draft w/1675-ton load)
                          2,366 t. (beaching displacement)
     Length: 328′ o.a.
     Beam: 50′
     Draft: light 2′ 4″ fwd, 7′ 6″ aft
              sea-going 8′ 3″ fwd, 14′ 1″ aft
              landing 3′ 11″ fwd 9′ 10″ aft (landing w/500 ton load)
              limiting 11′ 2″maximum navigation 14′ 1″
     Speed: 11.6 kts. (trial)
     Endurance: 24,000 miles @ 9kts. while displacing 3960 tons
     Complement: 13 officers104 enlisted
     Troop Accommodations: 16 officers147 enlisted
     Boats: 2 LCVP
     Cargo Capacity: (varied with mission – payloads between 1600 and 1900 tons).  Typical                                   loads One Landing Craft Tank (LCT), tanks, wheeled and tracked vehicles,                               artillery, construction equipment and military supplies. A ramp or elevator
                             forward allowed vehicles access to tank deck from main deck.

     Additional capacity included sectional pontoons carried on each side of vessel amidships, to either build Rhino Barges or use as causeways.  Married to the bow ramp, the causeways would enable payloads to be delivered ashore from deeper water or where a beachhead would not allow the vessel to be grounded forward after ballasting.

     Armament: (varied with availability when each vessel was outfitted. Retrofitting was                                accomplished throughout WWII. The ultimate armament design for United                              States vessels was2 – Twin 40MM gun mounts w/Mk. 51 directors4 – Single                               40MM gun mounts12 single 20MM gun mounts
     Fuel Capacity: Diesel 4,300 Bbls
     Propulsion: Two General Motors 12-567A, 900hp Diesel engines with single Falk Main                                 Reduction Gears, three Diesel-drive 100Kw 230V D.C. Ship’s Service Generators
                       two propellers, 1,700 shp twin rudders.

Dear Family,

     Sorry about the laps of letters but have been busy. It’s sure fun to hear from all of you so often. The three of you have kept me very happy with your newsy letters. Keep it up! I sure get a bang out of your speculation as to our whereabouts – as yet I haven’t gotten any of your letters written after receiving one of mine. I sure hope you all are well and happy – ‘cause were all in the pink. The weather here is cool! My woolies are going on in a day or so. Looked for Bob Nissen, but guess I need more info as to his whereabouts.

      I’ll have a lot to write about in a few days. My love to one and all. Try not to worry too much about us – we’re all over 21 and very careful
   Love your Tom.

Saturday – 29th July 1944100

          Departed Portland Harbor, England aboard US LST 316 at 0700 en-route to France.

Saturday – 29th July 1944101

          Travelled English Channel

Saturday – 29th July 1944 ”HQ” Battery Morning Report102

                              Aboard US LST 316
          Departed Portland Harbor, England aboard
          US LST 316 at 0700 enroute to France.
                    Strength Officers:  1 Capt.
                                            1 1st Lt.
                                            2 2nd Lt., 1 Attached FR Other Orgn
                                            1 WO.
                    Strength EM: 95 EM Present For Duty
                                        1 Attached Unassigned
                                       29 Attached FM Other Orgn
                                     125 EM Total

Saturday – 29th July 1944 Battery “B” Morning Report103

                              ABOARD US LST 316
                              NO CHANGE
          RECORD OF EVENTS
          Departed Portland Harbor, England aboard
          US LST 316 at 0700 enroute to France.

Saturday – 29th July 1944 Battery “C” Morning Report104

          Departed Portland Harbor, England
          aboard US LST 536 at 0700 enroute
          to France.

Saturday – 29th July 1944 Service Battery Morning Report105 

                             Aboard US LST 1082
          Departed Portland Harbor, England
          aboard US LST 1082 at 0700 enroute
          to France
                    Strength Officers                     Strength EM
                    1 Fld O & Capt Pres                 29 Pres for Duty
                    1 1st Lt. Pres
                    1 WO Pres

          The above Service Battery Morning Report is inaccurate.  Both the US National Archives and the British National Archives agree there was no LST 1082 used in the European Theater of Operation with the number LST 1082.
   This error is repeated here July 29, and again on July 30 and 31.  Below is a copy of the Service Battery Morning Report of July 30 detailing the error.
     I continue to research this as the Service Battery was transported to France on something.

Breakout and Pursuit
Exploitation 30 – 31 July 1944

          XII Corps Spearhead of Patton’s Third Army, Lt. Co. George Dyer, Breakout And Pursuit, Page 778, July 30 to August 31, 1944

Sunday – 30th July 1944106

      Debarked US LST 316 at 1100 at La Madeleine, France.  Bivouacked at St. Jacques, France at 2100.

Sunday – 30th July 1944107

          Upon debarkation at La Madeleine, France on 30th July 1944, the Battalion was attached to the Provost Marshal, Third U.S. Army, with the mission of manning and administrating Third U.S. Army Prisoner of War Enclosures.

Sunday – 30th July 1944108

      The Battalion departed St. Jacques France.

Sunday – 30th July 1944109

          France

Sunday – 30th July 1944 “HQ” Battery Morning Report110

                              St. Jacques, France 1½ mi E
          Debarked from US LST 316 1100 at Banc
          De La Madeleine. Bivouacked present
          Station 2100.
                    Strength Officers:  1 Capt.
                                              1 1st Lt.
                                              2 2nd Lt., 1 Attached FR Other Orgn
                                              1 WO.
                    Strength EM: 95 EM Present For Duty
                                        1 Attached Unassigned
                                       29 Attached FM Other Orgn

Sunday – 30th July 1944, Battery “A” Morning Report111

                              St. Jacques ¼ mi E. France
          Debarked from US-LST 316 1100
          at Blanc de la Madeliane. Bivouac
          present Station 2100
                    Strength; EM 123, Officers 4

Sunday – 30th July 1944 Battery “B” Morning Report112

                              St. Jacques, France 1½ Mi E
                              NO CHANGE
          RECORD FO EVENTS
          Debarked from US LST 316 1100 at Blanc de la Madeliane, Bivouacked present sta
          2100.

Sunday – 30th July 1944 Service Battery Morning Report113

                              Aboard US LST 1082
                              No Change
                    Strength Officers                          Strength EM
                    1 Fld O & Capt Pres                      29 Pres for Duty
                    1 1st Lt. Pres
                    1 WO Pres

July 1944
          Section III – Prisoner Of War Sub-Section114

          Upon arrival in France, efforts were made to secure the services of the Military Police Escort Guard Companies.  None were available in the Theater, and it was recommended that a battalion unit of approximately 750 personnel be utilized for the mission of escorting, guarding, and processing prisoners of war.  As a temporary measure Field Artillery Battalions with low priority were to be used.

July 1944115
Section III – Prisoner Of War Sub-Section

          The 693rd Field Artillery Battalion was attached to the Provost Marshal section for escort guard work.  Training was conducted in all phased of prisoner of war work.  The 693rd Field Artillery Battalion was assigned to its primary duty before the Army became operational, and the 244th Field Artillery Battalion replaced it in prisoner of war work.  This new battalion was oriented and given instructions in all phases of prisoner of war duties.

Interview with Robert Bishop116

          My name is Robert H. Bishop, and my Serial Number is 20 1405 39, and I was a Sergeant, a Buck Sergeant and chief of Section Number 4 Gun in Battery B, the 244th Field Artillery Battalion Third Army.  Our primary weapon was a 155mm Long Tom, and this was known as General Pershing’s favorite during World War I, or in our time, it was the King of Battle.

     We landed on Utah Beach on July 21st minus our weapons, and we relieved the Second Ranger Battalion First Army at the PW post and hauled prisoners back from the front and got at the POW cage, it was there, and we did this for quite awhile, and we were very busy, too.

          Caption reads – People Crowding Around Trucks and Speaking to Soldiers

Monday – 31st July 1944117

     Usual Camp duties.

Monday – 31st July 1944118

          France

Monday – 31st July 1944119

         On 31 July the Forward Echelon of Headquarters moved to a new Command Post generally north of Muneville Le Bingard (T25) five miles northwest of Coutances.

Monday – 31st July 1944 “HQ” Battery Morning Report120

                              St. Jacques, France 1½ mi E
          Final Report
          All personnel trfd to HQ & Hq
          Btry M/R as of 0100 this date

Monday – 31st July 1944 “HQ & Hq” Battery Morning Report121

                             St. Jacques, France 1½ mi E
                    Jacobi (atchd unasgd)       32 986 943  Pfc.  Code K-R
                              Reld from atchd unasgd and trfd to 3rd FO Bn.
                    Personnel previously reported on M/R of
                    “HQ, 244th FA Bn trfd to this and
                    reported as “HQ & Hq Btry, 244th FA Bn”
                    as of 0001 this date.
                    Strength Officers:  1 1st Lt.
                                              1 1st Lt. Abs’t
                                              2 2nd Lt.
                                              1 2nd Lt. Attached FR
                                                     Other Orgn
                                              1 WO.
                    Strength EM: 95 EM Present For Duty
                                      29 Attached FM Other Orgn
                                     124 EM Total

Monday – 31st July 1944 Battery “B” Morning Report122

                              St. Jacques, France 1½ mi E
          NO CHANGE

Monday – 31st July 1944 Battery ”C” Morning Report123

                              St. Jacques, France, 1 1/8 mi. E
          Debarked from US LST 536 0005 at
          Banc de la Madeleine, Bivouacked
          present Station 2130.

Monday – 31st July 1944 Service Battery Morning Report124

                              St. Jacques, France 1¼ mi E
          Departed from US LST 1082 at Banc de
          la Madeleine 0100. Arr at present
          Sta 2000.
                    Strength Officers:  1 Fld O & Capt Pres                      
                                             1 1st Lt. Pres
                                             1 WO Pres

                    Strength EM:  29 Pres for Duty

          Caption reads  – Country People of Normandie France

Dear Family,

     Another day another country La Belle France! I will try and give you the picture – so much as I know and can tell – We landed on a glorious day – during our early lunch we were told to go and boy – we went – the big doors swung open and the first truck hit the ramp – there was intense activity all over the place. We drove for a while thru winding country lanes – which had long since been blasted bare. We didn’t see many civilians for a while, till we got further inland. We parked in an open field – rearranging the trucks and getting all our stuff in shape. Later on in the day we moved to our present location. Wink’s Battery and Galway’s Battery haven’t come in yet – in fact that’s what we’re waiting for now. Andy just said they came in five minutes ago. To go on – we set up camp here in some fields – I was OD so I slept at the CP and didn’t get any breakfast till 0900 – so I was lucky enough to get four eggs – with shells – not powdered. We have just been lying around all day improving our camouflage and digging slit trenches. During supper a youngster named Daniel (7 year) came over – we fed him and boy he was really hungry. The four boys from New Hamp. really were tossing the French around. It was cute – first he went to all the officers – said “Bon Jour” shook hands and then he dug in.

     Sargent Reeves (supply) and I went over to his house (farm). Talked to his grandmother, mother and father who had just come home – he was taken away by the Germans. Reeves was interpreter – grandma talked a blue streak – they asked us in for a while – gave us some cider – after a bit – we left – they had given us hay to sleep on too. They all are very nice to us. Mama – said Daniel stood by the road all day – while the first yanks came – hollering Vive L’ American, Vive La France till he make himself sick. The country here is a lot like England, but not so well kept. Their cattle is thin, their fields not to well kept – but all this is because of the Germans. Some of the towns are completely destroyed – yet they all come out and say “Bon Jour” etc. We have given most of our cigs, candy, c-rations away – they are most grateful. I will give you more news in my next letter. I guess we can’t expect any mail to reach us for several days – we will see though. We all sure do love to hear from home. Keep your letters coming.
                                           Yours
                                                  Tom.

July 1944
  1. Department of The Army, USH&EC, USAMHI, 202-244th 1945, “History of The 244th Field Artillery Battalion During World War II
  2. Troop Ships Of WW II, Ronald W. Charles, The Army Transportation Association Washington, D.C., First Addition April 1947, Page 229
  3. Patrick Feng
  4. Patrick Feng
  5. W. U. (Doc) Savage Letter, December 15, 1949
  6. PFC Harry G. MacDuffee, B Battery, 244th Field Artillery - Battery Record
  7. 244th F.A. Battalion Battery HQ Morning Report
  8. 244th F.A. Battalion Battery Hq Morning Report
  9. 244th F.A. Battalion Battery C Morning Report
  10. W. U. (Doc) Savage Letter, December 15, 1949
  11. USAMHI Archives, Colonel J. Davis Interview
  12. Department of The Army, USH&EC, USAMHI, 202-244th 1945, “History of The 244th Field Artillery Battalion During World War II
  13. Serving In Harm's Way, A Record of My Service In The U.S. Army and WWII, Byron G. Rogers jr., January 2006
  14. PFC Harry G. MacDuffee, B Battery, 244th Field Artillery - Battery Record
  15. 244th F.A. Battalion Headquarters Morning Report
  16. 244th F.A. Battalion Battery Hq Morning Report
  17. 244th F.A.Battalion Battery C Morning Report
  18. 244th F.A. Battalion Battery C Morning Report
  19. 244th F.A. Battalion Battery C Morning Report
  20. 244th F.A. Battalion Headquarters & Battery Hq Morning Report
  21. 244th F.A. Battalion Battery Hq Morning Report
  22. 244th F.A. Battalion Battery Hq Morning Report
  23. 244th F.A. Battalion Battery C Morning Report
  24. 244th Field Artillery Battalion Journal Report
  25. Department of The Army, USH&EC, USAMHI, 202-244th 1945, “History of The 244th Field Artillery Battalion During World War II
  26. U.S. Army Military History Institute, Archives Branch, Colonel Davis Papers
  27. Serving In Harm's Way, A Record of My Service In The U.S. Army and WWII, Byron G. Rogers jr., January 2006
  28. PFC Harry G. MacDuffee, B Battery, 244th Field Artillery - Battery Record
  29. 244th F.A. Battalion Battery HQ Morning Report
  30. 244th F.A. Battalion Battery Hq Morning Report
  31. 244th F.A. Battalion Battery C Morning Report
  32. 244th Field Artillery Battalion Journal Report
  33. U. S. Army Heritage and Education Center, U.S. Army Military History Institute 202-244th 1945, “History of The 244thField Artillery Battalion During World War II, Page 2
  34. HQ, 244th F.A. Bn., APO 403, Major Carey A. Clark Commanding
  35. PFC Harry G. MacDuffee, B Battery, 244th Field Artillery - Battery Record
  36. 244th F.A. Battalion Battery HQ Morning Report
  37. 244th F.A. Battalion Battery Hq Morning Report
  38. 244th F.A. Battalion Battery C Morning Report
  39. 244th Field Artillery Battalion Journal Report
  40. W. U. (Doc) Savage Letter, December 15, 1949
  41. 244th Field Artillery Battalion Journal Report
  42. 244th Field Artillery Battalion Journal Report
  43. 244th Field Artillery Battalion Journal Report
  44. 244th Field Artillery Battalion Journal Report
  45. 244th Field Artillery Battalion Journal Report
  46. 244th F.A. Battalion Battery C Morning Report
  47. 244th Field Artillery Battalion Journal Report
  48. 244th F.A. Battalion Battery HQ Morning Report
  49. 244th Field Artillery Battalion Journal Report
  50. 244th F.A. Battalion Battery HQ Morning Report
  51. 244th F.A. Battalion Battery Hq Morning Report
  52. 244th F.A. Battalion Battery C Morning Report
  53. 244th F.A. Battalion Battery MD Morning Report
  54. 244th Field Artillery Battalion Journal Report
  55. 244th Field Artillery Battalion Journal Report
  56. 244th Field Artillery Battalion Journal Report
  57. 244th Field Artillery Battalion Journal Report
  58. 244th F.A. Battalion Battery Hq Morning Report
  59. 244th F.A. Battalion Battery B Morning Report
  60. 244th F.A. Battalion Battery SB Morning Report
  61. The U.S. Army Center of Military History, William M. Hammond
  62. 244th Field Artillery Battalion Journal
  63. 244th F.A. Battalion Battery Hq Morning Report
  64. 244th F.A. Battalion Battery B Morning Report
  65. 244th F.A. Battalion Battery SB Morning Report
  66. Colonel Davis Papers
  67. 244th Field Artillery Battalion Journal Report
  68. Department of The Army, USH&EC, USAMHI, 202-244th 1945, “History of The 244th Field Artillery Battalion During World War II
  69. Department of The Army, USH&EC, USAMHI, 202-244th 1945, “History of The 244th Field Artillery Battalion During World War II
  70. PFC Harry G. MacDuffee, B Battery, 244th Field Artillery - Battery Record
  71. W. U. (Doc) Savage Letter, December 15, 1949
  72. Serving In Harm's Way, A Record of My Service In The U.S. Army and WWII, Byron G. Rogers jr., January 2006
  73. 244th F.A. Battalion Battery Hq Morning Report
  74. 244th F.A. Battalion Battery B Morning Report
  75. 244th F.A. Battalion Battery C Morning Report
  76. 244th F.A. Battalion Battery MD Morning Report
  77. 244th Field Artillery Battalion Journal Report
  78. 244th F.A. Battalion Battery HQ Morning Report
  79. 244th F.A. Battalion Battery B Morning Report
  80. 244th F.A. Battalion Battery C Morning Report
  81. Robert Hurst
  82. NavSource Online: Amphibious Photo Archive
  83. US Navy photo from "All Hands" magazine, November 1943 issue, Joe Radigan MACM USN Ret.
  84. NavSource Online: Amphibious Photo Archive
  85. Ron Reeves
  86. Mike Sector on D+1 (7 June 1944), Joe Radigan MACM USN Ret.
  87. U. S. Army Heritage and Education Center, U.S. Army Military History Institute 202-244th 1945, “History of The 244th Field Artillery Battalion During World War II, Page 2
  88. Department of The Army, USH&EC, USAMHI, 202-244th 1945, “History of The 244th Field Artillery Battalion During World War II
  89. U. S. Army Heritage and Education Center, U.S. Army Military History Institute 202-244th 1945, “History of The 244th Field Artillery Battalion During World War II, Page 2
  90. 3rd Army After Action Report, Volume I, Chapter 2 – Pre-Operational Phase On The Continent, Page 13
  91. 244th Field Artillery Battalion Journal Report
  92. W. U. (Doc) Savage Letter, December 15, 1949
  93. PFC Harry G. MacDuffee, B Battery, 244th Field Artillery - Battery Record
  94. 244th F.A. Battalion Battery HQ Morning Report
  95. 244th F.A. Battalion Battery Hq Morning Report
  96. 244th F.A. Battalion Battery B Morning Report
  97. 244th F.A. Battalion Battery C Morning Report
  98. NavSource Online: Amphibious Photo Archive
  99. Kenneth D. Johnston for his father Ernest Glenn Johnston SC/3 USS LST-536
  100. 244th Field Artillery Battalion Journal Report
  101. PFC Harry G. MacDuffee, B Battery, 244th Field Artillery - Battery Record
  102. 244th F.A. Battalion Battery HQ Morning Report
  103. 244th F.A. Battalion Battery B Morning Report
  104. 244th F.A. Battalion Battery C Morning Report
  105. 244th F.A. Battalion Battery SB Morning Report
  106. 244th Field Artillery Battalion Journal Report
  107. 244th Field Artillery Battalion After Action Report, 1 December to 31 December
  108. W. U. (Doc) Savage Letter, December 15, 1949
  109. PFC Harry G. MacDuffee, B Battery, 244th Field Artillery - Battery Record
  110. 244th F.A. Battalion Battery HQ Morning Report
  111. 244th F.A. Battalion Battery A Morning Report
  112. 244th F.A. Battalion Battery B Morning Report
  113. 244th F.A. Battalion Battery SB Morning Report
  114. Third U.S. Army After Action Report, Volume II, Part 19 – Provost Marshal, Page 3
  115. Third U.S. Army After Action Report, Volume II, Part 19- Provost Marshal, Page 3
  116. Library of Congress, American Folklife Center, Veterans History Project
  117. 244th Field Artillery Battalion Journal Report
  118. PFC Harry G. MacDuffee, B Battery, 244th Field Artillery - Battery Record
  119. HQ, 244th F.A. Bn., APO 403, Major Carey A. Clark Commanding, Letter to Officers and Enlisted Men, History of the 244th, 26th June 1945
  120. 244th F.A. Battalion Battery HQ Morning Report
  121. 244th F.A. Battalion Battery HQ & Hq Morning Report
  122. 244th F.A. Battalion Battery B Morning Report
  123. 244th F.A. Battalion Battery C Morning Report
  124. 244th F.A. Battalion Battery SB Morning Report