244th Field Artillery Battalion

May 1944

          Camp Gordon – Railroad Platform

Thursday – 4th May 19441
          Basic Load For Field Artillery

“Per Weapon” Figures

Weapons AmmunitionCarried on IndividualsCarried in Prime MoverCarried in 5th Sec.TotalRemarks
Carbine, Cal. .306060
Pistol, Cal. .452121
Cal. .45 SMG9090180
Rifle, Cal. .30 M190350 5055% Ball, 40% AP, 5% Tr.
Rifle, Cal. .30 M1808055% Ball, 40% AP, 5% Tr.
Gun, Mach. Cal. .50785785AP-I-Tr (2-2-1)
Launcher, Rocket, AT44
Launcher, Grenade, M8 for Carbine M121350% AP, 50% Frag.
Grenade, Rifle, Smk. Colored, T8E110Per Battery. Types and Quantities to conform to SOI.
Grenade, Rifle, Smk. Colored, M16 or M1810Per Battery. Types and Quantities to conform to SOI.
Flare, Troop, Recognition, YellowTypes and Quantities to conform to SOI.
Grenade, Hand, Smk, HC M82Per vehicle except motorcycle
Grenade, Hand, Incendiary, M148Per Battalion or Gp Hq                                                                                                      
4Per Battery
1Per Mtr Vehicle except Medical
5Per Gun or How. 75mm or larger
Grenade, Hand, Frag 100Per Battalion, Distribution discretionary w/C.O.
Grenade, Hand, Off., w/fuze100Per Battalion, Distribution discretionary w/C.O.
Gun, 155mm Tractor Drawn36549085% Shell HE, 15% Shell, Smoke WP
Fuses:10% M67A1, 70% M51A1, 30% M55A1
Propelling Charge:100%
Gun, 155mm Trk Drawn*1589104Same as 155mm Gun (Trk Dr) above

*T/0 & E 6-357 and T/0 & E 6-367 will be changed to provide one 21/2-ton truck w/trailer per weapon; pending availability of 10-ton ammunition trailer.

Friday – 5th May 19442
          Operation Overlord Troop Priority List

    List                             Units In
Index No.               Continuous Priority               Personnel    Vehicles
  2258 B        244th FA Bn (155mm G) (Trk or Trac)         562           115

Foot Notes On Artillery3

     For latest instruction on cleaning and preserving materials, see proper Technical Manuals and W.D Lubrication Guide (Check-chart) for specific weapons.

     Ordnance personnel:  Check list OFSB 6-series for latest instructions pertaining to specific weapon.  Note especially OFSB 6-3 through 6-11 for general instructions, including special lubricant for cold weather operation.

     Allowance for the weapons also include necessary supplies for Fire Control instruments and Remote Control equipment, including motor generator units.  Weapons mounted on self-propelled carriages have supplies for the mount, but not for the carriage.  Allowances for self-propelled carriages must be figured from the table on Vehicles.

          10. a. Grease, O.D., No. 0 . . . . Artillery lubricate above 32F.  In emergency, Grease, general purpose, No. 1, Grease, O.D., No. 00, or Grease, general purpose, No. 0, may be substituted.

                b. Grease, O.D., No. 00 . . . Artillery lubricant below 32F.  In emergency, Grease, general purpose, No. 0, may be substituted.

          11. Lead, white . . . . For threaded fittings of weapons used at seacoast emplacements.  One pound per weapon per month is recommended.

          12. a. Lubricant, gear, universal, S.A.E. 80. . . For use below 32F.

                b. Lubricant, gear, universal, S.A.E. 90. . . For use above 32F.  In emergency, Lubricant, gear, universal, S.A.E. 80 may be substituted.

          13. Oil, castor. . . For use with glycerin-water recoil mechanism.

          14. a. Oil, engine, S.A.E. 10. . . Artillery and generator lubricant from 32F to 0F.  In emergency, Oil, lubricating, preservative. Light, or oil, lubricating, for aircraft instruments and machine guns may be substituted, for other than engine use.

               b. For lubrication below 0F., of artillery and all bearings, gearcases, and mechanism other than in engines, substitute oil, lubricating, preservative, light.  For lubrication below 0F., of engines, dilute Oil, engine, S.A.E. 10 with 20% of gasoline or Solvent, dry cleaning.

               c. Oil, engine, S.A.E. 30. . . Artillery and generator lubricant above 32F.  In emergency, Oil, engine, S.A.E. 10 may be substituted.

          25. Soda, ash, type . . . For cleaning artillery tubes.  In emergency, hot soapy water (issue soap), hot water, or cold water may be substituted.

Sunday – 7th May 19444
          G-2 Map Plan

          2. Map Distribution

While a number of series have been published, not all are for operational use.  The following list gives the series that Third Army will use:

1/25,000 (Topographic) Special use (by Artillery, Infantry, Engineers, Hq)

          GSGS 4347

          GSGS 4365

          GSGS 4041

     8. Geodetic Data.

               a. Trig Data Sheets will be issued to Army and Corps Engineers, and to Artillery Observation Battalion.  For details see Engineer Annex No. 5.

Wednesday – 10th May 19445

Third U.S. Army Outline Plan – Operation OVERLORD
Annex No. 12-Artillery Plan
                                                               Register No. TOSA 75
ANNEX 12
TO
THIRD U.S. ARMY OUTLINE PLAN
OPERATION OVERLORD
ARTILLERY PLAN
(10 May 1944)
                                                                                PATTON
                                                                               Comdg

WILLIAM GAFFEY PA                                                       C of S

                                  ARTILLERY PLAN
     1. Mission: Effective artillery support of combat elements under all possible eventualities of battle.
     2. Employment and coordination of field artillery:
          a. Third Army non-divisional artillery units, other than those attached to corps, will be allotted to corps or held under Third Army control as dictated by the situation. All artillery units to be attached to corps will be moved under army control from ports of debarkation to corps rear boundary of two points designated by army.
          b. Units retained under army control will be attached to the 33rd FA brigade or the _____FA Brigade. Those units will be moved under control of their respective Brigade Commanders from ports of debarkation to points designated by army.
          c. As field artillery units debark it is tentatively planned to attach to each corps, field artillery units in approximately the following ultimate quantities:
               1 – HQ and HQ Btry Corps Arty
               1 – FA Observation Bn
               4 – HQ and HQ Btry FA Group
               5 – FA Bn, 105 How
               2 – FA Bn, 4.5” Gun
               5 – FA Bn, 155 How
               3 – FA Bn, 155 Gun
               2 – FA Bn, 8” How
          d. Initially 8-inch gun battalions and 240-mm howitzer battalions will be retained under army control subject to assignment to corps as dictated by the situation.

     3. Liaison: Liaison will be established between Corps Artillery Commanders from right to left. Adjacent division artillery headquarters will similarly establish liaison from right to left.

     4. Special Radio Nets: a. Special army artillery radio net will be available for the dissemination of artillery intelligence and information obtained from Photo Interpretation Center. A Corps artillery radio net will be provided for the same purpose and, in addition, to fire Serenade.
      5. Massing of Fire: The procedure for massing of fires within a corps sector will be as prescribed in Third Army Operations Memorandum No. 1, subject, “Serenade”.
     6. High Performance Aircraft: High performance aircraft will be available for long-range adjustment of artillery fire upon request through air support channels.
     7. Maps: (See Engineer Plan, Annex No. 5)
     8. Gridded Oblique Photographs (Marton): Will be provided through the Army Photo Center.
     9. Photo Interpretation: A Third Army Photo Center will be established. (See G-2 plan, Annex No. 8) First phase interpretation may be disseminated over the army artillery radio net. Corps artillery will furnish an artillery liaison officer at the Photo Center to facilitate obtaining desired interpretation intelligence.
     10. Ammunition Supply: Basic load as prescribed will be carried by all units. (See Administrative Order No. 1, Third U.S. Army.
     11. Counter battery: Corps commanders are responsible for the organization of counter-battery measures on their fronts. The Army Commander will effect coordination among the corps.
     12. Survey: Army topographical engineers will establish or extend survey control as far forward as practicable and will advance their control as the action progresses. Survey elements of the corps topographical engineers and the observation battalions will be pushed forward in all situations to check available maps and photo maps and to disseminate information gained, to all artillery units.
     13. Antiaircraft, tank and tank destroyer units: use of antiaircraft gun battalions, tank battalions and tank destroyer units to reinforce the fires of artillery units will be ordered only when it does not interfere with their primary missions. When this support is ordered, the senior artillery commander will coordinate such fires and assist in furnishing data for firing.
     14. Reports: a daily counter battery report, closing as of 1800, covering the following, will be required from each corps artillery and each FA brigade.
          a. Enemy artillery activities.
          b. Enemy dispositions.
          c. Counter battery missions fired.
          d. Additions to last complete hostile battery list.
          e. Deletions form last complete hostile battery list.
          f. General

Wednesday – 10th May 19446
          Engineer Map Plan

     1. General

          a. Initially it is anticipated that large topographic and photomaps at scale 1/25,000 will be available over the Northern coastal regions of France to a depth of 100 miles, and topographic maps, scale, 1/50,000 to a depth of 175 miles.  The 1/100,000 series will be available over the entire area of France.  The 1/250,000 scale over France and extending into Central Germany while similar scale maps extend still further.  A general evaluation of maps series can be obtained from GSGS publication notes on GSGS maps of France, Belgium and Holland.

          b. Tactical Maps

               (1) 1/250,000 (Air) GSGA 3982 (Same as 1/500,000).

               (2) 1/250,000 GSGA 2738, 4042, 4346 (General Issue).

               (3) 1/100,000 GSGS 4336, 4349,4416 (Principally for Armored Forces and Airborn Units).

               (4) 1/50,000 GSGS 4250 (General Issue).

               (5) 1/25,000 GSGS 4347, 4365, 4041 (Special use by Artillery, Infantry, Engineer and Headquarters).

          c. Road Maps

1/200,000 GSGS 4238 (General Use)

          d. Town Plans

               (1) Selected town GSGS 4234 (Limited special issue).

               (2) Through town plans, France – volumes 1-6 (Distribution governed by availability).

          f. Gazeteers 1/250,000 (France, Belgium and Holland) (Limited special issue).

          g. Trig data sheets: (Limited to Army and Corps Engineers and Artillery Observation Battalions).

     11. Control7

          a. Trig lists will be allocated to Army Engineers for topographic and Artillery troops by the Engineer FUSAG.  Efforts will be made to secure data for adjusted control for units concerned.

          b. Grid system:  Normally the British grid system will be used.  Tables will be furnished for conversion of geographic positions to grid positions for each zone and will be available to Army and Corps Engineers, Army and topographic units, and Artillery Observation Battalions.

Dear Folks,

     Guess you thought we had pulled out, but no such luck. We are going to be here a little longer. Everyone is on edge from sitting around and waiting.

     There has been little or no slack in the work we have had to do – it seems as if there aren’t enough hours per day to do our work.

     It sure seems funny not to see you or to know you are around, I sure did enjoy seeing you two every minute and hope you had as much fun as I did.

     Our last party at Oakdale left me limp for three days. I could hardly wait till time to go to bed. It sure was fun and everyone said they really enjoyed it and wanted me to thank you for a swell time. Our parting was certainly an unusual one, but the best kind – no one had time to be sad – it’s over before you know it.

     Since you left, I have stayed at the Inn several nights. It cast $4.00 for a cab and after 0100 hours the bus line doesn’t operate – it’s cheaper to get a room and hitch a ride out with Duker or Torres. Wink and I spent the weekend there – I went to the church just up the hill past the stoplight Sunday and the service was lively. Far superior to the one downtown. It was a little like our own in G.E. I’m going again next Sunday, I think. The last two days were spent in the carbine & pistol range. The sun was terrible, and I came in as red as a beet and with a killer headache – the sad thing was that our water didn’t arrive until 1600 hours.

     Saturday we are having our Battalion Officers party at the Club. It’s to be our final fling. On Monday we are having a big party for all of the men at the lake and casino you pass on the way to Coyne’s. It ought to be loads of fun for all of them. I’ve been given a real job – entertaining officers – responsible for getting the Bn. off and on the train. It’s a scientific job – got to be done just so!

     I got the caps from Field’s and they fit just fine.

     I’m so glad you and Dad had a nice trip home and I’ll bet it was a real thrill to see the two boys again. Did they change much? Know Peg was glad to see you. She probably needs a rest now!!

     When you two left here you sure looked like you were the idle rich who spent their time in Florida. You sure were brown – bet you’re the envy of one and all. Al said that Arbie had gotten a real nice letter from you. Also Cap’t Coyne got your address to send to Mrs. C. Have you written to her yet? Jane said that she wanted to send you a picture. She was so relieved when I told her that you and Dad both liked her. She said that it was easier that way cause you would have to get used to her – in the long run. She is real swell. Do you really like her? You said you liked Betsy too, remember?

     Her folks got home Sunday – made it in one day. They were both sorry not to have seen you, but – sooner or later you can make it.

     Would you like Jane to come up for a visit someday? Let me know how that strikes you.

     You probably will get a package from me someday with some extra cloths in it. You can do anything you want with them.

     Have got to close now – will drop you a line in a few days. All are well and happy and send their best regards.
                                                          Much love to all
                                                                       Tom.

Dear Folks,

     Hot as he!! Everyone is panting and dripping wet – the scene is hot enough to curl a camel’s tail.

     Our Battalion party is coming off in a few hours, so we are all taking it kind of easy.

     It sure was good to hear your voice the other day – glad to hear you all are feeling so good. I know the garden must look real good, and that you are having fun with your flowers.

     Capt. Torres and I are going over to the Q.M. in a minute to – and it struck me that I have very little dough. My combat pants, jacket & boots – coupled with taxi fares and hotel bills has made a dent. Could you have pop send me $50.00 from my U.S. Checks? Hate to ask for it, but I need it.

      Jane and everyone sends there love,
                                                              Love to all,
                                                                        Tom.

Dear Folks,

     Someone said it was 92 degrees yesterday but I believe it was 192. We had Service practice and as usual were on the bald hill with only the sun to see us. It was a good day – we borrowed 4 105’s and 400 rds. of ammo and shot all day.

     I got to do one from the plane. My first one and it was pretty good – I had a mission of smoking a hill so that our infantry could attack. This morning I had to register on a Base point as a forward observer would. We had a break – we were in the shade. Two generals were there – I guess all was ok ’cause they didn’t have much to say.

     The party was fun – everyone enjoyed themselves very much. Jane was so happy that you liked her so much – all she said for 5 min. was “golly” she was real cute.

     Got to run – must supervise a class.
                                                          Much love
                                                                       Tom,
Did you send the $50.00?

Saturday – 20th May 19448

          Air OP bulletins were initiated with the publication of Air OP Bulletin Number 1, 20 May.  (The term “Air OP” is used herein to designate field artillery liaison-type aircraft.)

     Ammunition base loads of types of ammunition and fuzes for each caliber weapon were determined, as follows:

Weapon       Projectile                Fuze                 Prpelling Charge

155mm         85% HE                 10% M67A1     

                  15% Smoke (WP)     70% M51A1

                                              30% M55A1

        The Captain Joseph T. Lyons family – Joseph Jr., born 9th February 1944, Esther and Joseph Sr. Photo was taken at a studio in Augusta Georgia prior to the 244th shipping out.

Dear Folks,

     Got your letter yesterday and I’m glad to hear that it is rather cool. It has been rotten up to this time, but right now it’s cloudy and cool.

     The Battalion is off on a service practice and I am left here as OD. A good deal, cause it gives me a chance to lie around.

     Frank Manger is getting married Sunday – Bob is Best Man and some of us are ushers. It’s to be held in town at a Methodist Church.

     Have you been able to sell the car yet? Sure do miss it down here. We, as yet, don’t know when D-day is. All of us hope it comes soon because sitting around is a real bore.

     Haven’t taken any pictures yet – I’ll do it through – never fear. Wink. Capt. Coyen & I took Jane out the other night. Had a lot of fun in the Bamboo Room at the Inn. It’s the only cool place in town.

     Mrs. Galway, Garland & Perfetti have all returned – the Inn is 2/3 244th people. I complete the deal when I stay there.

     Everyone is well here – my best to all. Jane sends her love.
                                                             Much love
                                                                       Tom.

Thursday – 25th May 1944
          Ordinance Plan

          XII – Expected Life of Artillery Tubes, Equilibrators, Gas Check Pads.  (To be published at a latter date)
     7. Method of Issue.
     (4) Combat Loading:
          (b) All weapons delivered to units in combat must be complete with all accessories.  Special attention will be given to artillery pieces to insure all “must items” and fire control are present.
     (13) Artillery Tubes: Ordnance units supporting artillery will report when 75% of the life of a tube has been shot away.  Appendix XII will be referred to for the expected file of a tube.  The report will be forwarded to the Army Ordnance Officer for action.9
          Ordnance Plan
               Section VIII – Captured Ordnance Material
          26. Captured Enemy Ordnance Materiel.  Corps and Division Commanders are responsible that all captured enemy Ordnance materiel, other than ammunition, is turned in to the nearest ordnance maintenance or depot company which will apply temporary preservative measures and will evacuate the materiel through ordnance channels to ordnance battalions.  All commanders will exercise the closest supervision to prevent collecting of souvenirs at the expense of possible future use by ourselves or our allies.  Care will be taken that captured materiel is not damaged in any manner or stripped of any part or accessories, with special attention being paid to preserving complete all optical instruments, sighting and fire control equipment, etc.

          27. Location. When captured enemy materiel cannot be moved to areas under ordnance supervision, the Army Ordnance Officer will be notified promptly of the location by coordinates and position relative to towns, roads or other landmarks, together with a brief description of types and quantities of material at that point.

          28. Ammunition. Captured enemy ammunition, except toxic chemicals, found in original containers showing no evidence of tampering, artillery projectiles, and powder, will be evacuated through ammunition companies to specified, enemy ammunition, dumps.  All loose small arms ammunition, grenades, mines, ect., except toxic chemicals, will be destroyed in place under supervision of qualified ordnance personnel or engineer personnel.  Toxic chemical ammunition will not be handled by ordnance personnel but will be turned over to CWS.  Personnel not especially trained will not move, disturb, fire or discharge, loose and scattered enemy materials.

Section IX Miscellaneous
          36. Preparation of Artillery and Small Arms for Salt Water Voyage
   a. Unit commanders are responsible for the proper protection against salt water and spray of all small arms and artillery under their control.
   b. All parts of artillery ad small arms will be coated with oil, lubrication, preservative, medium, as prescribed in the appropriate Field Manuals with the exceptions listed in paragraph c. below. Preservative will be completely removed as quickly as practicably after landing in order that excessive dirt and dust will not accumulate and result in serious damage and stoppage.

Thursday – 25th May 194410
          Ordinance Plan

Appendix XII To Annex 14 Of Third U.S. Army Outline Plan Operation Ordnance Plan, Expected Life of Artillery Tubes, Equilibrators, Gas Check Pads.
7. Method of Issue.
       (4) Combat Loading:
                    (b) All weapons delivered to units in combat must be complete with all accessories.  Special attention will be given to artillery pieces to insure all “must items” and fire control are present.11

       (13) Artillery Tubes: Ordnance units supporting artillery will report when 75% of the life of a tube has been shot away.  Appendix XII will be referred to for the expected file of a tube.  The report will be forwarded to the Army Ordnance Officer for action.12

Section VIII – Captured Ordnance Material13
       26. Captured Enemy Ordnance Materiel. Corps and Division Commanders are responsible that all captured enemy Ordnance materiel, other than ammunition, is turned in to the nearest ordnance maintenance or depot company which will apply temporary preservative measures and will evacuate the materiel through ordnance channels to ordnance battalions. All commanders will exercise the closest supervision to prevent collecting of souvenirs at the expense of possible future use by ourselves or our allies.  Care will be taken that captured materiel is not damaged in any manner or stripped of any part or accessories, with special attention being paid to preserving complete all optical instruments, sighting and fire control equipment, etc.

       27. Location. When captured enemy materiel cannot be moved to areas under ordnance supervision, the Army Ordnance Officer will be notified promptly of the location by coordinates and position relative to towns, roads or other landmarks, together with a brief description of types and quantities of material at that point.

        28. Ammunition. Captured enemy ammunition, except toxic chemicals, found in original containers showing no evidence of tampering, artillery projectiles, and powder, will be evacuated through ammunition companies to specified, enemy ammunition, dumps. All loose small arms ammunition, grenades, mines, etc, except toxic chemicals, will be destroyed in place under supervision of qualified ordnance personnel or engineer personnel. Toxic chemical ammunition will not be handled by ordnance personnel, but will be turned over to CWS.  Personnel not especially trained will not move, disturb, fire or discharged, loose and scattered enemy materials.

Saturday – 27th May 194414 

     (9)Signal Intelligence and Monitoring Company (SIAM) Signal Intelligence and Monitoring service will be provided by such means as are available to the Third U.S. Army.  The troops so employed will be under the direction of the A.C. of S. G-2 and A.C. of S. G-3, Third U.S. Army, under the supervision of  the Army Signal Officer. b. Corps Signal Units

     (3) XX Corps

          (a) Radio silence will be in effect prior to arrival on the continent, during debarkation, and until arrival into initial assembly area.  Until this silence is lifted, the XX Corps situation will tune its receiver to frequency of Net No. A-1 and monitor traffic thereon.  It may be required to operate on this net for a period.  Upon receipt of instructions for the lifting of radio silence from this headquarters, either over Net No. A-1, or by some other means, the XX Corps radio station will report in on Net No. A-2.

          (b) In the event of an amphibious operation by XX Corps, Net No. A-2 will consist of the following stations:  Third U.S. Army Net Control Station, fixed radio station at Plymouth and XX Corps (Headquarters ship and/or Mobile Station).  Prior to the lifting of radio silence, the fixed station at Plymouth and/or the Third U.S. Army Net Control Station may operate on this net on a “FOX” schedule.  When the necessary radio silence for the XX Corps, incident to an amphibious operation, is lifted by the Commanding General, XX Corps, XX Corps stations will report into this net.

     (4) XII Corps

          (a) Radio silence will be maintained prior to arrival on the continent, during debarkation, and until lifted by Third U.S. Army after XII Corps reaches its assembly area.  The lifting of radio silence may be directed by this headquarters either by a message to XII Corps over Net No. A-2, or by some other means.

          (b)  XII corps will arrange to monitor Nets No. A-1 and A-2 continuously form the opening of operations until silence is lifted, as stated above.

Radio Communications15

     (4) Miscellaneous radio and other communications

          (a) Numbering of Radio Channel

The following numbering system will be used,

          FUSAG                                      FG (i.e., FG-1, FG-2, ect.)

          COM Z                                      FZ (i.e., FZ-1, FZ-2, ect.)

          Army                               A1 – A19

          XV Corps                         C20 – C39

          XX Corps                         C40 – C59

          VIII Corps                       C60 – C79

          XII Corps                        C80 – C99

          Division                          D (Actual assignment of

          Brigade                           B Numbers by major unit

          Group or Regt                   G assigning frequencies

          (Battalion or Squadron        S and code signs).

          Lateral will be shown as follows:

                       15 Div __14/D7__ 14 Div

               (a) Army Radio Nets (See Appendix II).

               (c) Lateral Radio Communication

         (k) Tank Attack Warning Net

                    (1) Information of impending or actual Armored attack will be broadcast directly over the special Army and Corps Artillery (SCR-193) Radio Net.

                    (2) This information will be transmitted by voice.  Each warning will be repeated three times.  Warning messages will be modified “Flash Fox” type messages.  For “Fox” type messages, see Par.2, Signal Circular No. 42-1.  Prearranged Code.  These messages will be transmitted in the clear.

Essential elements of the broadcast will be:

               (a) Number of tanks.

               (b) Identification (type of tanks).

               (c)  Location of tanks expressed in grid coordinates
                     (clear).

               (d) Direction of movement.

               (e) Speed of movement.

               (f) Time reported.

                    (3) Upon completion of the transmission, only the following stations will receipt in the order listed below:

Division Artillery Headquarters (from right to left)

F. A. Brigade Headquarters

T. D. Brigade or Group Headquarters

               (a) Using other means of communication, each of the above headquarters will assure themselves that their subordinate units have received the messages.

               (b) It is the responsibility of Corps Artillery Headquarters, Division Artillery Headquarters and direct support Artillery Battalions to transmit the message by fastest practicable means to Corps Headquarters, Division and Infantry Regimental Headquarters, respectively.

               (c) A Corps Artillery Headquarters receiving such a flash warning message will transmit it on the Army Artillery Net to the Army Artillery Officer for transmission to the Army Commander.

  1. Third U.S. Army Outline Plan – Operation Overlord, Annex No. 13-G-4, Page 91
  2. Third U. S. Army Special Annex A - Outline Plan To Operation Overlord Annex No. 3 – Troop Priority List
  3. Special Annex A - Third U.S. Army Outline Plan To Operation Overlord Annex No. 13 - G-4 Plan Page 84, 85
  4. Third U.S. Army Outline Plan – Operation Overlord, Annex No. 8, G - 2 Plan, Page 64
  5. Special Annex A - Third U.S. Army Outline Plan To Operation Overlord Annex No. 12 – Artillery Plan Page 74
  6. Special Annex A - Third U.S. Army Outline Plan To Operation Overlord Annex No. 5 – Engineer Plan, Page 40
  7. Special Annex A - Third U.S. Army Outline Plan To Operation Overlord Annex No. 5 – Engineer Plan Page 41
  8. Third US Army After Action Report – Volume II, Part 9 Artillery, Page 2
  9. Special Annex A - Third U.S. Army Outline Plan To Operation Overlord Annex No. 14 – Ordnance Plan Page 96
  10. Third U.S. Army Outline Plan – Operation Overlord, Annex No. 14–Ordinance Plan, Page 95, 96, 97
  11. Third U.S. Army Outline Plan – Operation Overlord, Annex No. 14 – Ordnance Plan, Page 96, 95
  12. Third U.S. Army Outline Plan – Operation Overlord, Annex No. 14 – Ordnance Plan, Page 96, 97
  13. Third U.S. Army Outline Plan – Operation Overlord, Annex No. 14 – Ordnance Plan Page 97
  14. Special Annex A - Third U.S. Army Outline Plan To Operation Overlord Annex No. 4 – Signal Plan Page 20
  15. Special Annex A - Third U.S. Army Outline Plan To Operation Overlord Annex No. 4 – Signal Plan Page 21