244th Field Artillery Battalion

April 1945

Sunday – 1st April 19451

          Rapid advances of the 4th and 11th Armored Divisions of XII Corps had been the outstanding characteristics of March operations.  As April began both of these divisions continued their attacks against disorganized resistance.  The 4th Armored Division was twenty miles northeast of Hersfeld (H35) at the beginning of the period, and Combat Command “A” and “B” advanced from that vicinity to Horschel (H77) and Spighra (H77), while Reserve Combat Command and the attached 359th Infantry (90th Infantry Division) remained near Hersfeld (H35).  Northeast of Fulda (H31) all three combat commands of the 11th Armored Division gained up to twenty-five miles, with forward elements reaching the Werra River at (H8725).  Meanwhile, the 90th Infantry Division (-) and the 26th Infantry Division were mopping up behind the 4th and 11th Armored Division spearheads, respectively.  The south flank was screened by the 2nd Cavalry Group which actually was operating south of the Third- Seventh U.S. Army boundary.  Far to the rear, the 71st Infantry Division mopped up small enemy straggler groups in the area Budingen (M98) – Windecken (M88) – Staden (M89).

     As the tactical troops continued their rapid advances, the policy of establishing small ammunition supply points and leapfrogging these installations remained in force.  The lack of adequate rail facilities was an important factor in dictating the current system of ammunition supply.

     A captured German toxic gas dump at Hundstadt (M59) was found to contain approximately 55,000 shells, of which an estimated 45,000 were filled with a chemical warfare gas believed to be either Adamsite or Diphenylchlorarsine.

     Note on the above After Action report – Adamsite and Diphenylchlorarsine

Adamsite – 

DESCRIPTION: Adamsite (DM) is a vomiting compound that has been used as a riot-control agent (military designation, DM). It is released as an aerosol. Adverse health effects due to exposure to adamsite (DM) are generally self-limited and do not require specific therapy. Most adverse health effects resolve within 30 minutes. Exposure to large concentrations of adamsite (DM), or exposure to adamsite (DM) within an enclosed space or under adverse weather conditions, may result in more severe adverse health effects, serious illness, or death.

APPEARANCE: Light green to yellow crystals (solid) at room temperature. When dispersed by heat, fine particulate smoke; canary yellow when concentrated, colorless when diluted with air.

Diphenylchloroarsine –
A colorless crystalline arsenical (C6H5)2AsCl used during World War I especially by the Germans for producing a toxic smoke causing sneezing and vomiting.
Sunday – 1st April 19452

          The Battalion was in position in vicinity of Burg-Bracht, Germany (wN08289755) attached to 410th Field Artillery Group in general support of the 11th Armored and the 26th Infantry Divisions.

     Battery “C” placed on special duty as Security Guards and attached to 9th Tank Destroyer Group.  Battery “C” moved to vicinity of Langerdiebach, Germany (wM8875) and prepared to turn in guns, tractors, fire control equipment to 520th Ordnance Battalion.

     Battalion moved to new positions in vicinity of Hauswarz, Germany (wH2308) with no change in attachment but with mission of supporting the 121st Cavalry Squadron and the 26th Infantry Division on the Corps right flank.  The 771st Field Artillery Battalion (155 mm Howitzer) attached for fire direction.

          Safe Conduct Pass

Sunday – 1st April 19453

     0830 – Battery “C” placed on Detached Service with 9th T.D. Group.  Primary Mission:
               Security Guards.  Guns and Tractors turned in to 520th Ordnance Company at
               Langeniebach, Germany.

     0930 – Battalion Commander held Battery Commander’s Meeting and briefed them on
               contemplated move.

     1000 – Battalion Commander, with Battery Commanders and their Advanced Parties left on
               reconnaissance for new position in vicinity of Hauswurs, Germany.

     1115 – Battalion left Niedargrundau for new position at
              Hauswurs, Germany.

     1615 – Battalion closed in new position at Hauswurs, Germany.

     1630 – Colonel Day, 410th Field Artillery Group Commander, at Battalion C.P. for
               conference with Battalion Commander.

     1645 – Colonel Day left Battalion C.P. (wH235085); Battery “A” at (wH2469509560):
               Battery “B” at (wH2468009262).

     1700 – 771st Field Artillery Battalion (155mm Howitzer) attached to Battalion for
               administration and fire direction.

     2000 – Battalion Commander left for Service Battalion and to check on arrival of 771st
               Field Artillery Battalion.

     2130 – Battalion Commander returned to Battalion C.P.

     0001 – 2400 – Fired two concentrations on tanks in towns of Ruckars 
                         and Hutte.  Fires started in both towns. 
                         Batteries “A” & “B” registered by Air OP.

          L to R TEC/5 John Gaskin, 1st. Lt. Max Garland air OP’s, Unknown

Sunday – 1st April 19454

          The Battalion departed Burg-Bracht.

Sunday – 1st April 19455

          The Battalion arrived Hauswurz.  Lt. Rosen, B Battery killed by a sniper while on patrol.

Sunday – 1st April 19456

          Hauswurz (Germany) cut off for 2 days

Sunday – 1st April 19457

          The woods were full of Krauts and our daily patrols brought in large numbers of prisoners. Service Battery, up front as usual brought in their share. One officer was killed in this Infantry operation.

     By now we were doing very little artillery firing and “C” Battery was detached to act as Security Guards for a small part of the vast area we had helped to secure.

Colonel Davis Paper8

          Well, we continued the war very rapidly and found ourselves more than once over on the flank of the Third Army.  We had to get into and capture the small villages and get the German prisoners out of them and out of the woods that were surrounding them.  Our battalion often found itself alone; the Armor had gone on, and there we were on the flank of the army until the Seventh Army, or one of the others would come up to us.  So, we were very much in the war capturing business at that time.  We were moving fast and going through a lot of German towns. That was on the right flank of the Third Army, and the Seventh Army forward elements were corning up on the right.  That’s where we lost one of our officers – – in one of those clean-up areas, going through the woods, he was shot.

Sunday – 1st April 1945 HQ & Hq Battery Morning Report9

                            Hauswurz, Germany wH2308
        Departed Burg-Bracht, Germany wN0897 via
        Motor Convoy at 1000. Arrived present Sta
        1550.  Distance marched approximately 15 miles.
                    No limited assignment personnel

Sunday – 1st April 1945 Battery “A” Morning Report10

                              Hauswurz, Germany wH2308
                    ______, Paul                           34 339 701     Tec/5    MOS 014      Code 11-9
                              Aptd S/Sgt par 3, SO #19 Hq 244th FA Bn
                              MOS changed to 813
                    Bennett, John B.                       34 249 729     Pfc.      MOS 531      Code 11-9
                              Aptd Cpl par 3, SO #19, Hq 244th FA Bn.
                              MOS changed to 603
                    Ratcliff, Donald W.                    39 693 452     Pfc.                        Code 11-9
                    Taylor, Raymond A.                   37 393 248     Pfc.                        Code 11-9
                              Above 2 EM aptd Tec. 5 par 3, SO #19,
                              Hq 244th FA Bn
                    Barton, Harlan W.                     39 693 341      Pvt.                       Code 11-9
                    Broxton, Burke S.                     34 829 285      Pvt.                       Code 11-9
                    Cembrola, Nick J.                      42 048 009      Pvt.                       Code 11-9
                    Fritz, Willard C.                        33 378 907      Pvt.                       Code 11-9
                    King, Bernard B.                       34 248 724      Pvt.                       Code 11-9
                    McCollister, Wilbur W.               35 585 421      Pvt.                        Code 11
                    Parker, Harlan D.                      39 478 824      Pvt.                       Code 11-9
                    Parrish, Donald G., Jr.               12 101 856      Pvt.                        Code 11
                              Above EM (8) aptd Pfc per SO #10, this Btry
           Departed Burg-Bracht, Germany wN0897 at 1015
           via Motor Convoy. Arrived present Sta 1530 Distance
           marched approximately 17 miles
                     2 EM Limited Assignment Personnel

Sunday – 1st April 1945 Battery “C” Morning Report11

                              Langendiebach Germany 1 mi wM8675
                    Riemenschneider, Albert F.             33 922 350     Pvt.    MOS 531       Code J4A
                              Sk LD 5th Clearing Co to lost to Evac
                              Hosp (Unknown) “Non-battle loss” (Disease)
                              “Dy 531” 25 Mar 45
          Organization became Non-operational as FA
          and atchd to 9th TD Gp for adminstration
          and dy as Security Guard per VOCG XII
          Corps.
          Departed Bos Gesab, Germany via motor
          convoy at 0900 arr present Sta at 1500
          distance marched approximately 31 miles.
                    One EM Limited Assignment Personnel

Sunday – 1st April 1945 Service Battery Morning Report12

                              Weidenau, Germany wH2207
          Departed Burg-Bracht, Germany wN0897 via
          Motor Convoy at 0815. Arr present station
          1530 distance marched approximately 16
          miles
                    No limited assignment personnel

Monday – 2nd April 194513

          An operational directive issued to the Commanding Generals, VIII, XII and XX Corps stated in part:

     VIII Corps (76th, 87th and 89th Infantry Divisions, 4th Armored Division and attached troops) was to assume command of the 4th Armored Division in place on Army order, was to coordinate with XX Corps on the move through its zone to the new VIII Corps zone, and was to advance east in the direction Sontra (H57)—Langensalza (J08).

     XII Corps (26th, 71st and 90th Infantry Divisions, 11th Armored Division and attached troops) was to pass control of the 4th Armored Division to VIII Corps on Army order, was to continue to advance east in its zone, and was to protect the right (south) flank of Third U.S. Army.

     XX Corps (65th and 80th Infantry Divisions, 6th Armored Division and attached troops) was to continue to advance east in its zone and was to protect the left (north) flank of Third U.S. Array.  The 5th Infantry Division was to continue its mission in the Frankfurt (M67) area and the woods northeast of the city, after which it was to revert to Army control for movement to the vicinity of Giessen (G62).

     The 13th Armored Division closed in the vicinity of Oberstein (L72), while the 70th Infantry Division remained in the vicinity of Bad Kreuznach (M03).  Both divisions assumed policing duties.

     All organized resistance in VIII Corps zone was destroyed by the 76th, 87th and 89th Infantry Divisions and the 6th Cavalry Group.  The 76th and 89th Infantry Divisions moved to areas south of Homberg (H17), while the 6th Cavalry Group moved near Muhlbach (H26), passing to temporary operational control of XX Corps.

     A bridgehead across the Werra River near Creuzberg (H77) in XII Corps zone was established by the 4th Armored Division, after which Combat Command “A” advanced east to Streoda (H87) while Combat Command “B” reached Goldbach (J07).  Another bridgehead was established farther south when Combat Command “A” (11th Armored Division) captured a bridge intact near Ritschenhausen (H91) from which point it advanced fifteen miles to the east. Meanwhile, Combat Command “B” (11th Armored Division) closed to the west bank of the Werra River.  Continuing its advance to the northeast, the 90th Infantry Division (less 359th Infantry) gained ten miles, while mopping up in the rear of 4th Armored Division, Fulda (H31) was cleared by the 26th Infantry Division, which continued to follow the 11th Armored Division.  To the rear, the 71st Infantry Division continued its mopping up operations, while the 2nd Cavalry Group, still south of the Third – Seventh U.S. Army boundary, continued to screen the corps south flank.  The 16th Cavalry Group, in assembly, prepared to move to Fifteenth U.S. Army zone west of the Rhine River.

Monday 2nd April 194514

     0750 – Wire communication established with 410th Field Artillery Group.

     1100 – Battalion Commander left for 410th F.A. Group.

     1120 – Battalion Exec left for 102nd Field Artillery Group.

     1315 – Battalion Exec returned to Battalion C.P.

     1330 – Battalion Commander, 771st F.A. Battalion, visited Colonel Davis at Battalion FDC                     for conference.

     1350 – Lt. Colonel Schmucher, 771st F.A. Battalion left Battalion C.P

     1450 – XII Corps Artillery Commander, Brigadier General Lents, visited Battalion FDC.

     1505 – General Lents left Battalion FDC.

     0001 – 2400 – No missions fired by Battalion.

Monday – 2nd April 1945 HQ & Hq Battery Morning Report15

                              Bauswurz, Germany wN2506
                    Joachim, Robert S.                    12 235 179    Pvt.
                              Dy to Sk Ld in 114th Clearing Co. Non-
                              battle casualty burn 2nd degree rt. hand.
                    No limited assignment personnel

Tuesday – 3rd April 194516

          An adjustment of the inter-corps boundaries gave VIII Corps the central part of Army zone, with XX Corps on the north and XII Corps on the south.  The 87th Infantry Division moved northeast, going into an assembly area near Friedeatald (H45).  Passing to VIII Corps control were the 4th Armored Division, 65th Infantry Division and 6th Cavalry Group.  The 4th Armored Division continued to advance eastward, with Combat Command “B” fighting in Gotha (J06) and Combat Command “A” reaching the vicinity of Ohrdruf (J15).  Attached to the 4th Armored Division, the 355th Infantry (89th Infantry Division) moved to the vicinity of Gotha (J06) to join the division.  Eisenach (H76) was being attacked through the period by the 353rd Infantry (89th Infantry Division), while the 354th Infantry moved to its new zone.  The northern flank was protected by the 65th Infantry Division which attacked to the east, while in the rear the 6th Cavalry Group continued to clear the area west of the Fulda River.

     Spearheading the advance of XII Corps’ the 11th Armored Division continued its rapid advance to the east.  Suhl (J02) was captured by Combat Command “A”, while Combat Command “B” reached Oberhof (J13).  While following the 11th Armored Division, the 26th Infantry Division gained fifteen miles, mopping up enemy pockets and clearing Setzelbach (H53).  When the new inter-corps boundaries went into effect, the 90th Infantry Division was inside VIII Corps zone in the rear of the 4th Armored Division.  It attacked southeast to move back into XII Corps zone, gaining fifteen miles and taking Schenkfeld (H44), Vacha (H65) and Berka (H66).  The 359th Infantry (90th Infantry Division) reverted to divisional control from attachment to the 4th Armored Division.  The 71st Infantry Division mopped up woods twenty miles south of Lauterbach (H12), beginning movement late in the period to assume positions on the corps right (south) flank between Schluctern (N29) and Fulda (H31).  The 2nd Cavalry Group continued to screen the corps south flank, while the 16th Cavalry Group cleared Army zone enroute to Fifteenth U.S. Army.

     Plans were made for the trans-shipment of supplies, particularly packaged Class III, from rail at Bingen (M15) by truck across the Rhine River, using a floating Bailey bridge near Rudesheba (M15) and movement forward by rail to Army rail-heads in the Hersfeld (H35) —Kassel (C20) area.  However, this method of transportation was not put into effect because of the early completion of the gasoline pipeline across the Rhine River and continued receipt of Class III Supplies by air lift.  On this date 106,808 gallons of gasoline were received at airfields at Gelnhausen (N07), Lich (G71) and Nidda (G90), as well as 263,445 operational-type rations.

     Forward Echelon, Headquarters, Third U.S. Army, moved to Frankfurt On Main (M67), a distance of eighty-five miles from Idar-Oberstein (L72).

Tuesday – 3rd April 194517

     1510 – Message received from 410th F.A. Group to cease fire on Ruckers and Keulzelbush.

     1535 – Orders received from 410th F.A. Group to cease all H & I missions.  771st F.A.
               Battalion notified.

     1535 – 23 Germans captured by patrols sent into woods near gun positions.

     0001 – 2400 – Four H & I missions fired on town of Nieder Kolbach, Obr Kolbach,
                         Grundheim and Urichshausen.

Tuesday – 3rd April 1945 HQ & Hq Battery Morning Report18

                              Hauswurz, Germany wH2308
                    Joachim, Robert S.                    12 235 179    Pvt.     MOS 641      Code J4A
                              Sk LD 114th Clearing Co to lost to Hosp
                              unknown. Non-battle casualty burn 2nd
                              degree rt. hand. Dy 641

Wednesday – 4th April 194519

          Gains of ten miles were made by all three combat commands of the 11th Armored Division, which were spearheading the XII Corps attack. Oberhof (J13) and Zella Mehlis (J03) were taken, while Reserve Combat Command drove close to Meiningen (H82). The 101st and 328th Infantry Regiments (26th Infantry Division) followed the armor closely in a twenty mile advance, mopping up by-passed troops.  The 90th Infantry Division continued to advance south and southeast out of VIII Corps zone, clearing Eckartshausen (H76), Mohra (H75), Allendorf (H74) and Barchfeld (H84).  South flank patrolling was continued throughout the period by the 2nd Cavalry Group, which relieved the 104th Infantry (26th Infantry Division).  Upon being relieved, the 104th Infantry moved to the northeast.  The 71st Infantry Division completed mopping up enemy in its zone, then moved north to assume positions along the line Schluctern (N29) – Fulda (H31).

Wednesday – 4th April 194520

          The 771st Field Artillery Battalion relieved of attachment to the 244th Field Artillery Battalion.

Wednesday – 4th April 194521

     0915 – Battalion Commander left to inspect “A” & “B” Batteries.

     1030 – Battalion Commander returned to Battalion CP.

     1500 – Battalion Exec returned to Battalion from I & E School at Paris.

     1815 – Battalion Exec left Battalion CP for Rear Echelon.

     1920 – Battalion Exec returned to Battalion CP.

     0001 – 2400 – 1 registration completed.  15 Germans captured by Battalion.

Wednesday – 4th April 1945 HQ & Hq Battery Morning Report22

                              Hauswurz, Germany wH2308
                    Clark, Carey A. (FA)                  0 249 134     Maj.
                              Temporary dy Cite Universitaire, Paris,
                              France to dy
                    Duker, John E. Jr. (FA)               0 313 275    Capt.
                              Temporary dy UK to dy
                    Hendry, France (FA)                  01 176 997    2nd Lt.                       Code A1
                              Asgd & jd fr Btry C this Bn par 1, SO #20,
                              Hq 244th FA Bn
                    No limited assignment personnel

4th April 1945 Battery “C” Morning Report23

                              Langendiebach Germany 1 mi W wM8675
                    Hendry, Ernest FA                     01 176 997    2nd Lt.
                              Reld from asgmt and trfd to Hq & Hq Btry
                              his Bn per par 1, SO #20 hq 244th FA Bn
                              departed
                    Coony, Edward P. (FA)               01 556 728     2nd Lt
                              Princ dy changed from Asst Recn 0 1183 to
                              Princ dy Recon 0 1183

          Concentration Camp Ohrdruf Germany

          Concentration Camp Ohrdruf Germany

Note on the above three photos – Patton wanted as many units as possible to visit and view concentration camps.  The Ohrdruf camp was approximately 100 miles NW of Hauswurz Germany.

Thursday – 5th April 194524

          XII Corps (26th, 71st and 90th Infantry Divisions, 11th Armored Division and supporting troops) was to consolidate along the general line Oberhof (J13) Meiningen (H82), pushing aggressive reconnaissance east and southeast of the line, on Army order was to advance southeast in its zone, and was to maintain contact with Seventh U.S. Army on the right (south).

     XII Corps’ attack to the east continued.  Only small advances were made by the 11th Armored Division which at this time was restrained from further advance by order.  This enabled the supporting infantry to close the gap between the infantry and the armor.  Meiningen (M92) was cleared by the 101st and 328th Infantry Regiments (26th Infantry Division) which gained up to fifteen miles.  Among the towns taken by the 90th Infantry Division were Bonndorf (H83), Metzels (H93), Schwarza (H92), Ebertshadsen (J02), Möckers (H83), Breitenbach (H93) and Ineiernau (H93). Meanwhile, the 104th Infantry (26th Infantry Division) screened the corps right (south) flank.  Positions along the Eisenach (H86) – Meiningen (H92) road were gained by the 90th Infantry Division after an advance of ten miles.  The 87th Infantry Division relieved the 90th Infantry Division, which began movement south to its proper zone.  The south flank was screened by the 2nd Cavalry Group, while the 5th and 14th Infantry Regiments (71st Infantry Division) moved north in search for bypassed enemy stragglers.

Thursday – 5th April 194525

     1315 – Battalion Commander left for Service Battery.

     1455 – Battalion Commander returned to Battalion CP.

     1525 – XII Corps Artillery Adjutant, Major Braly, visited Battalion Commander at
               Battalion FDC.

     1545 – Major Braly left Battalion FDC.

     1630 – 2nd Lt. Herman Rosen, Battery “B”, shot by German while on patrol.

     0001 – 2400 – No Missions fired by Battalion.

Thursday – 5th April 194526

           2nd Lieutenant Herman Rosen Battery B was shot and fatally wounded while on patrol clearing woods in front of his battery position.  He died in the hospital a few days later.

Thursday –5th April 1945 Battery “C” Morning Report27

                              Angersbach Germany wH2127
          Departed Langendiebach Germany 1 mi W via
          motor convoy at 0800 arr present Sta at
          distance marched approximately 60
          miles
                    One EM Limited Assignment Personnel

April 1945
          Local News Paper

Dear Folks,
     Another nice house, the lights are on, the water runs, and there is a real John!!  We haven’t really started our new job – but from all points it looks pretty good.  We have the job of guarding food stocks, R.R’s, Booze, displaced persons ect.  It’s an easy life for me and all, guess the war is about finished.  I’ve added Trier, Bad Kreuznach, Frankfurt, A.M. Hanau (all ruins) Cobling, Simmern, and a lot of other little spots.  We are all in the pink and have very little to report.  I have sent 23.00 home – you will get it in a month or so.  Please let me know.  Will write again.  Love to all Tom.

Friday – 6th April 194528

          Letter of Instructions Number Twenty, dated 4 April, was received from Twelfth U.S. Army Group, stating the missions of Twelfth U.S. Army Group and Third U.S. Army.

     Twelfth U.S. Army Group, in Phase One, was to mop up the Ruhr pocket, seize the line Meinigen (H82) – Gotha (J06) – Schlotheim (J09) – Duderstadt (C72) – Northeim (C54) – Einbeck (C46) – Alfeld (C47) – Diester Gebirge Hills and protect the right (south) flank of 21 Army Group British so as to insure its rapid advance to the Leine River, then regroup for strong offensive action to the east.  In Phase Two, Twelfth U.S. Army Group was to attack on order along the axis Kassel (C20) – Leipzig (E21) to gain contact with the Soviet forces.  It was to exploit any opportunity for seizing a bridgehead over the Elbe River and be prepared to continue the advance to the east of the river.

     Third U.S. Army, in Phase One, was to complete the capture of Kassel (C20) before turning it over to First U.S. Army, then was to seize the line Meiningen (H82) – Gotha (J06) – Langensalza (J08) and regroup for strong offensive action to the east.  In Phase Two, Third U.S.Army was to advance on order to the east in its zone, maintain contact with Sixth U.S. Army Group troops on the right (south) as far as Bayreuth (075), and be prepared to continue the advance to the east or southeast.

     The 5th Infantry Division remained in the vicinity of Lich (G71) and Frankfurt (M67), while Combat Commands “A” and “B” (13th Armored Division) closed in assembly area near Homberg (H17) and Reserve Combat Command continued movement to that vicinity.  West of the Rhine River, the 70th Infantry Division continued its policing.

     In XII Corps zone, the 90th Infantry Division completed its move south and then attacked swiftly to the east with the 359th Infantry, which relieved elements of the 11th Armored Division in the Oberhof (J13) – Zella Mehlis (J03) area.  The 357th and 358th Infantry Regiments, meanwhile, assembled in the rear.  Advances of up to ten miles were made by all Combat Commands of 11th Armored Division.  While Combat Commands “A” and “B” advanced south to vicinity of Themar (J01), Reserve Combat Command attacked southeast to Vachdqrf (H91) and reconnaissance elements entered Schleusingen (J11).  Mopping up behind 11th Armored Division, the 26th Infantry Division’s 101st Infantry was in the Suhl (J02) – Meiningen (H92) area, while the 328th Infantry occupied Schmalkalden (H94) and blocking positions on the Army south flank were assumed by the 104th Infantry (26th Infantry Division).  The 2nd Cavalry Group was attached to the 71st Infantry Division, at which time it went into assembly at Hof Bieber (H42).  In the 71st Infantry Division, the 5th and 66th Infantry Regiments assembled, while the 14th Infantry moved east to Unterweid (H62), assuming Army south flank protection in that vicinity.

Friday – 6th April 194529

          The Battalion moved to positions in the vicinity of Unterbernhards, Germany (wH5623) with mission of supporting the 42nd Cavalry Squadron, screening right Corps flank.

Friday – 6th April 194530

     0930 – Battalion commander left to inspect Battery “C’ now on detachment service with
               9th T.D.Battalion as security Guards.

     1000 – Close Station, March order given to Battalion.

     1005 – 771st F.A. Battalion relieve from attachment to Battalion and reverted back to
               182nd F.A. Group.

     1100 – Wire communications with firing batteries pulled.  Radio communication established.

     1200 – Battalion Exec accompanied by Battery Commanders left for 410th F.A. Group.

     1400 – Battalion left for new positions in vicinity of Unterbernhards, Germany

     1800 – Battalion arrived at Unterbernhards.  CP and FDC opened.  Coordinates of
               installations as follows:  CP at (wH567240); Battery “A” (wH563241); Battery “B”
               (wH5582480).  Primary mission of Battalion to support 42nd Cavalry.

     0001 – 2400 – No missions fired by Battalion

Friday – 6th April 194531

          On the 6th of April we began moving once more.  This time we took long jumps through Fuld a to Unterbernhards, then to Themar, where we waited outside the town while the 11th Armored Division assaulted and took it.  We then moved daily with the armored column through Rodach and Cosfeld near Coburgh.

Friday – 6th April 194532

          The Battalion departed Hauswurz Germany.

Friday – 6th April 194533

          Mahlerto – (Melkers Germany) 

Friday – 6th April 194534

          The Battalion arrived Unterbernhards Germany.

Friday – 6th April 1945 HQ & Hq Battery Morning Report35

                              Unterbernhards, Germany wH5623
          Departed Hauswurz, Germany wH2308 via
          Motor Convoy at 1330. Arrived present Sta
          1750.  Distance marched 32 mi.
                    No limited assignment personnel

Friday – 6th April 1945 Service Battery Morning Report36

                              Unterbenhards, Germany wX5624
          Departed Weidenau, Germany wH2207 via
          Motor Convoy at 1340. Arr present Sta
          1855.  Distance marched approximately
          38 miles.
                    No limited assignment personnel

Saturday – 7th April 194537

          XII Corps was deployed on the front with its 90th Infantry Division on the north, 26th Infantry Division in the center and 11th Armored Division in the south, while to the rear the 71st Infantry Division and 2nd Cavalry Group were mopping up and protecting the Army south flank.  After being relieved north of the XII – VIII Corps boundary, the 357th and 358th Infantry Regiments (90th Infantry Division) went into assembly area near Zella-Mehlis (J03) while the 359th Infantry gained six miles in an attack to the east.  The Nahe River was reached by the 101st Infantry (26th Infantry Division), while the 328th Infantry reached Schmiedefeld (J12) and Vesser (J12) and the 104th Infantry assembled near Kaltensundheim (H72).  Farther south, Combat Command “A” (11th Armored Division) cleared Hildburghausen (J10), Schleusingen (J11) and Themar (J01) in an eight mile advance.  Combat Command “B” and Reserve Combat Command assembled throughout the period.  To the rear, the 14th and 66th Infantry (71st Infantry Division) were in assembly, while the 104th Infantry and the attached 2nd Cavalry Group screened the Army south flank and ferreted out by-passed enemy.

     Third U.S. Army units regrouped during the period following changes in corps boundaries which necessitated the movement of units back to their proper corps zones.  The general advance to the east continued throughout the period.

     Easter services in Third U.S. Army’s zone of operations were conducted by chaplains in forests, fields, houses, barns, orchards and churches.

     Military government personnel attached to the 80th Infantry Division found that the general feeling among civilians in its area was one of stunned despondency over their misfortunes.  The majority blamed the Nazi Party for the continuance of the war and only a small minority were found who admitted membership in the Nazi Party.

Saturday – 7th April 194538

     0915 – Battalion commander left to inspect Battery “A”.

     0950 – Battalion Commander returned to Battalion CP.

     0001 – 2400 – No missions fire by Battalion.

Saturday – 7th April 1945 HQ & Hq Battery Morning Report39

                              Unterbernhards, Germany wH5635
                    Fobian, Reinhold B.                   37 445 236    Tec. 5                Code A1
                    Moen, Arnold O.                       36 275 613    Pfc.                    Code A1
                    Dardis, Edward M.                     33 792 640    Pvt.                   Code A1
                              Above 3 white EM asgd not jd from 177th FA
                              Gp on Temporary dy Hq Btry XII Corps Arty
                              par 2, SO #20, Hq XII Corps Arty.
                    Gasper, George J.                      35 006 483    Cpl.                  Code A1
                    Topalian, George P.                    31 294 729    Pvt.                  Code A1
                              Above 2 white EM asgd not jd from 182nd FA
                              Gp on Temporary dy Hq Btry XII Corps Arty
                              par 2, SO #20, Hq, XII Corps Arty.
                    Wawec, Gus                              16 042 381    Tec. 4                Code A1
                    Kolmetz, Charles                        32 734 561    Pvt.                   Code A1
                              Above 2 White EM asgd not jd from 183rd FA
                              Gp on Temporary dy Hq Btry, XII Corps Arty
                              Par 2, SO #20, Hq, XII Corps Arty.
                    Robinson, Peter A. I.                  33 195 974    Tec. 4
                    Murray, James P.                       37 512 236    Cpl.
                    Vigliotti, Andrew C.                    32 633 158    Tec. 5
                              Above 3 EM fur 11 days to dy.
                    No limited assignment personnel

Sunday – 8th April 194540

          The estimated enemy strength facing Third U.S. Army at this time was 21,200 combat effective, the equivalent of two and one-half divisions, and 110 tanks or assault guns.

     Positions along the front of XII Corps were maintained by the 90th Infantry Division on the north, 26th Infantry Division in the center and 11th Armored Division on the south.  The 358th and 359th Infantry Regiments (90th Infantry Division) continued their eastern advance, occupying Stützerbach (J23) and Gehlberg (J13), while the 357th Infantry remained in reserve.  To the south, positions of the 26th Infantry Division were consolidated along the Nahe River, and still farther south the 11th Armored Division consolidated positions, with elements of Combat Command “B” out-posting Roth (J00) and Bedheim (J00).  The 71st Infantry Division’s 5th Infantry mopped up behind the 11th Armored Division, while the 66th Infantry maintained its position.  The 2nd Cavalry Group, continuing to screen the Army’s south flank, was relieved from attachment to the 71st Infantry Division.

     Improved weather conditions enabled air observation posts to considerably increase their activity, thus enabling the artillery to take under fire observed targets consisting mainly of enemy troop concentrations and vehicular movements.

     Advance Section Communications Zone took over Third U.S. Army railheads at Heideshedi (M25) and Nieder Ingelheim (M25), west of the Rhine River, and the Army established a forward Class I and Class III transfer point at Alsfeld (H04).  The Army had a total of 1,344,670 gallons of V-80 gasoline in supply points east of the Rhine River.  Ninety heavy tanks, the new T26E3 (the “Pershing”) were released to Third U.S. Army.  Forty of the tanks were released to the 11th Armored Division and the remainder held in the Army combat vehicle pool.

Sunday – 8th April 194541

     0700 – Battalion Commander and Battery Commanders left on reconnaissance for new
               positions at Theimar Germany.

     0800 – Battalion, less Personnel Section, left Unterbernhards for new position in vicinity
               of Theimar

     1710 – Battalion closed in new positions at Theimar.

     1745 – Battalion Commander left for 410th F.A. Group CP.

     1820 – Battalion Commander returned to Battalion CP.

     1900 – XII Corps Azimuth control at 7th April 1945 receive form 410th F.A. Group.

     0001 – 2400 – Batteries “A” and “B” registered and checked transfer with 1 round from
                         each registering piece in town of Streufdorf.  Transfers OK.  One TOT on
                         enemy troops fired.

Tuesday – 8th  April 194542

          The Battalion moved to positions in vicinity of Melkers, Germany (wJ0415) with no change in assignment or mission.

          Caption reads – Hungarian refugees’ front lines

Saturday – 8th April 194543

          The Battalion departed Unterbemhards Germany.

Saturday – 8th April 194544

          The Battalion arrived Theimar Germany.

Sunday – 8th April 1945 HQ & Hq Battery Morning Report45

                              Theimar, Germany wJ0415
                              Btry C this Bn atchd to 9th TD Gp 2 Apr
                              45 Ltr AG 322, Troop Assignment A-37.
          Departed Unterbernhards, Germany wH5623
          via Motor Convoy 0810. Arrived present
          Station 1710. Distance marched 66 miles.
                    No limited assignment personnel.

Sunday – 8th April 1945 Battery “C” Morning Report46

                              Angersbach Germany wH2127
                    Coony, Edward P. FA                   0 556 728    2nd Lt.
                              Reld from dy & placed on Temp dy A Btry
                              this Bn per TOCO 244th FA Bn
                    One EM Limited Assignment Personnel

Sunday – 8th April 1945 Service Battery Morning Report47

                              Theimar, Germany wJ0415
                    Kaminski, Ignatius R.                  36 278 119    Pfc.
                              Fur 11 days to dy as of 7 Apr 45
          Departed Unterbemhards, Germany wH5624
          via Motor Convoy at 0835. Arr present
          Station 1840. Distance marched approxi-
          mately 73 miles.
                    No limited assignment personnel

Dear Folks,
     We are still in our nice house, and all of us are living a life of ease!!  This is a “Cush” job.  A guy could get real fat here.  Just looking at the time – it’s 0730 where you are an 1310 where I am.  The sun is out and its real nice out.  The men are playing baseball, football or setting in the sun. Some are washing clothes or blankets.  I’ve polished my boots and holster and look like “Com. Z” Commando.  The town is out of chickens and eggs are scarce too.  Guess we’d better find another town!!  My love to one and all.
                                                 Tom.

Monday – 9th April 194548

          Resuming its advance to the east in the northern part of XII Corps zone, the 90th Infantry Division captured Gshlberg (J13) and gained five miles.  Unterneubrunn (J21) was cleared by the 101st and 328th Infantry Regiments (26th Infantry Division) which advanced two miles to the east while the 104th Infantry remained in reserve.  On the south, the 11th Armored Division resumed its attack with its Combat Command “A” advancing to Oberlauter (039) while Combat Command “B” entered Rodach (019).  During the course of a ten mile advance, Veilsdorf (J10), Grattstadt (J20), Ottonwind (J20) and Drossenhausen (029) were taken by the armored elements.  While the 14th Infantry (71st Infantry Division) assembled in vicinity of Dreissingacker (H82) the 5th and 66th Infantry Regiments moved forward six miles and cleared by-passed enemy in the rear of 11th Armored Division.  The right flank was screened and contact with Seventh U.S. Array was maintained by the 2nd Cavalry Group.

Monday – 9th April 194549

     0900 – Battalion Exec and S-2 left Battalion CP from Group Headquarters for conference
               with Group commander.

     1005 – Battalion Exec returned to Battalion CP.  S-2 remained at Group to investigate
               court-marshal charges.

     1025 – Battalion S-2 returned to Battalion CP.

     1030 – Battalion Commander left to inspect firing batteries.

     1135 – Battalion Commander returned to Battalion CP.

     1150 – Colonel Yerk, 740th F.A. Battalion Commander, visited Battalion CP for
               conference with Battalion Commander.

     1240 – Colonel Yerk left Battalion CP.

     0001 – 2400 – Both Batteries registered with Normal and Super Charges.  No other
                         missions fired.  Day spent largely on motor maintenance.

Monday – 9th April 194550

          Themar – 

Monday – 9th April 1945 Battery “C” Morning Report51

                              Vacha Germany wH6150
          Departed Angersbach Germany via motor
          convoy at 1015 app present Sta at 1300
          distance marched approximately 47 miles
                    One EM Limited Assignment Personnel

Monday – 9th April 1945

          John H. Bankhead, Alabama, U. S. State Senate – Letter to Mrs. Mathis

Thursday – 10th April 194552

          An operational directive issued to the VIII, XII and XX Corps and the 70th Infantry Division conveyed the following information and orders:

     The enemy was continuing his efforts to defend and delay, utilizing hastily-formed miscellaneous units.  First U.S. Army was continuing to advance east on the left (north), while Seventh U.S. Army was continuing to advance southeast on the right (south).  Third U.S. Army on 11 April was to resume the advance with the main effort on the left (north), was to seize a bridgehead across the Elbe River in its zone, and was to be prepared to continue the advance east or southeast on orders of Twelfth U.S. Army Group.

     XII Corps (26th, 71st and 90th Infantry Divisions, 11th Armored Division and supporting troops) was ordered to attack southeast in its zone, to maintain contact with VIII Corps on the left (north) and Seventh U.S. Army on the right (south), and to protect the right (south) flank of Third U.S. Army.

     In the northern part of XII Corps zone, the 90th Infantry Division resumed its attack to the east with its 358th and 359th Infantry Regiments abreast.  Ilmenau (J23) was cleared in a joint four mile advance of the two regiments.  The Schwarza River was reached by the 101st and 328th Infantry Regiments (26th Infantry Division) while Wiedersbach (J11) and Giessubel (J22) were taken.  The important town of Coburg (028) was cleared by 11th Armored Division which advanced sixteen miles in the southern part of its zone.  Following the 11th Armored Division, the 71st Infantry Division continued mopping up.  To the rear, the Army south flank was screened by the 2nd Cavalry Group.

     The Third U.S. Army attack was resumed in force, as armored elements again passed through the infantry, forming spearheads which raced through Central Germany toward the Czechoslovakian Border.  Numerous towns were taken during the period.

Tuesday – 10th April 194553

     0646 – Battalion Commander, S-2 and Battery Commanders with their parties left on
               reconnaissance for new position area in vicinity of Rodach.

     0930 – Battalion given Close station, March Order.

     1500 – Battalion left old positions at Theimer and moved to positions at Rodach.

     1700 – Battalion less Rear Echelon closed in new position at Rodach.

     1815 – XII Corps Survey Control date 9th April 1945 received from 410th Field
               Artillery Group.

     2000 – Battalion Commander left for Group CP.

     2045 – Battalion Commander returned to Battalion CP.

     0001 – 2400 – Fired two TOT’s on Coburg and two series of H & I missions on Coburg.

Tuesday – 10th April 194554

          The Battalion departed Theimar Germany.

Tuesday – 10th April 194555

          The Battalion moved to positions in vicinity of Rodach, Germany (wO1697).

Tuesday – 10th April 194556

          The Battalion arrived Rodach Germany.

Tuesday – 10th April 194557

          Rodach – (Germany)

Tuesday – 10th April 194558

          Then through Coburg to Weischan and into Kulmbach.  There we rested and drank champagne from the Castle, and everyone got all the souvenirs they desired.  Battery “C” rejoined the Battalion at this point.  This drive originally intended for Bayreuth now turned north toward Hof, 8 miles from the Cech Border to split Germany proper into two parts.

Tuesday – 10th April 1945 HQ & Hq Battery Morning Report59

                              Redach, Germany wO1697
          Departed Theimar, German wJ0415 via
          Motor convoy at 1210. Arrived present
          Station 1715. Distance marched 16 miles
                    No limited assignment personnel

Wednesday – 11th April 194560

          XII Corps was lined up with the 90th Infantry Division on the north, 26th Infantry Division in the center and 11th Armored Division on the south, followed closely by the 71st Infantry Division.  Attacking to the east abreast, the 358th and 359th Infantry Regiments (90th Infantry Division) cleared Langwiesen (J23), Breitenbach (J32) and Gehrne (J33).  In the central part of the corps front, the 101st and 328th Infantry Regiments (26th Infantry Division) advanced abreast, clearing Eisfeld (J20).  To the south, Neustadt (049) was cleared by the 11th Armored Division which continued to advance to the southwest.  Mopping up in the rear of the 11th Armored Division, the 71st Infantry Division gained ten miles, with the 5th Infantry occupying Coburg (028).  The 2nd Cavalry Group continued screening the Army south flank.

     Renewing its armored attack, Third U.S. Army swept closer to the Czechoslovakian border during the period, with enemy resistance generally disorganized.  The important town of Weimar (J57) was taken.

      Forward Echelon of Army Headquarters moved to Hersfeld ((H35), a distance of eighty-five miles from Frankfurt On Main (M67).

          Caption reads – Weimar Germany

Wednesday – 11th April 194561

     0830 – Battalion Exec left to inspect Batteries “A” and “B”.

     0845 – Battalion Commander left for 410th F.A. Group.

     1000 – Battalion Commander returned to Battalion CP.

     1230 – Battalion Commander left old position at Rodach and moved to new position area
               at Cosfeld.

     1430 – Battalion closed in new position vicinity of Cosfeld Germany.

     1525 – Brigadier General Leutz , XII Corps Artillery commander visited Battalion
               Commander and Battalion FDC.

     1540 – Brigadier General Leutz left Battalion FDC.

     1745 – Battalion Commander and S-3 left to inspect firing batteries.

     1930 – Battalion Commander and S-3 returned to Battalion CP.

     0001 – 2400 – Registered both batteries with normal and super charges.  No other
                         missions fired.

Wednesday – 11th April 194562

          The Battalion departed Rodach Germany.

Wednesday – 11th April 194563

          The Battalion arrived Cosfeld Germany.

Wednesday – 11th April 194564

          The Battalion moved to positions in vicinity of Kosfeld Germany  (wO2693).

Wednesday – 11th April 194565

          Wilsenfeld (Weischau Germany)

Wednesday – 11th April 1945 HQ & Hq Battery Morning Report66

                              Kosfeld, Germany wO2693
          Departed Rodach, Germany wO1697 via
          Motor Convoy at 1325. Arrived present
          Station 1405. Distance marched 6 miles.
                    No limited assignment personnel

Wednesday – 11th April 1945 Service Battery Morning Report67

                              Beiersdorf, Germany wO2792
          Departed Theimar, Germany wJ0415 via Motor
          Convoy at 0800. Arr present Sta 1600.
          Distance marched approximately 12 miles.
                    No limited assignment personnel

Thursday – 12th April 194568

          In order from north to south, the 90th Infantry Division, 26th Infantry Division and 11th Armored Division were on the line in XII Corps zone, with the 71st Infantry Division and 2nd Cavalry Group following the 11th Armored Division in the southern part of zone.  All divisions progressed well during the period, with the 90th Infantry Division, 11th Armored Division and 2nd Cavalry Group all crossing the Harlach River and the 26th Infantry Division clearing Sonneburg (J40), Lauscha (J41) and Ernstthal (J41).  The farthest penetrations were made by armored spearheads of the 11th Armored Division which reached the vicinity of Kulmbach (067).  The Army south flank was screened by the 2nd Cavalry Group. Large numbers of prisoners were taken by the 71st Infantry Division in mop up activities.

          Purgatory Society of The Franciscan Fathers

Thursday – 12th April 194569

     0745 – Battalion Commander left for 410th F.A. Group.

     0850 – Battalion Commander returned to Battalion CP.

     1300 – Battalion Commander with Advance Parties left for reconnaissance of new positions
               vicinity of Sonnefeld. Germany

     1400 – Battalion left Cosfeld for new position area in vicinity of
               Sonnefeld, Germany.

     1700 – S/Sgt. Clarence E. Norris, HQ Battery, seriously wounded when a German Bazooka
               exploded after he had picked it up to clear road and throw it to one side.

     1900 – Battalion arrived in new positions at Sonnefeld, Germany.

     0001 – 2400 – No missions fired during period.

Thursday – 12th April 194570

          Staff Sergeant Clarence E. Norris, Chief of Survey Section, was wounded by an exploding Panzerfaust while he was clearing the debris of a knocked out enemy vehicle from the road.  He died of these wounds three day later.

Thursday – 12th April 194571

          The Battalion departed Cosfeld Germany.

Thursday – 12th April 194572

          The Battalion arrived Weischau Germany.

Thursday – 12th April 194573

          Fechen

Thursday – 12th April 194574

          The Battalion moved to positions in vicinity of Weischau Germany (wO4386) still attached to 410th Field Artillery Group with mission of General Support of the 11th Armored Division

Thursday – 12th April 194575

          Colonel Davis Paper

          They were really very sorry to hear about his death (FDR), of course, but there was no noticeable impact.  By that time the war was grinding slowly to a close and the battalion was moving along with the Armor to where we were supposed to rest and wait until the end of the war.  That was really our first rest period since we had landed in France.  But then, just shortly after that, we were ordered to attack with the Army into Czechoslovakia.  That was on the sixth day of May.

Thursday – 12th April 1945 HQ & Hq Battery Morning Report76

                              Weischau, Germany wO4486
                    Norris, Clarence E.                   34 339 707    S/Sgt.                Code M4
                              Dy to lost to Hosp unknow per par 3a, Cir
                              33, Third United States Army, SWA, Germany,
                              Duty 577
          Departed Kosfeld, Germany wO2693 via
          Motor Convoy 1245. Arrived present Sta
          1940.  Distance marched 19 miles.
                    No limited assignment personnel

Thursday – 12th April 1945 Service Battery Morning Report77

                              Sonnefeld, Germany wO4286
          Departed Beiersdorf, Germany wO2792 via
          Motor Convoy at 1330.  Arr present Sta 1950.
          Distance marched approximately 14 miles.
                    No limited assignment personnel

Thursday – 12th April 1945
          Army Service Forces – Letter to Mrs. Mathis

Dear Folks,
     Time sure fly’s past.  It’s been several days since my last letter and I realize it.
     Pet is just opening a bottle of Epernay Champagne.  The people who owned this house had several bottles of wine – they are all “kaput” now.  Nuts – the champagne is flat!!  Ok, will, another day another house and cellar.
   We have been working a little and sitting around a lot.  There is a lot of work to be done on our trucks – and Ord is here so the work is going well.
     The war is going real well – we all hope for the best – and soon.  Two Polish men just came in.  One of the guards caught them killing a neighbor’s pig.  Both were drunk – out after curfew – so into the jail they go.
     Yesterday all the curfew violators (out after 0900) were gathered in a pasture and sat in the sun till 1730 – no toilet, water – etc.  We let them go after reading them the riot act.  A Dutch with us told them the truth about Holland – some cried some were sober – all wiser.  Today – no violators.
   This job has a lot of variety – all of us like it.  Will write more about things in a couple of days.
                                                        Love to all
                                                             Tom

Friday – 13th April 194578

          Third U.S. Army was ordered to continue its advance east to the line Zwickauer – Mulde River from the point on the inter-Army boundary in the vicinity of Rocklitz (K58) to Wilkau (K34) – Plauen (K10) – Hof (099) – Bayreuth (075), and be prepared to resume the advance east, southeast or south on order of Twelfth U.S. Army Group.

     XII Corps (26th, 71st and 90th Infantry Divisions, 11th Armored Division and supporting troops) was to continue to advance southeast to the line at the inter-corps boundary at (K0913), thence to the road through Blosenburg (K00) – Hof (099) – Munchberg (088) – Berneck (086) to the inter-Army Group boundary at (O7853), pushing light reconnaissance forward on this line only to secure essential terrain features.  XII Corps was to continue to advance southeast or south on Array order.

     The change in the VIII-XII Corps boundary was confirmed as follows:

     There was no change to (J5733), thence along the Saale River to (J8323), thence northeast to a point on the current boundary at (J9026), thence along the current boundary to Adorf (K20).  The limiting points were:  VIII Corps, (K3654) and (K0913), XII Corps, (K0913) and (O7853), and XX Corps, (K5486) and (K3654).

     Advancing to the east in the northern part of XII Corps zone, the 90th Infantry Division captured Rottersdorf (J61), Heberndorf (J61), Ruppersdorf (J71) and Lothra (J72) and captured two bridges intact across the Saale River.  Gains of up to ten miles were made by the 26th Infantry Division which cleared Golsberg (059) and Buchbach (J50) and on the south flank Kulmbach (067) and Stadt Steinach (068).  Numerous small towns were taken by 11th Armored Division as it continued to advance to the southeast.  The 2nd Cavalry Group moved through the 11th Armored Division with the 413th Cavalry Reconnaissance Squadron advancing more than thirty miles to the outskirts of Bayreuth (075), thirty miles from the Czechoslovakia border.  Close support was furnished 11th Armored Division by the 71st Infantry Division, which screened the south flank and continued mopping up by-passed enemy.

Friday – 13th April 194579

     0800 – Battalion commander left for 410th Field Artillery Group.

     0800 – XII Corps Survey Controls dated 10th April 1945 received from 410th F.A. Group.
               Transmitted to Assistant S-2.

     0800 – XII Corps Survey Information Center List received from 410th F.A. Group.

     0845 – Battalion Commander returned to Battalion CP.

     1100 – Battalion given Close station, March Order by 410th F.A. Group and told to stand
               by and wait further instructions.

     1230 – Battalion Commander with Battery Commanders and Advance Parties left Battalion
               CP to precede Battalion which will move later.

     1430 – Battalion moved from positions at Sonnefeld, Germany.

     1600 – Receive XII Corps Survey Control from 410th F.A. Group dated 11th March 1945.

     1930 – Battalion arrive in new positions vicinity of Kulmbach, Germany.

     0001 – 2400 – Fire into Bayreuth starting at 2200 at the rate of 3 rounds per hour as
                         H & I.  Prepared one normal and two emergency barrages.

Friday – 13th April 194580

          The Battalion departed Weischau Germany.

Friday – 13th April 194581

          The Battalion moved to positions in the vicinity of Kulmbach, Germany (wO6572).

Friday – 13th April 194582

          The Battalion arrived Kulmbach Germany.

Friday – 13th April 194583
          Byron G. Rogers, A Battery

          We moved to Hof, about 8 miles from the Czeck border in an effort to split Germany into two parts.

          Caption reads – April 1945, Kulmbach Germany, Sgt. McPherson Able Battery

          Caption reads – April 1945, Kulmbach Germany, T5 Frank Balog, Able Battery

          Caption reads – April 1945, Kulmbach Germany, T/4 McPherson Able Battery

Friday – 13th April 1945 HQ & Hq Battery Morning Report84

                            Kulmbach, Germany wO6572
        Departed Weischau, Germany wO4486 via
        Motor Convoy 1500. Arrived present Sta
        1925.  Distance marched 23 miles.
                    No limited assignment personnel

Friday – 13th April 1945 Battery “C” Morning Report85

                              Eisfeld, Germany wJ2508
                                        CORRECTION (1 Apr 45)
                              Organization became Non-operational as
                              FA and atchd to 9th TD Gp for administra-
                              tion and dy as Security Guard per VOCG
                              XII Corps.
                                        SHOULD BE
                              Deleted
                                        RECORD OF EVENTS
                              Organization became Non-operational as
                              FA & atchd to 9th TD Gp for administra-
                              tion & dy as Security Guard per ltr AG
                              322 (CNMLC), Hq XII Corps, 2 Apr 45.
          Departed Vacha Germany via motor convoy
          at 0815.  Arr present Sta at 1230 distance
          marched approximately 67 miles
                    One EM Limited Assignment Personnel

Friday – 13th April 1945 Service Battery Morning Report86

                              Kulmback, Germany wO6572
          Departed Sonnefield, Germany wO4286 via
          Motor convoy at 0800. Arr present Sta 945.  Distance
          marched approximately 19 miles.
                    No limited assignment personnel

          Plassenburg Castle, Kulmback Germany

          As it turns out, Plassenburg Castle had a very large wine cellar.  Everyone had enough to drink and drink and drink.

Saturday – 14th April 194587

          In the northern part of XII Corps front, the 90th Infantry Division advanced twelve miles east of the Saale River.  Schelgel (J80), Bruck (J80) and Goritz (J81) were cleared in this advance, with the 358th Infantry (90th Infantry Division) driving to within three miles of Hof (099).  To the south, all three regiments of the 26th Infantry Division advanced abreast, gaining up to fifteen miles.  On the south flank, Bayreuth (075) was captured by the 11th Armored Division which then pulled back to an assembly area.  The 2nd Cavalry Group assumed positions southeast of Bayreuth (075) and the 71st Infantry Division relieved the 11th Armored Division in the city and to the northwest.

     Third U.S. Army continued its sweeping advances to within ten miles of the Czechoslovakian border, fifteen miles from Leipzig (E21) and five miles from Chemnitz (K66). Baireuth (075) and Gera (K06) were taken during the period.

Saturday – 14th April 194588

     0800 – Battalion Commander left to inspect firing batteries.

     0945 – Battalion Commander returned to Battalion CP.

     1815 – XII Corps Survey Control dated 12th April 1945 received from 410th F.A. Group.
               Forwarded to Assistant S-2.  Fired three Battalion volleys into town of St. Johaunis,                 observed by Air OP, excellent results obtained.  Normal barrage prepared on                         Bayrouth.

Saturday – 14th April 194589

          Kulmbach (Germany), Champagne, beer, rape

          Plassenburg Castle wine cellar, Tec/4 Herman A. Barksdale, ___—____, Cpl Wiley A. Parsons, Battery B.

          Plassenburg Castle wine cellar,  Tec/4 Herman A. Barksdale, ___—____, Cpl Wiley A. Parsons, Battery B

Sunday – 15th April 194590

          Hof (099) and Frossen (J81) were captured by the 90th Infantry Division in the northern part of XII Corps zone, bringing its forces up to a line running north from the city.  The Saale River was crossed at several points north of Hof (099) by the 90th Infantry Division, and south of that city by the 26th Infantry Division which captured Munchberg (088) and consolidated positions between Hof (099) and Gefrees (087).  Positions between Gefrees (087) and Bayreuth (075) were consolidated by the 71st Infantry Division as the advance of XII Corps was materially slowed down to allow reorganization for the continuance of the attack.  The 2nd Cavalry Group initially occupied positions southeast of Bayreuth (075) but was relieved during the period by the 71st Infantry Division, then pulling back to an assembly area.  Throughout the period, the 11th Armored Division was in assembly.

      Having reached the line Muld River – Zwickauer-Muld River, Plauen (K10), Hof (099), Bayreuth (075), Third U.S. Army halted its advance in conformance with verbal orders of the Supreme Commander, given on 12th April 1945.

     The 120th Evacuation Hospital moved to Ettersburg (J47) to provide medical service for inmates of the large concentration camp there known as Buchenwald.  Of 21,000 persons in the camp, approximately 5,000 needed immediate medical care.

Sunday – 15th April 194591

0905 – Battalion Exec left to inspect positions of firing batteries.

1030 – Battalion Commander left for 410th F.A. Group.

1050 – Battalion Exec returned to Battalion CP.

1115 – Battalion Commander returned to Battalion CP.

0001 – 2400 – March order the Battalion awaiting orders to move.

Sunday – 15th April 1945 HQ & Hq Battery Morning Report92

                              Kulmhach, Germany wO6572
                              Bn reorganized under T/O & E 6-355 dtd
                              6 Feb 45 and this organization reorgann-
                              ized 9 Apr 45 under T/O & E 6-56 dtd 20
                              Oct 44 per secret ltr, Hq, Third U.S.
                              Army, file AG 320.2 – Arty – GNMCC dtd
                              8 Apr 45
                    No limited assignment personnel

Sunday – 15th April 1945 Service Battery Morning Report93

                              Kulmback, Germany wO6572
                    No Change
                              Unit reorganized 9 Apr 45 under T/O and E
                              6-359 dtd 6 Feb 45 per secret ltr, Hq.,
                              Third U.S. Army file AG 320.2 – Auty GNMCC
                              dtd 8 Apr 45.

Monday – 16th April 194594

          Troops of XII Corps were disposed with the 90th Infantry Division on the north, then the 26th Infantry Division, and the 71st Infantry Division on the south.  The 11th Armored Division was in reserve and the 2nd Cavalry Group was on the south flank patrolling.  There was no advance during the period although aggressive patrols were maintained.  The 2nd Cavalry Group went into assembly during the period, being relieved by elements of the 71st Infantry Division.

Monday – 16th April 194595

     0830 – Battalion Commander left for 410th F.A. Group.

     0920 – Battalion Commander returned to Battalion CP.

     0001 – 2400 – Battalion still waiting orders for movement – use time primarily for
                         maintenance.  Four 155mm Guns and Tractor drawn from  273rd F.A.
                         Battalion for Battery “C”.  Battery “C” relieve from detached service as
                         Security Guards and will join Battalion.

Monday – 16th April 194596

          Battery “C” released from special duty as Security Guards and returned to Battalion control.  Drew guns and tractors from 273rd Field Artillery Battalion.

          Battery “A” 1st. Sgt. Raymond Cormier Certificate to mail home captured enemy equipment 

          Arm Band

          Hat Insignia

Tuesday – 17th April 194597

          XII Corps (26th, 90th and 97th Infantry Divisions, 11th Armored Division and supporting troops) was to move the 71st Infantry Division to relieve elements of XV Corps in the left of its zone, then pass control to XX Corps.  It was to relinquish control of that portion of the 90th Infantry Division zone north of the new-inter-Army boundary upon relief by VIII Corps.  It was to continue to attack southeast in zone, assume command of the 97th Infantry Division upon its arrival in the corps zone and protect the left flank of Third U.S. Army.

     Patrols of the 90th Infantry Division (XII Corps) covered the Czechoslovakian border northeast of Hof (099) while the 26th Infantry Division gained along its front, occupying positions previously covered by patrols.  In a zone north of Bayreuth (075), Combat Command “B” and Reserve Combat Command (11th Armored Division) relieved elements of the 71st Infantry Division in place and prepared to attack to the southeast.  Upon being relieved, the 71st Infantry Division moved back to assembly area.  The south flank was patrolled by the 2nd Cavalry Group.

Tuesday – 17th April 194598

     0715 – Battalion Commander, S-2 and Battery Commander left on reconnaissance for new
               position at Koditz 

     0800 – Battalion began move to Koditz.

     1245 – Battalion CP and FDC established at Koditz, Germany.an reported ready
               to fire.

     0001 – 2400 – Registered “A” and checked “B” on check point in Czechoslovakia.
                         Battery “C” rejoined Battalion.  Battalion released  of attachment to 410th
                         F.A. Group and attached to 177th F.A. Group.

Tuesday – 17th April 194599

          The Battalion departed Kulmbach Germany and arrived Koditz Germany.

Tuesday – 17th April 1945100

          The Battalion arrived Koditz Germany.  The Battalion moved to Koditz just outside of Hof.  From there it traveled southeast along the Czech border providing left flank protection for the Third Army in the drive which was to cut all escape routes to the Redoubt Area and eventually end in Austria.  The Battalion stopped daily at such hamlets as Wurlitz, Wendern, Pfaffenreuth, Leugas, Schirnbrunn, Schneeberg Dofering and Furth.

Tuesday – 17th April 1945101

          The Battalion moved to new position in the vicinity of Koditz, Germany (wJ9200) and relieved of attachment to 410th Field Artillery Group and attached to 177th field Artillery Group with mission of general support, XII Corps and supporting 90th Infantry Division.

Tuesday – 17th April 1945102
          Colonel Davis Paper

          We went on and on.  We were traveling, finally, along the Czech border, providing left flank protection with the Armor for the Third Army in a drive that was to cut off all escape routes into the redoubt area and eventually into Austria.

Tuesday – 17th April 1945103
          Byron G. Rogers, A Battery

          We moved again on April 17, 1945, traveling southeast along the Czeck border in an effort to cut off all escape routes to Austria.  By this time the war was grinding slowly to a close.

Tuesday – 17th April 1945104

          Hof (Germany) Shakedown Inspection (C.B.I.?)

Tuesday – 17th April 1945 HQ & Hq Battery Morning Report105

                              Koditz, Germany wJ9200
          Departed Kulmbach, Germany wO6572 via
          Motor Convoy at 0925. Arrived present
          Sta 1240. Distance marched 32 miles.
                    No limited assignment personnel.

Tuesday – 17th April 1945 Service Battery Morning Report106

                              1¼ mi N Koditz, Germany wJ9201
          Departed Kulmback, Germany wO6572 via
          Motor Convoy at 0920. Arr present Sta1550.
          Distance marched approximately
          36 miles.
                    No limited assignment personnel

          Caption reads – Old pals, L to R 1st. Lt. T. B. Marriott, jr. and PFC Lewis E. Atkins, 

          No caption – 1st. Lt. T. B. Marriott, jr.

Wednesday – 18th April 1945107

          In the grand-scale regrouping of Third U.S. Army units the make-up of XII Corps was effected by the passing of 71st Infantry Division to XX Corps.  The 90th Infantry Division resumed its advance in the northern part of zone with its 357th and 358th Infantry Regiments while the 359th Infantry went into assembly.  Gains of up to eight miles were made by elements of the division during the period.  In the central part of the front the 101st and 104th Infantry Regiments (26th Infantry Division) resumed their attack, gaining nine miles and taking Kirchenlamitz (P08), while on the south the attack of the 11th Armored Division made good progress as Combat Command “B” advanced eleven miles to Trehmersdorf (093) and Combat Command “A” cleared woods northeast of Kirchenlaibach (084).  Slowly advancing along the north flank, the 2nd Cavalry Group screened along the Czechoslovakian border.

Wednesday – 18th April 1945108

     0815 – Battalion Commander left to inspect firing batteries and Service Battery.

     0920 – XII Corps Survey Controls date 17th April 1945 and XII Corps Azimuth Control
               dated 17th April 1945 received from 177th F.A. Group.  Forwarded to Assistant S-2.

     1000 – Battalion Commander returned to Battalion CP.

     1325 – Battalion Commander an S-3 left to inspect firing batteries.

     1700 – Field Message No. 79, HQ, 90th Infantry Division with Operations Overlay
               date 18113003 April 1945 received through 177th F.A Group.

     0001 – 2400 – Fired observed mission on enemy troops dug in around road block with good
                         effect – one hit on road block.  Reported fire 30 minutes later when AOP
                         reported further movement in vicinity; good effect; Battalion alerted to
                         move to Wurletr.

Wednesday – 18th April 1945 HQ & Hq Battery Morning Report109

                              Koditz, Germany wJ9200
          No Change
                    No limited assignment personnel

Thursday – 19th April 1945110

          XII Corps advanced southeast, the 90th Infantry Division (north), 26th Infantry Division (center), and 11th Armored Division (south) gaining eleven miles, twelve miles and fifteen miles respectively.  Rehau (P09) was cleared by the 90th Infantry Division, while Grafenwohr (P03) was taken by 11th Armored Division.  On the north flank the 2nd Cavalry Group kept contact with VIII Corps.

     In the area of the 6th Armored Division the general reaction among the people was found to be semi-relief that the war apparently was drawing to a close.  The average citizen claimed to be ignorant of the atrocities in Nazi concentration camps and laid responsibility for the war and defeat upon the Nazi leadership.

Thursday – 19th April 1945111

     0700 – Battalion Commander, S-3 and Battery Commanders left on reconnaissance for
               new position at Wurlitz.

     0800 – Battalion moved from Koditz  to position at Wurlitz (Wurlitz, Rehau),
               Germany.

     1140 – Battalion CP and FDC closed at Wurlitz, Germany.

     1630 – Colonel Baker, 33rd F.A. Brigade, visited Battalion Commander at Battalion CP.

     1700 – Colonel Baker left Battalion CP.

     0001 – 2400 – Registered “A” and “B” Batteries; checked transfer with “A” Battery; “C”
                         Battery has Ordnance working on guns – not ready to fire.  Fifteen
                         Prisoners of War captured from woods and fields near gun positions.

Thursday – 19th April 1945112

          The Battalion departed Koditz Germany.

Thursday – 19th April 1945113

          The Battalion moved to new positions in the vicinity of Wurlitz Germany (wP0292).

Thursday – 19th April 1945114

          Wurlitz (Germany) near Rehau (Germany)

Thursday – 19th April 1945115

          The Battalion arrived Wurlitz Germany.  Staff Sargent Clarence E. Norris – Ashland, Mississippi, Headquarters Battery was wounded (later died) by a German bazooka dud.

Thursday – 19th April 1945 HQ & Hq Battery Morning Report116

                              Wurlitz, Germany wP0292
          Departed Koditz, Germany wJ9200 via
          Motor Convoy at 0915. Arrived present
          sta 1145. Distance marched 11 miles.
                    No limited assignment personnel

Thursday – 19th April 1945 Battery “C” Morning Report117

                              Wurlitz Germany ½ mi S wP0392
          Departed Hof Germany 1½ mi N.W. via motor
          convoy at 1000 arr present Sta at 1200
          distance marched approximately 11 miles
                    One EM Limited Assignment Personnel

Thursday – 19th April 1945 Service Battery Morning Report118

                              Wurlitz, Germany wP0392
          Departed from 1¼ m N of Koditz, Germany
          wJ9201 via Motor Convoy at 1000. Arr
          present Sta 1430. Distance marched ap-
          approximately 12 miles.
                    No limited assignment personnel

          Caption reads – Pfc. Merle J. Coy, Pfc. Edward A. Wantke. Steaks for dinner, Haf

          Caption reads – Pfc Mitchell, Pfc Jack Berry, S/Sgt Floyd R. Williams, Tec/5 Nello C. Stover, Pfc William S. Graff Battery B. kitchen

          Caption reads – Pfc Raymond Peracciny and the Kitchen Crew, Hof

Friday – 20th April 1945119

          Advances to the southeast of the 90th and 26th Infantry Divisions (XII Corps) continued through the period as the 26th Infantry Division gained eleven miles, clearing Metzenhof (O83), Kemnath, (O94), Pressath (P03) and Erbeedorf (P04) while the 90th Infantry Division gained twelve miles, and cleared Brand (P16) and Seussen (P16).  In the southern part of zone Combat Commands “A” and “B” (11th Armored Division) maintained their positions near Grafenwohr (P03) while Reserve Combat Command assembled in vicinity of Esceenbach (093).  The 2nd Cavalry Group cleared As (P18) in its continued advance while it screened the north flank and maintained contact with 6th Cavalry Group (VIII Corps).  The 97th Infantry Division was assigned to the corps and was enroute to corps zone.

Friday – 20th April 1945120

     0835 – Battalion Commander, S-2 and Battery Commanders left on reconnaissance for new
               positions at Gros Wendern Germany.

     1100 – Battalion marched order prior to moving out at 1300.

     1300 – Battalion began to move to Gros Wendern.

     1500 – Battalion CP an FDC closed in new positions at Gros Wendern.

     1515 – Battalion in position and reported ready to fire.

     1700 – Battalion Commander left for 33rd F.A. Brigade.

     1735 – Battalion Commander returned from 33rd F.A. Brigade.

     0001 – 2400 – Battalion fired on three enemy vehicles and 20 infantrymen with good effect.

Friday – 20th April 1945121

          The Battalion departed Wurlitz Germany.

Friday – 20 April 1945122

          The Battalion moved to new positions in the vicinity of Gross Wendern Germany (wP0580).

Friday – 20th April 1945123

          The Battalion arrived Gross Wendern Germany.

Friday – 20th April 1945124

          Gross Wendern (Germany) near Selb (Germany)

Friday – 20th April 1945 HQ & Hq Battery Morning Report125

                              Gross Wendern, Germany wP0580
          Departed Wurlitz, Germany wP0292 via
          Motor Convoy at 1300. Arrived present Sta
          1525.  Distance marched approximately 16
          miles.
                    No limited assignment personnel

Friday – 20th April 1945 Battery “C” Morning Report126

                              Gross Wendern Germany ¼ mi N W
                    Grace, Albert L.                      31 230 763    Tec. 5
                              Dy to sk qrs LD
          Departed Wurlitz Germany ½ mi S via motor
          convoy at 1300 arr present Sta at 1530
          distance marched approximately 18 miles
                    One EM Limited Assignment Personnel

Friday – 20th April 1945 Service Battery Morning Report127

                              Gross-Wendern, Germany wP0580
          Departed Wurlitz, Germany wP0392 via
          Motor Convoy at 1300. Arr present Sta
          1525.  Distance marched approximately
          16 miles.
                    No limited assignment personnel

Saturday – 21st April 1945128

          XII Corps -was lined up with 2nd Cavalry Group on the north, then the 90th and 26th Infantry Divisions, and 11th Armored Division on the south.  All attacked to the southeast, the 26th Infantry Division gaining eight miles and taking Schwarzenbach (F03) and Parkstein (P13).  Advancing twelve miles, the 90th Infantry Division cleared Falkenberg (P24) and entered Arzberg (P17).  Combat Command “A” (11th Armored Division) cleared Weiden (P12) while Reserve Combat Command entered Hirschau (P01).  Continuous north flank contact with VIII Corps was furnished by the 2nd Cavalry Group, which advanced four miles and captured Haslov (P28).

Saturday – 21st April 1945129

     0940 – Brigadier General Birdy, 90th Infantry Division Artillery Commander, visited
               Battalion FDC.

     0955 – Brigadier General Birdy left Battalion FDC.

     1300 – Battalion Commander left to inspect firing batteries.

     1350 – Battalion Commander returned to Battalion CP.

     1430 – 177th F.A. Group Executive visited Battalion CP.

     1455 – 177th F.A. Group Executive left Battalion CP.

     1545 – Battalion S-3 and Battery Reconnaissance Parties left on reconnaissance for new
               position area at Leugea.

     1730 – Battalion S-3 returned to Battalion CP.

     0001 – 2400 – Registered Battery “A” and checked Battery “B” on (wP288641); checked
                         Battery “C” on road junction at (wP155440).  Fired two missions – one on
                         enemy vehicles; one on working party with good effect.

Saturday – 21st April 1945130

          The Battalion departed Gross Wendern Germany.

Saturday – 21st April 1945131

          The Battalion moved to new positions in the vicinity of wP1167, Germany.

Saturday – 21st April 1945132

          The Battalion arrived Pfaffenreuth Germany.

Saturday – 21st April 1945133

            C.S.M.O. 3 AM Marktedwitz (Marktredwitz Germany)

Saturday – 21st April 1945 HQ & Hq Battery Morning Report134

                              Pfaffenreuth, Germany wP1162
                    Durrell, Lynnwood A.                  20 140 138    T/Sgt.                Code J1
                              Trfd in gr to and departed for Hq Btry,
                              410th FA Gp per par 3, SO #11, Hq 410th
                              FA Gp. 17 April 45
          Departed Gross Wender, Germany wP0580
          via Motor Convoy at 0600. Arrived present
          sta 0710. Distance marched approximately
          19 miles.
                    No limited assignment personnel

Saturday – 21st April 1945 Battery “C” Morning Report135

                              Waldershof Germany ¾ mi E wP1262
          Departed Gross Werdern Germany ¼ mi E via
          motor convoy at 0600 arr present Sta at
          0800 distance marched approximately 18
          miles
                    One EM Limited Assignment Personnel

Saturday – 21st April 1945 Service Battery Morning Report136

                              Marktredwitz, Germany wP0830
                    Falkenstein, Robert R.                 0 466 791    Capt.
                              Dy to temporary dy approximately 8 days
                              City Universitaire, Paris, France. 19 Apr.
                    Catanzaro, Archie A.                  32 013 198    Pvt.
                              Asgd and jd from Hq Btry 410th FA Gp per
                              par 4, SO #11, hq 410th FA Gp. Race W
                              17 April 45.
          Departed Gross-Wendern, Germany wP0680
          via Motor Convoy at 0600. Arr present
          Sta 0830. Distance marched approximately
          15 miles.
                    No limited assignment personnel

Note – Unable to determine why there is the discrepancy in location of town (Marktrewiktz) given and map coordinate (wP0830) given above in the 21st April 1945 Service Battery Morning Report. The distance between both locations is approximately 35 miles.

Sunday – 22nd April 1945137

          In the northern part of XII Corps zone, the 97th Infantry Division closed with the 303rd, 386th and 387th Infantry Regiments going into assembly areas near Hoof (O99), prepared to protect along the Czechoslovakian border.  To the south, the 90th Infantry Division was advancing to the south along the Czechoslovakian border.  Still farther south, the 11th Armored Division continued gaining ground to the southeast.  Combat Command “A” advanced to Haag (P40), while Reserve Combat Command cleared Hirschau (P01) and Schnaittenbach (P01) and Combat Command “B” reached Unttraubenbach (U57).  Following the 11th Armored Division, the 26th Infantry Division mopped up enemy, gaining fifteen miles.  A reconnaissance screen along the Czechoslovakian border was maintained by 2nd Cavalry Group.

     Deployed with the XII Corps on the north, XX Corps in the center and III Corps on the south, the Army was pivoting to attack due south with XII Corps screening the Czechoslovakian border as it moved south.

     Forward Echelon of Army Headquarters moved to Erlangen (035), a distance of one hundred and fifty miles from Hersfeld (R35)

Sunday – 22nd April 1945138

     0500 – Battalion given Close Station, March Order.

     0700 – Battalion began moving to new position at Leugas.

     0800 – Battalion closed in new positions at Leugas.

     1235 – Battalion Exec and Battery Commandeer with their parties left on reconnaissance
               for new positions at Schonficht.

     1450 – Receive from 177th F.A. Group Overlay of 90th Division Check Points, Series VIII,
               date 22nd April 1945.  Map Scale used:  1/100,000.

     1500 – Battalion Exec and parties returned to Battalion CP.

     0001 – 2400 – Fired upon (wP889417) and two half-tracks and personnel at (wP361612).
                         Two direct hits on 88 positions.  Fire effect.   Fired upon German Infantry –                           approximately company strength.  Infantry dispersed but visibility to poor to                           determine casualties.  Started to shift Battery “C” from Az 2500 to 900 at                             1145 – complete at 1305.

Note:  244th Field Artillery Journal report 22nd April 1945 above, 0001 – 2400. Unable to determine how map coordinate wP889417 is possible as it is well inside the Czech Republic.

Sunday – 22nd April 1945139

          The Battalion departed Pfaffenreuth Germany.

Sunday – 22nd April 1945140

          The Battalion moved to new positions in the vicinity of Leugas Germany (wP2154).

Sunday – 22nd April 1945141

          The Battalion arrived Leugas Germany.

Sunday – 22nd April 1945142

          4 AM C.S.M.O. Now S.O.P. (Standard Operating Procedure) Wissam

Sunday – 22nd April 1945 HQ & Hq Battery Morning Report143

                              Leugas, Germany wP2154

                    Meyer, Milton S.                      01 177 090    1st Lt.              Code J1
                              Trfd to and departed for Hq 410 FA Gp
                              Per par 3, SO #27, Hq XII Corps Artillery
                              21 April 45.
          Departed Pfaffenreuth, Germany wP1162 via
          Motor Convoy at 0700. Arrived present Sta745.
          Distance marched approximately 8
          miles.
                    No limited assignment personnel

Sunday – 22nd April 1945 Battery “C” Morning Report144

                              Schonhaid Germany 1 mi N.E. wP2153
          Departed Waldershof Germany ¾ mi E via
          motor convoy a 0700 arr present Sta at
          0900 distance marched approximately 8
          miles
                              Reld atchmt 9th TD GP rejd Bn 17 Apr 45
                              Reverted to normal functions as FA per
                              VOCG XII Corps 17 Apr 45
                              Unit reorganized 9 Apr 45 under T/O & E
                              6-357 dtd 6 Feb 45 per secret ltr Hq
                              Third US Army file AG 320.2 – Arty –
                              GNMCC dtd 8 Apr 45
                    One EM Limited Assignment Personnel

Monday – 23rd April 1945145

          Disposition of XII Corps units was different from that of any corps at any time in Third U.S. Army’s operations.  The 11th Armored Division preceded the 26th Infantry Division, 90th Infantry Division, 2nd Cavalry Group and 97th Infantry Division in the order named.  All units in the rear of the armor were moving south while screening along the Czechoslovakian border.  Thus, there was a continuous following column of three infantry divisions and one cavalry group.  Combat Command “B” (11th Armored Division) reached a point four miles from Regen (U95), capturing bridges over the Regen River at Cham (U58) and Miltach (U67).  Combat Command “A” followed closely behind Combat Command “B” as both combat commands gained more than twenty miles.  Mopping up behind the armor, the 26th Infantry Division reached the line Steinberg (U28) Dautersdorf (U49).  Other units advanced south as they were relieved in zone from the north.

     A large enemy ammunition dump containing an estimated 3,000,000 chemical warfare shells was uncovered in the vicinity of Grafenwöhr (P03).

Monday – 23rd April 1945146

     1410 – Battalion Commander, S-2 and Battery Commanders left on reconnaissance for
               new positions at Wildenau.

     1430 – Battalion given Close Station, March Order.

     1530 – Battalion began movement to new positions at Wildenau.

     1630 – Battalion close in new position at Wildenau.

     0001 – 2400 – Fired one H & I mission on towns of Gross Konrenth.  Fired one mission on enemy CP in town of Playstein.

Monday – 23rd April 1945147

          The Battalion departed Leugas Germany.

Monday – 23rd April 1945148

          The Battalion moved to new positions in the vicinity of Wildenau, Germany (wP2541)

Monday – 23rd April 1945149

          The Battalion arrived Schirnbrunn Germany.

Monday – 23rd April 1945150

          Wildenau (Luhe-Wildenau Germany)

Monday – 23rd April 1945 HQ & Hq Battery Morning Report151

                              Schirnbrunn, Germany wP2541
          Departed Leugas, Germany wP21542154 via Motor
          Convoy at 1530. Arrived present Sta 1630.
          Distance marched approximately 8 miles.
                    No limited assignment personnel

Monday – 23rd April 1945 Battery “C” Morning Report152

                              Wildenau Gerany wP2540
                    Grace, Albert L.                      31 230 763    Tec.5
                              Dk qrs LD to dy
          Departed Schonhaid Germany 1 mi N.E. via
          motor convoy at 1600 arr present Sta at
          1700 distance marched approximately 12
          Miles
                    One EM Limited Assignment Personnel

Monday – 23rd April 1945 Service Battery Morning Report153

                              Schonkirch, Germany wP2742
          Departed Marktredwitz, Germany wP0830 via
          Motor Convoy at 1515. Arrived present Sta
          1745 distance marched approximately 26
          miles.
                    No limited assignment personnel

          Caption reads – April 1945, A  Wehrmacht Officer captured by A Battery 244th F.A. Bn. 

          Caption reads – April 1945, A Lieutenant in the German Wehrmacht surrender 

Dear Family,
     It’s been quite a long time, hasn’t it?  Well, a lot has been happened to us.  We are back in the Battalion and have been re-issued our guns!  We sure hated to leave our last job.  It was by far the best thing that has ever happened to us.
     We were our own boss.  No one ever bothered us.  We always had the nicest house, lights, showers, beds, good food and steam heat plant.   All of this we traded for a tent, “C” rations, straw bed and no baths.  One day you “is” the next day – you “ain’t”.
     We took a jolt on the guns.  We got another Battalions and they were in rotten shape. We were all quite sore because the guns we turned in were in very good condition.  We aren’t doing much shooting now – seems as if all the Germans have kind of quit – at least in our sector they have.  All we do is move, get settled – move again.  Yesterday was rotten.  It rained, snowed, hailed, and the sun was out.  The wind is blowing about 20 MPH and it’s quite cold out.
      We all hope to be the first to see the Russians, but it like someone else is going to beat us.
      There is still a lot of Champagne around, in fact we have a 25 bottle case outside.  It’s real good, bottled in ’26!!!  We make French fries and drink a little Champagne before going to bed.
     Mail is real slow. Two days ago we got our first mail in two weeks.  I got 2 lines, one from Peg and one from Jane.  The letters were dated 27 Mar.  Where the others are – I don’t know.  It’s about a 4 day trip to the A.P.O.
     You can add Kronash, Vacca, Eisfeld, and Haf to my list.  They are rather modern towns – the people hostile, but have made no moves against us – yet.  I’ve got to write Jane, we expect to leave here – so I’ll close.
                                                    Love to all,
                                                       Tom

Tuesday – 24th April 1945154

          The 11th Armored Division continued to lead the attack of XII Corps.  It’s Combat Command “B” advanced twenty-eight miles, cleared Regen (U95) and reached Schonberg  (Q06) while Combat Command “A” reached the vicinity of Zwiessel (Q06).  Crossing the Regen River, the 101st and 328th Infantry Regiments (26th Infantry Division) gained fifteen miles while mopping up behind the 11th Armored Division.  Upon relief by the 2nd Cavalry Group from the north, the 90th Infantry Division moved farther south.  A continuous screen along the Czechoslovakian border was furnished by the 90th Infantry Division, 2nd Cavalry Group and 97th Infantry Division.

Tuesday – 24th April 1945155

     0645 – XII corps Survey control dated 22 April 1945 received from 177th F.A. Group.

     0845 – Battalion Exec left to inspect firing batteries.

     1045 – Battalion Exec returned to Battalion CP.

     1330 – XII corps Survey Control dated 23 April 1945 received from 177th F.A. Group.

     1440 – Battalion Commander left to inspect firing batteries.

     1600 – Battalion Commander returned to Battalion CP.

     0001 – 2400 – Fired three unobserved missions on enemy troops and one on enemy CP.

Tuesday – 24th April 1945 Battery “C” Morning Report156

                              Wildenau Germany wP2540
                    One EM Limited Assignment Personnel

Dear Folks,
     Being in a house makes it easier to write so again I report – all’s well.   Coyne is in Atlantic City and doing real well.  He is going on leave (30 days) so you can see he recovered real fast.  The surprise was  a “Bronze Star Medal” – the reason I didn’t say more was because it was made up and submitted as a “Silver Star” but came back “Bronze”.  We haven’t been given them yet, but someday soon they will be awarded to us.  The citation hasn’t been published so I can’t let you in on the reason I got it.  It’s a letdown for me – I expected more – I deserved it.  Love to all
                                                                  Tom.

Wednesday – 25th April 1945157

          Rapid advance of 11th Armored Division in XII Corps zone was continued seventeen miles as Combat Command “A” cleared Grafenau (Q14), and Freyung (Q23), and Combat Command “B” reached vicinity five miles southeast of Freyung (Q23) only ten miles from the Austrian border.  To the rear, the 104th and 328th Infantry Regiments (26th Infantry Division) advanced twenty-one miles, clearing Zeitldorn (U45), Steinach (U55) and Falkenstein (U46) while following the armor and mopping up in zone.  Still farther to the rear, the 90th Infantry Division, 2nd Cavalry Group and 97th Infantry Division in the order named, moved south along the Czechoslovakia border as relief could be furnished from the north.

     As the large-scale attack of Third U.S. Army into the Redoubt area entered its fourth day, elements of XII Corps reached points only ten miles from the Austrian border.  The Danube (Dnau) River was crossed both east and west of Regensburg (U15).  On this important day the long awaited link-up between American and Russian troops occurred in First U.S. Army’s zone.

Wednesday – 25th April 1945158

     1300 – Battalion Commander, S-2 and Battery Commanders with their parties left on
               reconnaissance for new position areas.

     1500 – Lieutenant Colonel Bartlett, XII Corps, at Battalion CP.

     1545 – Lieutenant Colonel Bartlett left Battalion CP.

     1800 – Battalion Commander and S-2 returned to Battalion CP.

     0001 – 2400 – No firing one during this period.